Wisconsin Peer Recovery Conference
August 18-19, 2022
Madison Marriott West
Health and Human Services, See Stevens Point Offerings


Wisconsin Peer Recovery Conference | August 18-19, 2022
Madison Marriott West

Details

Conference Objectives 

Demonstrate aspects of effective peer support within community services mental health and substance use recovery, enhance individual skills to provide more effective personal support, and explore innovative applications of peer support in communities 

Who Should Attend

Advocates, individuals interested in supporting others more effectively, Mental Health Professionals, and Peer Specialists.

2022 Call for Proposals

What are we looking for?

Proposals that align with our track objectives and/or demonstrate evidenced-based practices, support various pathways of recovery, as well as highlight the direct inclusion of people with lived experience following the movement of Peer Support, WI Certified Peer Specialists, and Certified Parent Peer Specialists are encouraged to apply.  For more information, click on the Workshop Proposal Submission button.

Proposals are due by 11:59 PM CST Friday, March 4, 2022.

If you have any questions regarding the proposal submission process, please contact Nicole Ravens, Conference Coordinator, via phone at 608.787.1111 or email Nicole.Ravens@ilresources.org.

Registration Information 


Registration Opens Spring 2022!

Scholarship Application Now Available!


Scholarships are available for Wisconsin peers, or their allies, who require financial assistance to attend the Virtual WI Peer Recovery Conference August 18-20, 2021.  Scholarships are available for the full amount of conference registration ($75).

Complete the Scholarship Application Form by July 7, 2021 if you would like to be considered for a scholarship. Please note that there may be a limited number fo scholarships.  Please only seek a scholarship if you require financial assistance.

DO NOT REGISTER for the conference if you are submitting a scholarship application! If you are awarded a scholarship, instructions will be sent by email with specific registration information no later than July 15, 2021.  

If you have any questions, please email Nicole Ravens@ilresources.org or call 608-787-1111.


​2021 Virtual Exhibitor Information

All exhibitors will receive one complementary conference registration ($75 value!) and a virtual exhibit booth designed by your agency with your choice of graphics, videos, promotional links, etc.

2021 Exhibit Fees:

  • $100 Non-Profit Agencies
  • $125 For-Profit Agencies


Exhibit space is limited and is available on a first-come, first-served basis. Exhibitor registration closes Wednesday, July 22, 2021. Virtual exhibit booth content due no later than Friday, July 24, 2021. No exceptions will be made. 

For additional information, please contact conference coordinator Nicole Ravens at Nicole.Ravens@ilresources.org or 608-787-1111.


Conference-at-a-Glance


All times listed below are in Central Standard Time (CST).

Wednesday, August 18, 2021

 12:30-2:30 p.m. CST | Welcome, Opening Ceremonies, and Opening Keynote: Tracy Littlejohn

Welcome

Presenter: Chelsey Myhre Foster, Statewide Coordinator, Peer Run Recovery Centers, Certified Peer Specialist, Independent Living Resources, La Crosse, Wis.

Invocation

Presenter: Michelle Haskins, M.Ed., Early Childhood Education Faculty, Certified Peer Specialist, Lac Courte Oreilles Ojibwe College

Presenter Biography: Bimijiwanikwe, Michelle Haskins is a Lac Courte Oreilles (LCO) tribal member who has acquired her knowledge and wisdom from the elders of her community.  Her personal and professional training and licensure in education have provided the skills necessary to teach in various capacities. She has been actively engaged in the progression of a healthy and productive community at LCO over 20 years by serving on several boards, committees, and volunteer work. Her lifelong aspiration and commitment are to help our Indigenous communities thrive. 

Ojibwe Welcome Song 

Presenter: Michael Migizi Sullivan, Sr., Ph.D., Ayaanjibii'iged-Linguist, Waadookodaading

Migizi will sing a welcome song in the round dance fashion.

Presenter Biography: Michael Migizi Sullivan is an Ojibwe singer from the Lac Courte Oreilles reservation in northern Wisconsin.  He is the lead singer of the award winning drum group Pipestone who have released several albums and have performed at powwows and other events across North America.  He sings round dance music performed on a hand drum, powwow music performed with a group on a large drum, and ceremonial music.  He helped mentor his sons and their group Hay Creek, well known on the powwow trail.  You can find him singing with his family, The Sullivan Squad at round dances and other events across North America.  He sings for health, happiness, and life for all of his people. 

Opening Keynote: Intergenerational Trauma: How the Past Hurts the Present 


Presenter: Tracy Littlejohn, Activist, Ho-Chunk Nation, La Crosse, Wis.

Intergenerational trauma is the transmission of historical oppression and its negative consequences across generations. There is evidence of the impact of intergenerational trauma on the health and well-‐being and on the health and social disparities facing many populations including indigenous peoples of the Americas, African Americans, and refugees. This keynote will explore the events that have affected communities in Wisconsin and the rest of the United States, how these traumas are passed down and how they manifest. Lastly, how healing may look different for people of color also affected by Intergenerational Trauma.

Learning Objectives: 

  1. Participants will be introduced to what intergenerational trauma is.
  2. Participants will learn to identify symptoms of intergenerational trauma.
  3. Participants will consider why mainstream counseling may not help those with intergenerational trauma and identify alternatives or methods to adapt mainstream counseling that may lead to resiliency and healing.

Tracy Littlejohn Headshot.jpgTracy Littlejohn, a member of the Ho-Chunk Nation and has spent her adult life working toward improving the lives of her native community. She has been studying and teaching about intergenerational trauma, racial justice, Native American History, as well as being a supporter of environmentalist endeavors regarding oil pipelines, mining, and supporting the Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women awareness efforts. Tracy's life has centered around supporting and advocating for people of color as well as other under-represented populations. Tracy has worked for the Ho-Chunk Nation in several capacities ranging from Legislative Chief of Staff to Researcher to Public Relations. She currently works for their Youth Services program with Native American youth in the La Crosse area. Tracy is also an independent contractor to provide facilitation for Racial Justice training through the La Crosse YWCA. Tracy takes an interest in her local community by serving on the Board of Directors for the La Crosse Historical Society, is a current Commissioner of the City Park Board, and advises the UW-La Crosse Native American Student Association.

