FOCUS 2021
Monday-Thursday | November 15-18, 2021
Virtual Conference via Zoom
Health and Human Services, See Stevens Point Offerings


Virtual Conference via Zoom

Monday-Thursday | November 15-18, 2021

Details


The FOCUS conference brings together provider associations, health care providers, and Division of Quality Assurance staff annually to help provide better care and service for Wisconsin elders and those with disabilities. FOCUS, which stands for Forging Our Commitment to Ultimate Service, is a unique opportunity to teach, learn, and collaborate.

The FOCUS conference addresses a wide variety of healthcare-related topics.

The conference serves:

  • Aging and Disability Resource Centers
  • Adult Family Homes
  • Community-Based Residential Facilities
  • Division of Quality Assurance
  • Facilities Serving Individuals with Intellectual Disabilities
  • Home Health Agencies
  • Hospices
  • Life Safety Industry
  • Nursing Homes
  • Residential Care Apartment Complexes

​Registration Information


Full Conference Registration Fee: $195  

Please note: If you will be applying for National Association of Long Term Care Administrators (NAB), American Institute of Architects (AIA), or Social Worker (NASW-WI Chapter) Continuing Education credit, you will be asked to enter your license number during registration.  Please have this information available before registering. 



To pay by check, please download the Paper Registration Form and mail in with payment.   

Reasonable accommodations for persons with disabilities will be made if requested at least four weeks in advance. Please contact UW-Stevens Point Continuing Education at uwspce-conf@uwsp.edu.  

To read session descriptions, please click on the grey drop-down boxes below.

Call for Presenters!

Call for Presenters! 

2021 FOCUS Conference 
Kalahari Resort and Convention Center, Wisconsin Dells
November 17 and 18, 2021

 We're now accepting online proposals for 90-minute breakout or keynote sessions.

The FOCUS conference brings together provider associations, health care providers, and Division of Quality Assurance staff annually to help provide better care and service for Wisconsin elders and those with disabilities. FOCUS (Forging Our Commitment to Ultimate Service) is a unique opportunity to teach, learn, and collaborate. The conference serves:

  • Aging and Disability Resource Centers
  • Aging and Disability Resource Centers
  • Assisted Living Facilities
  • Division of Quality AssuranceFacilities Serving Individuals with Intellectual Disabilities
  • Life Safety Industry
  • Nursing Homes

As such, we look for proposals that apply to a variety of provider types. Proposals that apply to a specific provider type will also be considered, but you should note in your proposal which provider type(s) is your primary intended audience. The conference is intended to be applicable to administrators, architects, case/discharge managers, caregivers, dietitians/dietetic technicians, engineers, medical directors, nurses, pharmacists, quality improvement managers, risk managers, social workers, therapists.

Online Proposal Form
Proposal Deadline: Friday, March 19, 2021

Please complete one online proposal form for each breakout or keynote session idea. Breakout or keynote session title, description, and learning objectives are required at time of submission.

When determining your preferred fee for speaking at the conference, please provide an all-inclusive fee that includes potential travel and meal costs. All speakers receive a complimentary registration to the conference and a hotel room, if held in-person.
The FOCUS 2021 planning committees will review all proposals and selected presenters will be notified by Friday, May 7, 2021. All proposals are selected through a collaborative review process completed by the conference planning committee. The planning committee is made up of staff of the Division of Quality Assurance and members of the provider community.

Need more information? Please email Leann Graffin or call (608) 438-1012.

Session Descriptions | Monday, November 15, 2021

 8-9 a.m. | Monday Opening Keynote

Monday Opening Keynote - 

Presenter: Otis Wood, DQA Administrator, WI Department of Health Services

Welcome and Remarks from DQA Administrator Otis Wood.

