Environmental sculptor in residence at UW-Stevens Point
4/3/2013
Internationally acclaimed environmental sculptor Patrick Dougherty is working with students and community members to create a large-scale piece on the University of Wisconsin-Stevens Point campus while serving as an artist-in-residence.
The sculpture is being built outside the Noel Fine Arts Center during the April 1-18 residency. It is being created with maple, willow and dogwood saplings that have been harvested locally in an environmentally sensitive way.
A reception for the sculpture will take place on Thursday, April 18, at 6 p.m. at the Specht Memorial Forum/Sundial, where the piece is being installed. The event is free and open to the public.
“Patrick’s work has the effect of building community through a shared experience of creating art together,” said Kristin Thielking, professor of art and design. “We look forward not only to the work of art itself and to Patrick’s residency, but to the experience of working together on what can be seen as a celebration of our connectedness.”
To volunteer or for additional information about Dougherty’s sculpture project and related events, please contact Keven Brunett at Keven.Brunett@uwsp.edu or Kristin Thielking at Kristin.Thielking@uwsp.edu or go to the College of Fine Arts and Communication website at www.uwsp.edu/cofac. Additional sponsors include the College of Natural Resources, Schmeeckle Reserve, Treehaven, Fiskars of Wausau and the Sisters of St. Joseph of the Third Order of St. Frances.
Dougherty, of Chapel Hill, N.C., is an award-winning sculptor. He has combined his carpentry skills with his love of nature to create more than 230 large scale sculptures worldwide – from Scotland to Japan to Brussels and all over the United States. His use of primitive building techniques and tree saplings as construction material has evolved from single pieces on conventional pedestals to huge scale environmental works. More information and samples of his sculptures may be found at www.stickwork.net.

Article Tags

CNR; COFAC