 3-4 p.m. CST | Breakout Sessions 1-4

#1  Intergenerational Trauma: How Federal Policies Have Broken More Than Treaties


Presenter: Tracy Littlejohn, Activist, Ho-Chunk Nation, La Crosse, Wis.

This presentation will uncover how Federal policies regarding Native Americans has led to the inherited pain and trauma of today's communities. The effects of attempts to save the Native Americans such as boarding schools will be discussed. 

Learning Objectives:

  1. Participants will develop an understanding of epigenetics and Intergenerational Trauma.
  2. Participants will review the history of US policies regarding Native Americans for the last 200 years.
  3. Participants will build understanding around the distinct foundations marginalized populations have and healing needs for their mental health.

Presenter Biography: Tracy Littlejohn is a member of the Ho-Chunk Nation and has spent her adult life working toward improving the lives of her native community.  She has been studying and teaching about intergenerational trauma, racial justice, Native American History, as well as being a supporter of environmentalist endeavors regarding oil pipelines, mining and supporting the Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women awareness efforts. Tracy's life has centered around supporting and advocating for people of color as well as other under-represented populations. Tracy has worked for the Ho-Chunk Nation in several capacities ranging from Legislative Chief of Staff to Researcher to Public Relations.  She currently works for their Youth Services program with Native American youth in the La Crosse area. Tracy is also an independent contractor to provide facilitation for Racial Justice training through the La Crosse YWCA. Tracy takes an interest in her local community by serving on the Board of Directors for the La Crosse Historical Society, is a current Commissioner of the City Park Board, and advises the UW-La Crosse Native American Student Association.

#2  Peer-Based Recovery-Moving From Competencies to Connection


Presenter:
 Aaron Rasch, Program Coordinator and Community Educator, La Crosse, Wis.

This workshop explores how to guide others toward meaningful connections.  These connections offer an anchor that protect against stress, depression, anxiety, and substance use. By shifting focus toward connections, versus individual treatment, natural supports are enhanced and long-standing protective factors are created.

Learning Objectives:

  1. Participants will learn at least three underlying disconnections that contribute to mental illness and addiction.
  2. Participants will consider new ways to approach mental health recovery, with at least one example in each of the seven disconnections.
  3. Participants will draw at least one idea how mental health or addiction recovery services could look different if effort was placed on healing connections versus symptom management.

Presenter Biography: Aaron Rasch has 18 years of experience assisting individuals in complex situations related to homelessness, mental illness, addiction, disabilities, and income insecurity.  An experienced community educator, Aaron has facilitated over a hundred courses and training for advocates, front-line staff, teachers, peer specialists and community at large. 

#3  The Weight Stigma and Mental Health Connection


Presenter: Tori Krohn, CPS, BS, Soar Case Management

Weight stigma is experienced by many in everyday life, including healthcare.  In this workshop, come take a deeper look into what weight stigma looks like, how it affects health, and action steps one can take.  In addition, a review of various eating disorders and diversity in eating disorders will be addressed. 

Learning Objectives:

  1. Participants will develop an awareness of what weight stigma is and be able to list at least three examples.
  2. Participants will gain knowledge on various types of eating disorders and how weight stigma contributes to a lack of treatment.
  3. Participants will learn action steps one can take in their own life to combat weight stigma. 

Presenter Biography: Tori Krohn has been passionate about supporting those with eating disorders since working through her own recovery.  Tori has desires of bringing more peer support into eating disorder recovery support, as clinical support is often non-accessible to many. Tori has been passionately trying to bring awareness to eating disorders and weight stigma in the different environments she works in, including working at events to raise awareness of eating disorders and weight stigma  in her community,  speaking at the Madison NEDA walk, and embracing a yoga for all bodies approach as a certified yoga teacher.  Tori has been working as a CPS and CPS supervisor at Soar Case Management for the last 2.5 years, and was an active volunteer and now board member for Project Maria, a non-profit focused on eating disorder awareness in Rock county, all while furthering her own educating in nutrition.

#4  Green Disability: Peer Support Can Unite the Mental and Physical Disability Movements


Presenter:
 David Oaks, Revolutionary Consultant, Aciu! Institute, LLD

How can peer mutual support in both the physical & mental disability movements help our world prepare for and respond resiliently to disasters including climate crisis? Our society seems too complacent and almost resigned, but peer support is a practical way for groups to creatively prepare for future disasters and defend vulnerable communities that are especially threatened by disasters such as the climate crisis and pandemics.

Learning Objectives:

  1. Participants will become aware of building the bridge between the mental and physical disability movements (historically marginalized and oppressed communities) and why this bridge is so important to social equity & justice.
  2. We will use a lens of diverse lived experience, for both the mental and physical disability movements, for a better understanding of why this unity improves the resilience and wellness of the general society.
  3. While peer support for people with lived experience usually applies to those of us with psychiatric diagnoses, participants in this workshop will understand the new concept of “green disability” and how the general society needs the value of peer support to address crises such as the greenhouse effect and pandemics. 

Presenter Biography: This is David Oaks' 45th year as a psychiatric survivor human rights activist. Raised working class, he attended Harvard on scholarship and was put in psychiatric institutions five times-experiencing forced drugging. David recovered with peer & family support, exercise, nutrition, counseling, nature, protest, work, and graduated with honors. In 2012, David broke his neck becoming a quadriplegic and started a green disability consulting business, Aciu! Institute. David lives with his wife, Debra, in Oregon. 