Keynote Presenter Biography: Otis has a strong background in healthcare regulations, financial and personnel management, and budget and policy analysis. He has over 30 years of regulatory enforcement experience, and has been with the department of health services since 1990, starting as a nursing home surveyor in October 1990. Since 2005, Otis has served as the Administrator of the Division of Quality Assurance, the Wisconsin state survey agency that licenses and certifies over 9000 providers of healthcare and residential services in Wisconsin and which serves as a partner to the centers for Medicare and Medicaid services for Medicare and Medicaid reimbursement certification. Otis previously served as the agencies deputy state agency director from 2001-2005.  As a member of the Wisconsin Department of Health Services executive team, he meets and consults with the Wisconsin governor’s office, the health department secretary, other state agencies and the stakeholder communities on major regulatory policy initiatives impacting healthcare systems in Wisconsin.


From 2016 to 2017 Otis served  as President of the association of health facility survey agencies, or AHFSA, the national association representing regulatory agencies from across the country and to United States territories.  Prior to serving in that capacity, he served on the AHFSA Executive Council and board of directors as treasurer, corresponding secretary and region representative on behalf of six Midwest states.

Otis received a bachelors of science degree in 1987 from the university of Wisconsin, Madison, and in 2008 completed a master of business administration degree from Edgewood College, also in Madison, during which time he also receives certification in total quality management and quality improvement.  Otis is an active participant in all community activities having served as a football, baseball, and basketball coach, President of Southwest Eagles (now Verona) Youth Hockey Association, and board members of a number of local organizations in the Belleville Wisconsin community. In addition he served as President of the Primrose Lutheran Church Council and President of the Kiwanis Club of Belleville board.


 9:15-10:45 a.m. | Monday Morning Breakout Sessions

Road to Recovery: Person-Centered Design in Behavioral Health


PresentersDavid Kimball, AIA, CCS, CDT, Principal Architect, Wendel, Eau Claire, Wis. and Jerry Deetz, Administrator, Executive Director, Trempealeau County Health Care Center, Whitehall, Wis.

An encore presentation with updated metrics.  In this session, attendees will gain insight into a recovery based behavioral health model that sheds paradigms, strives to eliminate stigma and places the person at the center of each design decision.  The presenters will convey understanding of how empathetic design transforms the built environment to foster wellness, promote confidence building, and create personal pride for each individual.  Attendees will also see how attention to both macro and micro elements can drive success for a positive experience for resident-guests, staff, family, and visitors.

Learning Objectives: 
  1. Assess a facilities delivery of care, population, and current state. 
  2. Distinguish and recognize features of a wellness-focused environment versus illness-focused. 
  3. Apply operational planning and design practices for positive emotional and physical outcomes. 
  4. How attention to both macro and micro elements can drive success. 

Engaged Universities and the Academic Health Department: Promoting Science Through Service


Presenter: Dr. Ryan Westergaard, MD, PHD, MPH, Chief Medical Officer and State Epidemiologist for Communicable Diseases, Wisconsin Department of Health Services

This presentation will focus on the integration of academic public health research and the state/local health departments, with a special emphasis on case examples for how this has occurred during the COVID-19 response in Wisconsin over the last 18 months.

Learning Objectives: 
  1. Receive an in-depth overview of the COVID-19 response in Wisconsin.
  2. Understand the value of academic resources in achieving public health goals. 
  3. Learn how to build mutually beneficial relationships between academic and public health institutions.
  4. Review COVID-19 outbreak investigations and mitigation measures.

Racial Justice and Inclusion in Senior Services


PresenterJacqueline Boyd, B.S., B.A., CGCM, The Care Plan, Chicago, Ill.

In the wake of the George Floyd murders and the resulting national conversation on race in America, senior service providers have a unique role and unique challenges in the workplace.  This workshop provides an understanding of systemic racism and how medical bias contributes to health disparities in black, brown and indigenous communities. Learn how to create more equitable and inclusive work environments with this practical workshop.

Learning Objectives: 
  1. Learn definitions of systemic racism, prejudice and discrimination to effectively identify and create equity on a personal and organizational level. 
  2. Understand how systemic racism impacts diversity, equity and inclusion within health and aging services. 
  3. Learn three strategies to effectively identify and create equity on a personal and organizational level through the remainder of the pandemic and beyond.

 2-3:30 p.m. | Monday Afternoon Breakout Sessions

Out of the Blue-Programming and Design for Wellness


PresenterLarry Schneider, EDAC, Partner, Plunkett Raysich Architects, LLP, Milwaukee, Wis.

