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Julia M. Fischer, Ph.D., CCC-SLP


faculty Chair, Communication Sciences and Disorders
Professor of Communication Sciences and Disorders
Co-coordinator of CSD Graduate Programs

julia.fischer@uwsp.edu
Phone: 715-346-4657
Office: 034 CPS

Education:

  • B.S., University of Wisconsin-Madison, 1987
  • M.Ed., University of Virginia, Charlottesville, 1989
  • Ph.D., University of Nebraska-Lincoln, 1995

Courses Taught:

  • CSD 264 Anatomy and Physiology of Speech and Language
  • CSD 724 Neuromotor Speech Disorders
  • CSD 740 Aphasia and Age-Related Changes
  • CSD 765 Augmentative and Alternative Communication
  • CSD 791-795 Graduate Practicum

Research Interests:

  • Communication support for people with aphasia, cognitive-communication impairments, dysarthria and apraxia
  • Augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) for people with complex communication needs (CCNs)

Recent Publications:

  • Garrett, K., Lasker, J., & Fischer, J.M. (2020).  AAC supports for adults with severe aphasia and apraxia of speech.  In D. Beukelman & J. Light (Eds.), Augmentative and Alternative Communication: Supporting children and adults with complex communication needs. (5th ed.). Baltimore: Paul H. Brookes.
  • King, J. M., & Simmons-Mackie, N. (2017). Communication supports and best practices: Ensuring people with aphasia have an effective means of expressing needs and wishes. Topics in Language Disorders, 37, 348-360.
  • King, J. M. (2015). Augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) and children with language disorders. In J. N. Kaderavek (Ed.), Language Disorders in Children: Fundamental concepts of assessment and intervention (2nd ed.). Upper Saddle River, NJ: Pearson Education.
  • King, J. M. (2014). Betty: Supporting communication for a person with aphasia. In A. Dietz & J. W. McCarthy (Ed.), Augmentative and alternative communication: An interactive clinical casebook. San Diego, CA: Plural Publishing.
  • King, J. M. (2014). Augmentative and alternative communication and complex communication needs. In L. M. Justice & E. E. Redle (Eds.), Communication Sciences and Disorders: A Clinical Evidence-Based Approach (3nd ed.). Upper Saddle River, NJ: Pearson Education.
  • King, J. M. (2013). Communication supports. In N. Simmons-Mackie, J. King, & D. Beukelman (Eds.), Supporting Communication for Adults with Acute and Chronic Aphasia. Baltimore: Paul H. Brookes.
  • King, J. M., & Lasker, J. P. (2013 online). Supporting end-of-life communication: Topics and partners. Journal of Medical Speech-Language Pathology, 21 (2).
  • King, J. M., Simmons-Mackie, N., & Beukelman, D. (2013). Supporting communication: Improving the experience of living with aphasia. In N. Simmons-Mackie, J. King, & D. Beukelman (Eds.), Supporting Communication for Adults with Acute and Chronic Aphasia. Baltimore: Paul H. Brookes.
  • Simmons-Mackie, N. & King, J. M. (2013). Communication support for everyday life situations. In N. Simmons-Mackie, J. King, & D. Beukelman (Eds.), Supporting Communication for Adults with Acute and Chronic Aphasia. Baltimore: Paul H. Brookes.
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