Thursday, August 19, 2021

 8:15-8:45 a.m. CST | Thursday Facilitated Networking

Facilitated Networking

As we gear up for 2022 let's take some time to imagine what new directions Wisconsin Peer support can grow.  This brief check in is to connect peers who are interested in exploring what a Youth Peer Support endorsement might look like. Facilitated by Tara Wilhelmi of EOTO Culturally Rooted.

 9-10:30 a.m. CST | Morning Keynote: Tanya Kraege & Skye Boughman

​Opening Keynote: Healing Community-Wide Grief: Addressing Grief in the Age of Opioid, Suicide, and COVID-19 Crises 


Presenters: Tanya Kraege, CPS, CPS Trainer, Safe Communities MDC, Madison, Wis. and Skye Boughman, MS, LPC, CSAC, ARC Community Services, Madison, Wis.

This presentation will provide a safe space to process grief and loss. Participants will have the opportunity to hear from multiple marginalized communities on ways their communities work through grief. Agency policies and practices around loss of peers will explored.

Learning Objectives: 

  1. Participants will have the opportunity to examine the grief stage they are experiencing in a safe space.
  2. Participants will learn at least three techniques that other historically marginalized communities have used in healing from grief.
  3. Participants will leave with ideas for agency policies and practices around loss of peers. 

Tanya Kraege.png Tanya Kraege is the Drug Poisoning Prevention Recovery Coach Team Manager at Safe Communities MDC and a mental health clinician at Journey Mental Health in the crisis unit. She specializes in working with people with substance use challenges, women using substances while pregnant, trauma, relationships and mental health challenges. Tanya has worked in the field of mental health and substance use for 13 years and currently oversees Recovery Coaches and Certified Peer Specialists who work in a variety of environments in Dane County to support people with SUD, MH and families affected by SUD and MH challenges. Tanya played a role in the Health Care Task Force on Safe Opioid Prescribing by participating in the academic detailing program for working with clinicians on co-prescribing Naloxone with opioid prescription medications. In addition to being a Clinical Social Worker, Clinical Substance Abuse Counselor and a community advocate, Tanya has experience as a Recovery Coach, a Recovery Coach Trainer, a Certified Peer Specialist and Certified Peer Specialist Trainer, using her story of addiction and recovery to support all communities to discover hope and insight into new ways of living.  


Skye Boughman Headshot.jpg Skye Boughman has worked on the front line of the substance use and mental health epidemic in her work as the Clinical Director of ARC Community Services, Executive Director of Stop Heroin Now, a Wisconsin State Lead for the Recovery Advocacy Project, a therapist at Open Door Center for Change, the former Director of Drug Poisoning Prevention at Safe Communities, and the former Assistant Director of Connections Counseling. She specializes in working with teens and young adults suffering from opiate dependence and co-occurring mental health disorders and trauma. She was the chair of SCAODA's Ad Hoc Committee on 911 Good Samaritan Legislation, co-produced Straightforward: The Truth About Addiction and has contributed her own story of recovery to Waking Up Happy: A Handbook of Change with Memoirs of Recovery and Hope. 

 11 a.m.-Noon CST | Breakout Sessions 5-8

#5  Healing from Community-Wide Grief Part 2: A Deeper Dive Into Grief During COVID


Presenters: Tanya Kraege, CPS, CPS Trainer, Safe Communities MDC, Madison, Wis. and Skye Boughman, MS, LPC, CSAC, ARC Community Services, Madison, Wis.

Self care lies at the core of the work we do and if we are unable to work through some of the big feelings many us experience after personal or profession losses, we will leave the field or have challenges on our own recovery journeys. This session will focus on skills training for how we practice self care while experiencing grief and loss.

Learning Objectives:

  1. Participants will have opportunity to share practices that work for them while working through grief.
  2. Participants will gain knowledge of how to get through normal feelings of guilt.
  3. Participants will leave with a self care for when they are experiencing grief. 

Presenters Biography: Tanya Kraege is the Drug Poisoning Prevention Recovery Coach Team Manager at Safe Communities MDC and a mental health clinician at Journey Mental Health in the crisis unit. She specializes in working with people with substance use challenges, women using substances while pregnant, trauma, relationships and mental health challenges. Tanya has worked in the field of mental health and substance use for 13 years and currently oversees Recovery Coaches and Certified Peer Specialists who work in a variety of environments in Dane County to support people with SUD, MH and families affected by SUD and MH challenges. Tanya played a role in the Health Care Task Force on Safe Opioid Prescribing by participating in the academic detailing program for working with clinicians on co-prescribing Naloxone with opioid prescription medications. In addition to being a Clinical Social Worker, Clinical Substance Abuse Counselor and a community advocate, Tanya has experience as a Recovery Coach, a Recovery Coach Trainer, a Certified Peer Specialist and Certified Peer Specialist Trainer, using her story of addiction and recovery to support all communities to discover hope and insight into new ways of living.  

Skye Boughman has worked on the front line of the substance use and mental health epidemic in her work as the Clinical Director of ARC Community Services, Executive Director of Stop Heroin Now, a Wisconsin State Lead for the Recovery Advocacy Project, a therapist at Open Door Center for Change, the former Director of Drug Poisoning Prevention at Safe Communities, and the former Assistant Director of Connections Counseling. She specializes in working with teens and young adults suffering from opiate dependence and co-occurring mental health disorders and trauma. She was the chair of SCAODA's Ad Hoc Committee on 911 Good Samaritan Legislation, co-produced Straightforward: The Truth About Addiction and has contributed her own story of recovery to Waking Up Happy: A Handbook of Change with Memoirs of Recovery and Hope. 

#6  Intro to Intuitive Healing for Folx in Recovery


Presenter:
 La Espiritista, Goddexx, Brujx, Word Conjuror, Seattle, Wash.

This workshop is an introduction to intuitive healing for folx who are sober, sober-curious, and in recovery. The space aims to create a holistic environment for those seeking to learn more about energy medicine and intuition.