This session will explore the secrets of longevity as exhibited by the inhabitants of the Greek island of Ikaria and use these concepts to build into any living environment. 

Learning Objectives: 
  1. Learn about the lifestyles of the people of Ikaria and understand their lifestyles and living environments that foster well-being. 
  2. Learn how facilities (lighting, air quality, acoustics) can foster or hinder wellness. 
  3. Learn how you can gain flexibility in building use to maximize building programming and thoughtful design. 
  4. Learn how to incorporate wellness concepts and design principles into living environments that promote the safety, health and wellness of residents and staff.

Wound Care: Can We Do Better? 


Presenter: Joyce Black, Ph.D., R.N., FAAN, Professor of Nursing, University of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, Neb.

Wound care has recently evolved with more research on the topic, yet clinical care of wounds has remained the same. This presentation will look at the scientific advances and examine current practices highlighting how wound care can improve. 

Learning Objectives: 
  1. Describe methods to improve accuracy of wounds present on admission. 
  2. Identify methods to reduce pressure and shear on pressure injury. 
  3. Identify methods to improve protein and caloric intake. 
  4. Describe the preferred method of wound cleansing.

Trauma Informed Care with Older Adults


PresenterJacqueline Boyd, B.S., B.A., CGCM, The Care Plan, Chicago, Ill.

A trauma informed framework is incredibly useful in serving older adults, building meaningful relationships and successfully meeting their goals. Together we will identify the primary tenets of trauma informed care (TIC) and use practical scenarios and activities to explore how to develop safety, trust, collaboration, choice and empowerment with clients for many different service models.

Learning Objectives: 
  1. Learn the foundational concepts of trauma informed care. 
  2. Gain insight around TIC strategies for older adults. 
  3. Apply learning with case studies and role play opportunities to practice TIC principles.

Session Descriptions | Tuesday, November 16, 2021

 8-9 a.m. | Tuesday Opening Keynote

Tuesday Opening Keynote: Perspective Is the Best Medicine - David Glickman


Presenter: David Glickman, CSP, CPAE, Certified Speaking Professional

Look around the average healthcare workplace. Go ahead, we'll wait. You'll see most professionals struggling with the stress of constant change, increased expectations, and having to do more with less.

In this hilarious keynote, Hall of Fame speaker David Glickman shows you how, by simply making a slight shift in the way you approach these challenges, you'll experience a renewed sense of resilience and a profound new way of handling whatever obstacles you face on the job.


Learning Objectives: 
  1. Understand that asking yourself the right questions is the first step when facing any challenge.  
  2. Learn how to make a shift in perspective and how that becomes transformational. 
  3. Learn to Find What's Funny in stressful workplace situations. 
  4. Achieve "Work-Laugh Balance."

Keynote Presenter Biography: David Glickman, CSP, CPAE, is a Certified Speaking Professional, the highest earned designation presented by the National Speakers Association.  He has also been inducted into the Speaker Hall of Fame. He has presented over 2,000 programs and has been presenting programs almost exclusively to healthcare and long-term care professionals for the last 15 years.

 9:15-10:45 a.m. | Tuesday Morning Breakout Sessions

Industrializing Healthcare Construction: Wisconsin's 1st Volumetric Modular Facility


PresenterJenny Han, Director of Design Integration, BOLDT, Appleton, Wis., Karen McKenzie, AAH, Aurora, and Kyle Weisman, HGA

The focus of the presentation will be how the team worked collaboratively with the Department of Health Services (DHS) to adjust to this paradigm shift in project delivery in support of Wisconsin's first modular healthcare project.

Learning Objectives: 
  1. Understand the DHS approval process. 
  2. Understand the DHS inspection process. 
  3. Learn pre-planning best practices. 
  4. Understand how the industrialization of construction caused the design and construction community to adapt and change.

Now What? Navigating Personal and Professional Recovery


PresenterAimee Wollman Nesseth, M.Div., M.S., Northwest WI Healthcare Emergency Readiness Coalition (NWWIHERC) Program Coordinator, Menomonie, Wis. and Brian Kaczmarski, B.S., MPH Statewide HERC Coordinator 

As we approach the one-year anniversary of the COVID-19 surge in Wisconsin, it's vital to name, acknowledge, and integrate the toll of living and working through a global pandemic. This session will explore concepts such as personal and collective grief, honoring loss, and celebrating individual and community resilience to answer the question "now what?". This session will provide tools to help you and your team strategically and confidently thrive post-pandemic.

Learning Objectives: 
  1. Utilize trauma and grief theory to identify losses and the impact of COVID-19. 
  2. Describe the importance of intentionality as it relates to healing. 
  3. Demonstrate the importance of naming what has been lost and unattended. 
  4. Apply and integrate lessons learned into personal and professional growth.

Pressure Injury Prevention


Presenter
Joyce Black, Ph.D., R.N., FAAN, Professor of Nursing, University of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, Neb.

Pressure injury forms due to exposure to intense pressure or pressure over a long period of time. The tolerance of soft tissue for pressure varies in all persons. This session will address hot to reduce pressure and improve tolerance

Learning Objectives: 
  1. Identify the relationship between the intensity and duration of pressure and the tolerance of soft tissue for pressure
  2. Describe nursing interventions that can reduce the intensity and duration of pressure
  3. Discuss nursing interventions that can reduce the impact of shear
  4. Identify correctable problems in residents that reduce tolerance for pressure and shear.

Balancing Rights, Choice, and Safety in Minimizing the Effects of Social Isolation  


Presenter
Kim Marheine, Ombudsman Services Supervisor, State of Wisconsin Board on Aging and Long Term Care, Madison, Wis.

This presentation will discuss the impact of social supports vs. isolation on residents of long-term care settings.  Particular emphasis will be placed on finding the balance between dignity of risk, self-determination and safety related to the most recent pandemic response as well as shorter term circumstances that isolate residents from essential supports.

Learning Objectives: 
  1. Understand the role of the ombudsman in resolving resident concerns and complaints, providing education and facilitating resolution in situations of conflict or decisions that involve risk. 
  2. Review current research linking social engagement to health and well-being in vulnerable populations. 
  3. Consider rights, risk and long-term care service provider responsibilities relative to resident expressions of choice. 
  4. Discuss services and supports available within communities to support resident engagement.

 2-3:30 p.m. | Tuesday Afternoon Breakout Sessions

Elevating the Resident Experience with Considerate Unit Design


Presenter
Andrew Aiden, M.Arch, AG Architechture, Wauwautosa, Wis., Eric Harrmann, and Russ McLaughlin

Senior living communities often focus on the development and design of amenity spaces. Marketing materials picture the grand entry lobbies, engaging activity spaces, and enticing dining venues. Those spaces are important, but in reality, the spaces not often shown are the ones that get the most use, the private resident spaces (apartments and resident rooms). Considerate design of resident units is important to achieving resident satisfaction and a positive community experience as well as providing additional marketing power.  This session will set the stage by discussing an interactive process for designing resident unit spaces, utilizing a variety of methods (digital and real world) to explain complex architectural and interior design information in an easy-to-understand format.

Learning Objectives: 
  1. Learn about an interactive process for designing resident living spaces, utilizing a variety of methods to explain complex architectural and interior design information in an easy-to-understand format. As a result, feedback from staff, residents, and family members enriches the final product. 
  2. Learn the key design aspects of resident units, including entry foyers, kitchens, dining rooms, living rooms, bedrooms, bathrooms, utility/storage areas and balconies. A variety of examples will be shared from differing care levels and senior living communities across the country. 
  3. Be able to discuss how well-designed senior living resident units located along the continuum of care supports a positive place experience for residents, family members, and staff. 
  4. Be exposed to the value of going beyond building code requirements and striving for a universal design approach in senior living. The experiential and functional advantages will be discussed for residents, family members, and staff.

Grievance & Complaints: How Ongoing Discussions in Your QAPI Program Can Impact Your Survey Results


Presenter
Robin Wolzenburg, BSN, RN, Director of Housing and Clinical Services, LeadingAge Wisconsin, Madison, WI. and Lauren Davis, RN Clinical Advisor, LeadingChoice Network, Madison, Wis.