Learning Objectives: 

  1. Participants will begin developing a deeper trust to their inner knowing.
  2. Participants will deepen their awareness to their own intuition.
  3. Participants will learn about multiple concepts of energy work. 

Presenter Biography: La Espiritista (They/Goddexx) is a word conjurer, performer, and brujx based out of Seattle. They are the author and creative director of “Butterfly: Una Transformación,” a collection of poetry which provides a spiritual framework around the process of inner transformation through four phases of metamorphosis: release, renewal, retreat, rebirth. 

#7  Disability Justice and Mad Pride Interventions for Wellness, Healing, and Care


Presenter: Lydia X.Z. Brown, Director of Policy, Advocacy, and External Affairs

Disability Justice analysis and framework is crucial to abolitionist praxis and liberatory struggle, as ableism and sanism are embedded deeply within and dependent on structures of white supremacy, disaster capitalism, extraction/exploitation, and settler colonialism. This session will address ableism as a system of violence and oppression and offer Disability Justice & Mad Pride movement grounding and consciousness raising as vital interventions into ableist violence in our relationships, movement work, and political visioning. Participants will understand the nature of ableism, its interconnectedness with other systems of oppression, and the core principles of Disability Justice.

Learning Objectives: 

  1. Participants will be able to define ableism.
  2. Participants will be able to explain at least 3 principles of Disability Justice.
  3. Participants will be able to identify at least three strategies for community/collective care models grounded in Disability Justice and the Mad Pride Movement.

Presenter Biography: Lydia X. Z. Brown is an advocate, educator, and attorney addressing state and interpersonal violence targeting disabled people living at the intersections of race, class, gender, sexuality, faith, language, and nation. Lydia is Director of Policy, Advocacy, and External Affairs at the Autistic Women & Nonbinary Network. They are founding director of the Fund for Community Reparations for Autistic People of Color’s Interdependence, Survival and Empowerment. Lydia is adjunct lecturer/core faculty in Georgetown University’s Disability Studies Program, and adjunct professorial lecturer in American University’s Department of Critical Race, Gender, & Culture Studies.

#8  Starting Your Own Peer Recovery Business


Presenters:
 Michelle Uetz, Certified Parent Peer Specialist, Rocky Hill Parent Peer Specialist, LLC and Athena Agoudemos, Interim Director, Small Business Development Center, UW-Milwaukee

Finding work as a peer specialist can be difficult and discouraging. Starting your own business may be a better option but can also be difficult and daunting.  In addition to procuring contracts, there are many responsibilities and decisions to be made of a small business owner. This session will provide guidance, resources, and encouragement from a Parent Peer Specialist who has created her own business and the Director of the Small Business Development Center at UW-Stevens Point. Participants will be able to use the information to explore their individual situations and make the best choice for themselves.  

Learning Objectives:  

  1. Participants will list possible contracting options in WI for Peer Specialists.
  2. Participants will explain the responsibilities of owning one's own business.
  3. Participants will explore the option of starting their own peer recovery business with the resources provided.  

Presenter Biography: Michelle Uetz is a Certified Parent Peer Specialist and a CPPS Trainer. Michelle began her own business, Rocky Hill Parent Peer Specialists LLC, in 2018 to support families struggling with mental illness and substance use challenges. Michelle lives on a hobby farm in River Falls, Wis. with her three sons and husband. She gained lived experience when they had guardianship of her cousin's two girls for almost three years. In addition to contracting with CCS as a CPPS, Michelle is also a teacher for iForward teaching health and science courses for grades 6-12. Michelle is on the Certified Peer Specialist Advisory Committee and is a Co-Chair of the Employment Subcommittee.    

Athena Agoudemos is Interim Director at UW-Milwaukee Small Business Development Center (SBDC). Athena has worked with hundreds of entrepreneurs to help them start and grow their businesses. Her areas of expertise are in strategic planning, conflict resolution, financial management and project management. She is an engaged listener and creative problem solver who guides clients to take manageable and strategic steps forward in support of their goals. Prior to working at the SBDC, Athena worked as the Small Business Consultant Manager for WWBIC. She also held positions working as an Associate Director for a nonprofit that supported women in developing countries with microfinance, and was the Vice President of Retail for Stone Creek Coffee. 

 1-2 p.m. CST | Breakout Sessions 9-12

#9  No Justice, No Peace


Presenter: Clem Richardson, Professional Counselor, Speaker, Manna Behavioral Services, Corp.

This workshop will focus on the historical generational trauma that's been imposed on African American (Blacks) through-out the fiber of America. The intergenerational perspective will discuss how systemic laws and policies are still being bias toward Blacks. 

Learning Objectives: 

  1. Participants will be culturally relevant while being able to meet the client where they are at.
  2. Participants will learn how to counsel clients without being judgmental and placing their expectations on them.
  3. Participants will learn how generational trauma has impacted the clients. Participants will have a broad prospective on how to work with the client.

Presenter Biography: Clem L. Richardson is a Mental Health and Substance Abuse Therapist. He holds a Master's Degree from Concordia University (Mequon Campus) as a Professional Counselor in 2008.  He has a Bachelor of Science in Human Services from Upper Iowa University in 2004 and an Associate Degree in Theology from Grace Theological Seminary. He is also a Clinical Substance Abuse Counselor, CSAC, and a Master Addiction Counselor (MAC). He has been counseling people with addictions for more than 20 years where he utilizes many culture therapy styles and various counseling techniques that meet the needs of the individuals that he serves. Clem is the Founder/CEO of “Manna Behavioral Services,”  a nonprofit 501c3 organization, where he provides workshops and prevention education and facilitates adult and youth groups throughout the Milwaukee Community. Clem has received numerous awards such Rising Star Award, The Milwaukee Times Black Excellence Award in 2018, and the Most Involved Father Award, just to name a few.  Mr. Richardson is married to his beautiful wife of 7 years, Barbara Richardson. He is the proud father of 5 adult children, 4 daughters and 1 son, and he has 6 grandchildren. In his leisure time, he enjoys, reading, weight training, and traveling.