Quality Assurance and Performance Improvements (QAPI) are part of your facility's ongoing commitment to quality. According to recent data, the majority of surveys and Immediate Jeopardy (IJ) citations are stemming from complaints and grievances, most of which could have been resolved at the facility level. In this session, you will learn the importance of building and strengthening your current QAPI program to address the number one driver of survey visits in our settings.

Learning Objectives: 
  1. Understand what a QAPI program is and how it impacts your survey process. 
  2. Identify what drives complaints and grievances. 
  3. Identify areas for improvement within your facility's QAPI process. 
  4. Create and implement an ongoing process to address grievance and complaints.

High Engagement High Success


Presenter: Laci Cornelison, Owner, MS, LBSW, AHCA, Cornelison Consulting, LLC, Olsburg, KS

Have you ever been excited to implement something in your organization, but somewhere between the great idea and the execution it never took off? Involving team members from across your organization in the exploration, idea generation, planning, and execution of what you want to implement may be the simple key to success.  Participants of the Kansas PEAK 2.0 program, implementing deep change to support person-centered care, have proven that high involvement leads to higher success rates of tangible organizational change. Those nursing homes engaging 75-100% of their teams in the change process are 84.5% more likely to achieve objective success in person-centered care (Cornelison, et al., 2019). Learn how you can use similar strategies to attain success in your own goals. 

Learning Objectives: 
  1. Be able to define organizational involvement in the process of organizational change initiatives. 
  2. Learn and practice different techniques that lead to high organizational involvement. 
  3. Reflect on how these techniques could be used in their own organizations to improve successful execution of goals.

Understanding the "P" to the "M" in PDPM, Patient Driven Payment Model 


Presenter: Heather Newton, RN, BSN, RAC-CT, WCC, Nurse Consultant, WI DHS DQZ, Weyauwega, Wis.

This session will provide comprehensive education to those facilities that use the Minimum Data Set (MDS) for the Patient Driven Payment Model (PDPM). You'll learn coding tips of the MDS elements to assist providers in meeting the (Prospective Payment System) PPS requirements in achieving a PDPM billing code and excellent resident outcomes.  

Learning Objectives: 
  1. Interpret what PDPM is or isn't. 
  2. Identify the components of PDPM Develop accurate HIPPS code. 
  3. Outline tips for coding the MDS.

Session Descriptions | Wednesday, November 17, 2021

 8-9 a.m. | Wednesday Opening Keynote

Opening Keynote - Finding the Funny in Change


Presenter
Jan McInnis, BS, The Work Lady, Los Angeles, Cal.

The lightning-fast pace of the recent change we've been experiencing is staggering to many leaders, organizations, and some members of your teams. This rapid, continuous change often results in fear, tension, and miscommunication. In this fun and information packed keynote, attendees will learn how to diffuse tension instantly, initiate tough conversations, and facilitate communications through using humor. Experts say that information plus emotion equals retention, and this keynote provides solid information couched with hilarious appropriate humor.

Learning Objectives: 
  1. Gain practical, immediately useable skills for handling change using humor, including how to diffuse tension instantly, kick off tough conversations, and open lines of communications. 
  2. Understand what they should AVOID doing when faced with change. 
  3. Learn the health benefits of using humor. 
  4. Understand the importance of adapting to change.

 9:15-10:45 a.m. | Wednesday Morning Breakout Sessions

Healing as a Healthcare Worker:  Resilience, Recovery, and Growth


Presenter: Dr. Mariah Quinn

In this presentation, evidence-based models of well-being will be discussed as well as key strategies for individual healthcare workers, and their organizations, to support resilience.  These concepts will be situated in the current global pandemic, with attention to disaster recovery and facilitation of post-traumatic growth.  Elements of this presentation will be experiential, with an aim of leaving participants feeling a sense of renewal.

Learning Objectives: 
  1. Understand how healthcare worker well-being supports patient well-being. 
  2. Be able to identify individual and organizational contributions to healthcare worker well-being, and experience 1-2 of these. 
  3. Explain the stages of disaster recovery, and how this relates to the COVID pandemic. 
  4. Be able to define post-traumatic growth and factors that increase its likelihood.

Ask a Surveyor: Division of Quality Assurance (DQA) Bureau of Assisted Living (BAL) Panel


PresenterHillary Holman and Jerry Riederer, DQA/AL

This session is for assisted living providers. Join BAL regulators in an interactive discussion. BAL staff will make introductory remarks on assisted living administration, rising acuity, admission/ transfer/ discharge and emerging trends.

Risk, Care Visits, Visitation, and COVID-19 and Infection Prevention: A Person-Centered Approach


Presenter: Deb Burdsall

Assessing risk to residents and risk to facility has always been difficult, but the COVID-19 pandemic has added extra layers to assessing risk and providing psychosocial, spiritual, and physical support to residents. This presentation will discuss the history of the pandemic in context of risk reduction in congregate care, vaccinations, use of personal protective equipment (PPE) and source control, testing, and screening. Guidance on Compassionate Care, Essential Caregiving, life enrichment, and visitation will be discussed.  

Learning Objectives: 
  1. Learn how strategies to control outbreaks and reduce risk during the early months of the COVID-19 pandemic developed and changed
  2. Evaluate how current  guidance and standards can be incorporated into a facility plan
  3. Learn how to implement a risk based approach for providing and encouraging Compassionate Care and Essential Caregiver support utilizing current guidance and standard

 2-3:30 p.m. | Wednesday Afternoon Breakout Sessions

OSHA COVID-19 in Healthcare  


PresenterMary Bauer, CIH, CSP, Compliance Assistance Specialist, OSHA, Eau Claire, Wis.

OSHA ETS (Emergency Temporary Standard) for Healthcare is in place at this time to prevent the spread of COVID-19 in Healthcare. The presentation will cover the intent, exemptions, programs and controls required by the ETS.

Learning Objectives: 
  1. Understand OSHA's intent for the ETS. 
  2. Understand who is covered under the ETS for Healthcare. 
  3. Know how to implement the guidance for all industries. 
  4. Delineate requirements for fully vaccinated and unvaccinated employees.

From a Systemic Event That Led to Current Non-Compliance to Past Non-Compliance


Presenters: Ann Angell, Bureau Director, Bureau of Nursing Home Resident Care, Division of Quality Assurance, Jessica Radtke, Deputy Bureau Director, Bureau of Nursing Home Resident Care, Division of Quality Assurance, Juli Brandt, Regional Field Operations Director, Bureau of Nursing Home Resident Care, Division of Quality Assurance, and Henry Petrick, Nurse Consultant II, Bureau of Education Services and Technology, Division of Quality Assurance Department of Health Services. 

This session is for Nursing Home providers.  This panel presentation will be reviewing and managing systemic concerns to achieve “Past Non-Compliance.”

Learning Objectives: 
  1. Learn how to use the State Operations Manual, Appendix Q to integrate a Systemic Events/Concerns to get to past Non-Compliance using QAPI, root cause analysis.

Virtual Health as a Planned and Purposeful Model of Care


PresenterAmy Driscoll, DNP, RN, GCNS-BC, Director of Education and Clinical Practice, Advocate Aurora Continuing Health, Milwaukee, Wis. and Melissa Jordan BSN, RN, Advocate Aurora Continuing Health, Milwaukee, Wis.

During this session the presenter will discuss the benefits of utilizing data reflecting health indicators, lifestyle and medical history for  use of virtual health in the community and facility setting. 

Learning Objectives: 
  1. Discuss approaches to ongoingly assign patient populations into a particular risk status based on data supported by Virtual Health Programs. 
  2. Learn effective strategies to offset cost through use of virtual health. 
  3. Understand clinical considerations for patient population management and reduce unnecessary and costly health care utilization.