#10  Multiple Pathways of Advocacy


Presenter:
 Christma Rusch, Executive Director, BA, CPSS, Recovery Coach, Lighthouse Recovery Community Center, WI Recovery Advocacy Project  

Discover your pathway to advocacy. How do we come together as one voice to make real change in policies and beyond?

Learning Objectives:  

  1. Participants will understand there are different pathways to advocacy.
  2. Participants will be able to connect to their own pathway to advocacy.
  3. Participants will learn how to work with others who are working in advocacy to have the biggest impact.

Presenter Biography: Christma Rusch started out working in prevention and juvenile justice in 2010. She has become a Master ACE’s trainer with Saint E’s, Kids at Hope trainer, and a SMART Recovery facilitator for youth, and a recovery coach trainer. Christma is also someone who has been in long term recovery from Substance Use Disorder since 2005. She is a mother, a wife, a foster parent, an advocate, a sponsor, a recovery coach, a peer support specialist, and most recently the founder and director of the Lighthouse Recovery Community Center.

#11  Benefits, Work, and Mental Health


Presenters: Erica Bessert, Work Incentive Benefits Specialist, Employment Resources, Inc. and Ethan Hayes, Benefits Coordinator, Independent Living Resources

Many people with disability benefits have been told that they shouldn't work for fear of losing benefits they worked so hard to get in the first place. Join benefits specialists Erica and Ethan to hear about work incentives, the Medicaid Purchase Plan, and Erica's personal experience with how work has helped her recovery.

Learning Objectives: 

  1. Participants will build understanding to help end the myth that one cannot work if they're on disability benefits.
  2. Participants will consider positive attributes of working.
  3. Participants will learn about the Medicaid Purchase Plan. 

Presenter Biography: Erica Bessert has lived experience with mental health. When she felt there was no hope left, she learned about peer support. She worked with a peer specialist and realized recovery was possible. With that, she became a certified peer specialist. Realizing how important work is to mental health, her next work goal was to become a work incentives benefits specialist. She loves explaining how people with benefits can work and keep benefits if they choose.

Ethan Hayes has been working at Independent Living Resources since 2005.  He started doing Work Incentive Benefit reports in 2006.  Ethan has a bachelor's degree in Social Work from Viterbo University. From his experiences with working with individuals, he has seen the importance of work and the importance to be able to access health insurance.

#12  Telling YOUR Story Through Social Media


Presenter: 
Kody Green, Motivational Speaker and Mental Health Advocate, One Opportunity Hiring

In this workshop, Kody Green will talk about the power that social media can have in sharing YOUR story of mental illness, substance abuse, trauma, etc. Kody talks about the importance of using your story to help advocate and educate!  Kody used his personal story of developing schizophrenia, overcoming addiction, and life after incarceration to grow a TikTok following of over 1 million followers.  Whether you are a peer, a caregiver, or a CPS, you have a story worth sharing!

Learning Objectives: 

  1. Participants will learn the importance of sharing your story.
  2. Participants will learn the process of advocating on social media.
  3. Participants will learn how advocating online can help YOU and your peers. 

Presenter Biographies: Kody Green is a 26 year old with a diagnosis of Undifferentiated Schizophrenia.  Kody is also the founder of a non-profit, a motivational speaker, and content creator with over 1 million followers on TikTok.  He has struggled in the past with drug addiction, incarceration, and serious mental health issues.  In order to be a better advocate and speaker, Kody has been trained as a peer support specialist, recovery coach, and suicide prevention specialist.  Now, Kody shares his stories about his struggles and how to navigate through recovery, mental health issues, and life after incarceration.  He chooses to pursue motivational speaking and mental health advocacy for schizophrenia awareness, drug recovery, and second-chance opportunities because he has dealt with those struggles in his own life.

 2:30-3:30 p.m. CST | Breakout Sessions 13-16

#13  Introduction to Decolonized Recovery


Presenter: Carolyn Collado, Founding Steward, Recovery for the Revolution, Arlington, Va.

This workshop will be an introduction to the pillars of decolonized recovery, providing information on how addiction is connected with systemic oppression.  This session will cover what recovery can look like when systems recognize these factors and give us tools and community that center both healing from, and changing the forces of oppression.  

Learning Objectives:  

  1. Participants will learn the interconnectedness of addiction, trauma, and oppression.
  2. Participants will discover the connection of addiction/substance use issues to oppression while considering both domestic and global implications.
  3. Participants will explore how we heal individually and collectively from these deeply rooted historical factors that influence substance use issues, codependency, and addiction.  

Presenter Biography: Carolyn Collado (they/them) is a writer, decolonial dreamer, and founding steward of Recovery for the Revolution. They are a queer, non-binary Afro-Taino neurodivergent human in long-term recovery and believe recovery from a decolonized, anti-oppression lens can point the collective towards liberation. They name how intergenerational colonial trauma and the pressures of capitalism impact our relationship to self, each other, the planet, and the divine. They believe bringing to light what we have hidden in shame and fear can bring about transformative healing and community.  

#14  Business Ready


Presenters:
 Cheryl Vandenburgt, Program Director, Regional Office Coordinator, Loan Office, Kiva Capitol Access Manager, WWBIC; Mary Ellen Merchant; An Nguyen; and Michelle Sherbinow

Is entrepreneurism for you? Have questions about starting a business? Join the South Central WWBIC team, and have a meaningful conversation around starting a business, cash flow, and minority entrepreneurship.

Learning Objectives:  

  1. Participants will consider what it's like to be an entrepreneur.
  2. Participants will share about their business, or business goals, and have an open conversation with facilitators with opportunity to ask questions. 
  3. Participants will learn about additional resources to attendees. 