Session Descriptions | Thursday, November 18, 2021

 8-9 a.m. | Thursday Opening Keynote

Opening Keynote - The Lingering Ethical Questions in Our Pandemic Response


PresenterMichael Gillette, Ph.D., President, Bioethical Services of Virginia, Inc., Lynchb, Virginia

This highly-interactive, case-based discussion will examine how compassion fatigue can impact provider-recipient interactions and collegial relations. We will examine case studies from across all areas of service as we consider the proper role of providers, legitimate limits on services, the ethical risks of over-functioning, and organizational responsibilities to manage staff burn out.

Learning Objectives: 
  1. Define compassion fatigue and burnout and examine the symptoms of each. 
  2. Distinguish between appropriate and inappropriate levels of service. 
  3. Examine the ethics of withholding or withdrawing support in an environment where individuals served may not have alternative sources of services.

 9:15-10:45 a.m. | Thursday Morning Breakout Sessions

Unpacking 2020: Lessons Learned in Crisis Communications


PresenterLori Richards, CEO, Mueller Communications, Milwaukee, Wis.

2020 has shown the power of the media - both traditional and social - and the importance of transparent, accurate, timely, communications. COVID-19 was the impetus for many changes within our organizations, including likely changes regarding how and why we communicate. Join Lori Richards from Mueller Communications as she unpacks real-life, recent examples of crisis communications, valuable lessons, and actionable best practices you can follow to prepare your organization to deal with modern-day crisis situations.

Learning Objectives: 
  1. Understand how the media works in the COVID era. 
  2. Evaluate their own crisis readiness. 
  3. Learn basic techniques to evaluate and handle a basis crisis. 
  4. Integrate best practices into existing crisis management plan.

Ask An Ombudsman


PresenterKim Marheine, Ombudsman Services Supervisor, State of Wisconsin Board on Aging and Long Term Care, Madison, Wis.

This panel presentation will provide a description of both known and unique features of ombudsman services for long-term care consumers, their representatives and providers.

Learning Objectives: 
  1. Understand the role of the ombudsman in resolving resident concerns and complaints, providing education and facilitating resolution in situations of conflict or decisions that involve risk. 
  2. Expand their understanding of the advocacy services available for residents with unique needs or circumstances. 
  3. Consider rights and long-term care service provider responsibilities relative to resident choice. 
  4. Discuss solutions to challenges such as family conflict, residents’ rights and working with community resources.

Understanding and Addressing Health Misinformation


PresenterAjay Sethi, Ph.D., MHS, Associate Professor, UW-Madison, Madison, Wis.

The COVID-19 Pandemic reminded us of the longstanding problem of health misinformation on our society. We all are susceptible to it, and we all play a role in in minimize its impacts.

Learning Objectives: 
  1. Examine different types of health misinformation. 
  2. Explore the basis of adopting and perpetuating health misinformation. 
  3. Evaluate our abilities (and inabilities) to address health misinformation.

 2-3:45 p.m. | Thursday Afternoon Breakout Sessions

The Ethics of Compassion Fatigue


PresenterMichael Gillette, Ph.D., President, Bioethical Services of Virginia, Inc., Lynchb, Virginia

This highly-interactive, case-based discussion will examine how compassion fatigue can impact provider-recipient interactions and collegial relations. We will examine case studies from across all areas of service as we consider the proper role of providers, legitimate limits on services, the ethical risks of over-functioning, and organizational responsibilities to manage staff burn out.

Learning Objectives: 
  1. To define compassion fatigue and burnout and examine the symptoms of each. 
  2. To distinguish between appropriate and inappropriate levels of service. 
  3. To examine the ethics of withholding or withdrawing support in an environment where individuals served may not have alternative sources of services.

What's the Difference between RN and LPN responsibility in Nursing Homes


PresentersPat Boyer, MSM, RN, NHA, WHCA/WiCAL, Madison, Wis. and Sonali M. Wilborn, MD, MBA, HMDC  Chief Clinical Officer Advance Care Planning and Quality Outcomes, GAPS Health 

It's obvious that the staffing crisis has prevented many facilities from having 24/7 Registered Nurses (RN) in Skilled Nursing Facilities (SNF). SNFs are forced to rely on Licensed Practical Nurses to carry out oversight of resident care. But, what does the Wisconsin Nurse Practice Act say about that? This workshop will explore how facilities are providing care to residents when an RN is not on duty. We will discuss some options for nurse assessment including RN on call, telehealth services, and others. 