Presenter Biography: The South Central WBBIC's (Wisconsin Women’s Business Initiative Corporation) team is a group of professional individuals that are dedicated to creating economic opportunities to marginalized groups. At WWBIC, we focus on individuals who face barriers in accessing traditional financing or resources in pursuit of their dreams and economic well-being, in particular women, people of color, veterans and low-income individuals. Every day we work hard to achieve our social goal of improving the economic well-being of individuals by advancing inclusive entrepreneurship and facilitating self-sufficiency strategies. 

#15  Young Adult Mental Health Panel: What We Want You To Know


Presenter: Andrea Turtenwald, Family Relations Coordinator with Wisconsin Office of Children's Mental Health

Youth and young adults ages 16-26 serve as system change leaders as Lived Experience Partners with the Wisconsin Office of Children's Mental Health. Join this session to hear from young people across Wisconsin as they share their personal stories of experiencing mental health needs and their recommendations for providers and the children's mental health system.

Learning Objectives:  

  1. Participants will understand how young people would like to be involved in supporting their own social and emotional well-being.
  2. Participants will consider the perspective of young adults with mental health needs.
  3. Participants will recognize the interpersonal and system level changes that could be made to better support youth with mental health needs. 

Presenter Biography: Andrea Turtenwald has served Wisconsin youth, parents, and families for over ten years. Her professional experiences include youth development, child welfare case management, parent-empowerment program facilitation, and social-emotional learning program management. In 2016, Andrea earned her Master’s degree in Public Service from Marquette University. Andrea’s personal journey includes managing ADHD, self-harm, depression, anxiety, and navigating parenthood as a new mom. Andrea joined the Wisconsin Office of Children’s Mental Health in 2018, and she is honored to use her role to raise up the voices of those with lived experience.

#16  Strengthening Families and Systems


Presenter:
 Maxine Jacobs, Birth/Foster/Adoptive Parent

This presentation will provide the tools to safely guide the child/family towards building a stronger and healthier relationship utilizing evidenced-based practices.  Focusing on "what happened to you" and not "what did you do" and truly understanding this concept is key.   

Learning Objectives:  

  1. Participants will identify 3 items in the child's invisible suitcase.
  2. Participants will identify how and why past traumas influence behaviors. 
  3. Participants will identify and understand 4 tools used to help mitigate undesired behaviors. 

Presenter Biography: Maxine Jacobs has been a foster parent off and on since 1977.  In 2013. she has worked with La Crosse County in implementing Trauma Informed Parenting based on the TFCBT model and co-facilitated Strengthening Families and Systems (formally Trauma Informed Care).  Maxine is married with seven children, five of whom were adopted through foster care.  In addition to teaching, she also mentors foster families who have children with acute trauma.  

 5-6 p.m. CST l DRW's Mental Health Advocacy Assistance: Information and Listening Session

The Disability Rights Wisconsin PAIMI Advisory Council Invites You to a Virtual Event!

DRW's Mental Health Advocacy Assistance: Information and Listening Session  

  1. Learn about DRW's mental health advocacy assistance and systemic work.
  2. Share your ideas on the supports you think are most important for people with mental health needs to support their recovery and live successfully in the community.
  3. Provide your suggested priorities for DRW's mental health advocacy.

Pre-registration is required! Captioning and ASL Interpretation will be provided. 

Download Information and Listening Session Flyer.

Friday, August 20, 2021

 8:15-8:45 a.m. CST | Friday Facilitated Networking

Facilitated Networking

This Networking session is an invitation to explore, discuss, and develop our understanding of the term, disability. We will look at the concept thorough a strength-based lens. Then, we will discuss how our ideas of disability influence our work as peer professionals and the way we see our peers. Examples will be offered to support a developing understanding. Facilitated by Kyle Wicks.

BIPOC Roundtable is a place for peers who self identify as Black Indigenous or other persons of color to connect and focus on topics and experiences that impact them as CPS and CPPS throughout Wisconsin. Facilitated by Tara Wilhelmi of EOTO Culturally Rooted.

 9-10 a.m. CST | Breakout Sessions 17-20

#17  Simple & Quick Cognitive Behavioral Interventions


Presenter: Jason Chapman, CPS and Program Coordinator, JusticePoint

Cognitive Behavioral Therapy has been shown to be highly effective in helping individuals recover from mental health and addiction. Luckily, many of these interventions are simple and can be applied in a non-clinical format. This presentation will teach the basic principles of CBT and showcase some simple CBT based worksheets that participants can use.  

Learning Objectives: 

  1. Participants will discuss the difference between clinical and non-clinical interventions and how to align non-clinical interventions to peer support values.
  2. Participants will learn the basic foundations and best practices for CBT work.
  3. Participants will see examples of worksheets they can use themselves or with their consumers/clients.

Presenter Biography: Jason Chapman is a program coordinator for cognitive behavioral programming, trauma informed programming, and peer support for JusticePoint's Milwaukee Court programs. He has facilitated several thousand hours of cognitive behavioral programming and is a trainer for several programs. He lives with bipolar disorder. 

#18  Mental Health So White


Presenter:
 Allisia Fernandez, Peer Specialist, Policy and Advocacy Senior, Jamaica, N.Y.

Mental Health was colonized and in doing so, marginalized folks were negatively impacted. Marginalized folks often deal with punitive measures far more extreme than their white counter parts such as death by police brutality. 

Learning Objectives:   

  1. Participants will learn about the freedom of mental health in marginalized communities prior colonization.
  2. Participants will understand more about the impact of Mental Health colonization.
  3. Participants will consider the ways current Mental Health is so white, cis, straight and ableist.

Presenter Biography: Allisia Fernandez is a mental health and disability advocate and activist. She is currently Advocacy and Policy Senior at EnDependence Center of Northern Virginia, member of the Sylvia Rivera Law Project's Shelter Organizing Team and Tenant Organizer for Met Council. Allisia has provided consultation to companies such as Facebook and Lionsgate and currently is a board member of the National Council on Independent Living, DREAM and ISPS-US. She is also a Peer Specialist in Lenox Hills Hospital and aspiring lawyer. 

#19  Lost in the Dairyland - Part 1


Presenter: Denise Johnson, Wisconsin Statewide Project Coordinator SUD/MH Services for People who are Deaf, Deaf-Blind and Hard of Hearing, Independence First

This presentation will help participants to understand the Deaf Culture, Language Deprivation, and communication needs of people who are Deaf, Deaf-Blind, and Hard of Hearing. The participants will also learn some of the unique substance use and mental health recovery barriers this population faces. 

Learning Objectives: 

  1. Participants will increase their knowledge on best practices when working with people who are Deaf, Hard-of-Hearing, or Deaf-Blind.
  2. Participants will have a deeper understanding of the complex communication involved when working with this people who are who are Deaf, Hard-of-Hearing, or Deaf-Blind.
  3. Participants will learn about resources available to support peers who are who are Deaf, Hard-of-Hearing, or Deaf-Blind. 

Presenter Biography: Denise Johnson, BSW, is a Deaf professional working in collaboration with the eight Independent Living Centers (ILCs) in Wisconsin. The project is funded by the State of Wisconsin Department of Health Services, the Division of Substance Abuse and Mental Health. Denise has dedicated her career to advocating for and with persons with disabilities who live with a substance use and mental health illness concerns, especially those who are Deaf, Hard-of-Hearing, and Deaf-Blind.  Denise has more than 23 years of experience working in the field. She serves on the Wisconsin State Council on Alcohol and Other Drug Abuse (SCAODA) Diversity Sub-Committee, is the Vice President of American Deafness and Rehabilitation Association (ADARA), and Chair of Independence First's group-Deaf Access Consumer Advocacy Team. Denise is one of the co-founding members and currently Board President of Deaf Unity in Wisconsin.  

#20 Responding to Death and Loss in Peer Support Work


Presenter:
 Victoria (Vic) Welle, Activist, Psychiatric Survivor

Peer support work involves coping with loss. It can range from saying goodbye when support services come to an end, to unexpected deaths from suicide or overdose. This workshop will provide tools for self-reflection and explore strategies for navigating grief and loss.

Learning Objectives: 

  1. Participants will be able to identify the ways in which loss and death have impacted their peer support work.
  2. Participants will explore their beliefs about and reactions to loss and death.
  3. Participants will examine strategies for responding to loss and death.

Presenter Biography: Victoria (Vic) Welle is an activist, psychiatric survivor, and once-aspiring minister who is passionate about creating non-coercive, culturally sensitive support for people experiencing emotional distress. A strong proponent of peer support, Vic is a trainer for Intentional Peer Support and the Wisconsin Peer Specialist Employment Initiative. Vic also serves as the board chair Wisconsin Milkweed Alliance (WIMA), a peer-run organization that operates Monarch House Peer Run Respite, a non-clinical crisis alternative operated by people with lived experience of mental health, substance use, or other life-interrupting challenges.

 10:30-11:30 a.m. CST | Breakout Sessions 21-24

#21  Alternative Crisis Response: Building Radical Peer Support Collectives + Mutual Aid Networks in our Communities


Presenter: Stefanie Lyn Kaufman-Mthimkhulu, Executive Director of Project LETS, Providence, R.I.

Peer support must be grounded in a critical social justice, anti-racist, abolitionist, and Disability Justice lens that centers healing and care work. In this breakout workshop, we’ll explore building peer support collectives outside of the system (in our communities, workplaces, and educational settings) and work to imagine new support structures that align with our values and ethics. We’ll reflect on how these collectives can support de-carceral emotional care and mutuality among marginalized folks— and interrogate how the mental health industrial complex (MHIC) can never give us all of the tools to heal in the ways we deserve. We’ll ask ourselves: how do we build community-based alternatives and response networks that prioritize multiply marginalized Disabled/mad/mentally ill/neurodivergent folks and keep our community members out of carceral institutions? This will be an interactive skill-building and visionary space, led by folks with lived experience of neurodivergence and psychiatric incarceration.

Learning Objectives: 

  1. Participants will be able to define ableism.
  2. Participants will be able to explain at least three principles of Disability Justice.
  3. Participants will be able to identify at least three strategies for community/collective care models grounded in Disability Justice and the Mad Pride Movement.

Presenter Biography: Stefanie Lyn Kaufman-Mthimkhulu (they/she) is a Disability Justice cultural worker, educator, organizer, parent, somatic and ancestral healing practitioner, consultant, writer, and the Executive Director of Project LETS — a national grassroots organization led by and for folks with lived experience of mental illness, madness, disability, and neurodivergence. Their work specializes in building peer support collectives and community mental health care structures outside of the state. Stefanie comes to their work from the positionality of being white, Latinx, Jewish, mad, autistic, disabled, and a survivor of psychiatric incarceration. They have extensive experience as a facilitator, curriculum developer, and consultant for mental health policies, program development, and access-centered practices. Stefanie is invested in disrupting multiple carceral systems which disproportionately harm and kill our community members worldwide.

#22  Cultural Competency in BDSM and Non-Monogamy


Presenter:
 Jason Chapman, CPS and Program Coordinator, JusticePoint

The BDSM and ethically non-monogamous community is still highly stigmatized and many individuals within this community choose not to seek mental health assistance because their identity is viewed as a condition to be treated - similar to how the LGBTQ+ community has been treated. This presentation will dispel some myths about the BDSM and ENM communities and talk about ways to find common ground with individuals who identify this way.

Learning Objectives:   

  1. Participants will have the opportunity to debunk common myths about the BDSM and ENM community and have some of their questions answered.
  2. Participants will learn about common terms and ideas that are foundational to the BDSM and ENM community.
  3. Participants will discuss ways to navigate difficult, sensitive, and uncomfortable conversations with their peers.