Learning Objectives: 
  1. Identify the Scope of Practice for RNs and LPNs in Wisconsin facilities. 
  2. Determine alternatives available to provide assessment services. 
  3. Describe what to expect from your Medical Director. 
  4. Discuss how to implement alternatives in your facility.

Voting in Care Facilities: Rights, Responsibilities, and Resources


PresenterBarbara Beckert, Disability Rights Wisconsin, Richard Rydecki, Assistant Administrator, Wisconsin Elections Commission, Ellen Henningsen, Elections Specialist, Wisconsin Elections Commission, and Mitchell Hagopian, Managing Attorney, Disability Rights Wisconsin

This session will discuss voting in care facilities.  Panel members will explain Wisconsin’s Special Voting Deputy process and the role of care facility staff when SVDs are conducting voting, voter registration and absentee voting, and resident rights including the rights of residents under guardianship.  The panel will also address the responsibility of facilities to ensure residents are able to exercise their Constitutional right to vote and the role of staff.  Participants will receive a comprehensive resource list. 

Learning Objectives: 
  1. Receive an overview of the Special Voting Deputy (SVD) process and the role of care facility staff when SVDs are conducting voting. 
  2. Understand election deadlines for voter registration and absentee ballot requests. 
  3. Gain knowledge about resident rights, including the rights of residents under guardianship. 
  4. Understand the responsibilities of facilities to ensure residents are able to exercise their Constitutional right to vote and the role of staff.

 ‭(Hidden)‬ Closing Speaker?

Closing Speaker info

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​Who Should Attend

​Who Should Attend

  • Administrators
  • Architects
  • Case/Discharge Managers
  • Caregivers
  • Dietitians/Dietetic Technicians
  • Engineers
  • Infection Preventionist
  • Maintenance Directors
  • Medical Directors
  • Nurses
  • Nursing Assistants
  • Pharmacists
  • Physical Plant Managers
  • Quality Improvement Managers
  • Risk Managers
  • Social Workers
  • Therapists

​Provider Types

  • Aging and Disability Resource Centers
  • Adult Family Homes
  • Care and Treatment Services
  • Community-Based Residential Facilities
  • Division of Quality Assurance
  • Facilities Serving Individuals with Intellectual Disabilities
  • Home Health Agencies
  • Hospices
  • Nursing homes
  • Residential Care Apartment Complexes

Whova Conference App


For the third year, the Whova conference management app will be running the digital show for the FOCUS conference. After test runs in 2019 and 2020, attendees largely had positive things to say about Whova. Whova is a free app for your Android or iOS mobile device. Shortly after you sign up for the FOCUS 2021 conference and receive a confirmation, you’ll be able to access the conference on the app. That’s where the fun starts!

Whova not only allows you to view the agenda and room locations, but also allows you to communicate with speakers, exhibitors, and other attendees using personal messaging, the community forums, and the exhibitor area. All of the content will be accessible in Whova, including downloads of slide decks and other handouts.

Continuing Education Hours (CEHs)


The FOCUS conference is seeking Continuing Education certification approval from the National Continuing Education Review Service (NCERS) of the National Association of Long Term Care Administrator Boards (NAB) and from the National Association of Social Workers, Wisconsin Chapter.  

The Life Safety Track will be seeking approval from the American Institute of Architects (AIA). 
AIA Provider Number: 502111364 // Learning Unit Designation: LU HSW

Contact Information


For questions regarding registration, contact UW-Stevens Point Continuing Education at uwspce-conf@uwsp.edu.

For questions regarding the FOCUS 2021 Conference, contact Leann Graffin at leann.graffin@dhs.wisconsin.gov.

Cancellation Policy


Full refunds granted upon receipt of written request to uwspce-conf@uwsp.edu.  

Substitutions can be made at any time, but no shows will be responsible for the full conference fee.  On-site registration will not be permitted.

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Reasonable accommodations for persons with disabilities will be made if requested at least four weeks in advance. Please contact UW-Stevens Point Continuing Education at uwspce-conf@uwsp.edu