Presenter Biography: Jason Chapman is a program coordinator for cognitive behavioral programming, trauma informed programming, and peer support for JusticePoint's Milwaukee Court programs. He has facilitated several thousand hours of cognitive behavioral programming and is a trainer for several programs. He lives with bipolar disorder. 

#23  Motivational Interviewing: REALLY Helping by Listening for Murmurs and Shouts of Change Talk


Presenters: Laura Saunders, MSSW, Program Coordinator, Great Lakes ATTC and MHTTC, Program Coordinator, University of Wisconsin-Madison, College of Engineering, Madison, Wis. and Kris Kelly,  Project Manager, Peer Recovery Center of Excellence, University of Wisconsin-Madison, CHESS/Great Lakes Addiction, Mental Health, and Prevention Technology Transfer Centers, Madison, Wis.

In this highly interactive workshop, we'll explore the concepts of change talk and sustain talk.  Hearing and responding to change talk and sustain talk is key to the intentional use of the evidence based practice of Motivational Interviewing.  Encouraging change talk in others translates to increased likelihood that the person will change.

Learning Objectives: 

  1. Participants will recognize person change talk versus sustain talk.
  2. Participants will discuss strategies for eliciting change and minimizing sustain talk in people.
  3. Participants will select a few strategies to add to your helping tools to encourage change talk in people.

Presenters Biography: Laura A. Saunders, MSSW is with the University of Wisconsin-Madison, School of Engineering and an independent consultant. Since 2001, Laura has designed, facilitated, and delivered MI training and coaching in person, online, and via distance learning in the fields of health care, human services, public health, and criminal justice. She has provided feedback and coaching to hundreds of learners who are interested in using evidence based practices to fidelity.  Laura has also conducted train the trainer events. She joined the International group of Motivational Interviewing Network of Trainers (MINT) in 2006 and is an active Member of Wisconsin Motivational interviewing group.

Kris Kelly is the Project Manager Peer Recovery Center of Excellence for the Great Lakes Addiction, Mental Health, and Prevention Technology Transfer Centers and subject matter expert on Peer-Based Recovery Support Services. She's worked with state and local government organizations, recovery community organizations, recovery high schools, treatment courts, withdrawal management/detoxification centers, and clinical treatment facilities developing best practices for integrating recovery supports into systems and services. As a former ED and Director of Programs of a Minnesota-based Recovery Community Organization, Kris was a leader in the peer support movement in Minnesota. Kris has presented at state and national conferences on topics ranging from supervision in peer-based recovery support services, integrating peer support services into behavioral health organizations, and recovery-oriented systems of care. As a woman in long-term recovery, she was drawn to integrative wellness, exploring recovery through mindfulness, yoga, and meditation. She finds deep alignment between a person-centered approach to recovery and her personal values.

#24  Lost in the Dairyland - Part 2


Presenter:
 Denise Johnson, Wisconsin Statewide Project Coordinator SUD/MH Services for People who are Deaf, Deaf-Blind and Hard of Hearing, Independence First

This presentation will help participants to understand the Deaf Culture, Language Deprivation, and communication needs of people who are Deaf, Deaf-Blind, and Hard of Hearing. The participants will also learn some of the unique substance use and mental health recovery barriers this population faces. 

Learning Objectives: 

  1. Participants will increase their knowledge on best practices when working with people who are who are Deaf, Hard-of-Hearing, or Deaf-Blind.
  2. Participants will have a deeper understanding of the complex communication involved when working with people who are Deaf, Hard-of-Hearing, or Deaf-Blind.
  3. Participants will learn about resources available to support peers who are who are Deaf, Hard-of-Hearing, or Deaf-Blind. 

Presenter Biography: Denise Johnson, BSW, is a Deaf professional working in collaboration with the eight Independent Living Centers (ILCs) in Wisconsin. The project is funded by the State of Wisconsin Department of Health Services, the Division of Substance Abuse and Mental Health. Denise has dedicated her career to advocating for and with persons with disabilities who live with a substance use and mental health illness concerns, especially those who are Deaf, Hard-of-Hearing, and Deaf-Blind.  Denise has more than 23 years of experience working in the field. She serves on the Wisconsin State Council on Alcohol and Other Drug Abuse (SCAODA) Diversity Sub-Committee, is the Vice President of American Deafness and Rehabilitation Association (ADARA), and Chair of Independence First’s group-Deaf Access Consumer Advocacy Team. Denise is one of the co-founding members and currently Board President of Deaf Unity in Wisconsin.  

 Noon-1:30 p.m. CST | Closing Keynote: Stefanie Lyn Kaufman-Mthimkhulu

We Keep Us Safe: An Abolitionist + Disability Justice Approach to Peer Support


Presenter: Stefanie Lyn Kaufman-Mthimkhulu, Executive Director of Project LETS, Providence, R.I. 

From its beginning in the US, peer support was an informal, unstructured, mutual aid effort that rose out of the tireless organizing of psychiatric survivors and ex-patients who had been harmed and abused by the mental health system. Peer support, as it was originally imagined, practiced cross-movement solidarity— and was heavily influenced by the Civil Rights Movement, queer/trans liberation work, and the Independent Living/Disability Rights movement. When we look at our history, it is clear that peer support has political roots— but today’s professionalized peer support roles are often co-opted by the system, and lack a critical social justice, anti-racist, abolitionist, and Disability Justice centered approach towards healing and care work.

In this Keynote address, Stefanie will explore the roots of peer support as mutual aid care work, using peer support skills outside of the system, how the mental health system (including peer support specialists) is reliant upon and complicit with prisons and policing, and how to work towards abolitionist reforms within the system. As they offer a new vision grounded in values and ethics of collective liberation, Stefanie will ask, how do we build community-based care networks that prioritize multiply marginalized Disabled, mad, mentally ill, and neurodivergent folks? How do we create the conditions to keep our community members out of confinement and carceral institutions? And most importantly: who is doing this work now, and where do we go from here?

Learning Objectives: 

  • Participants will explore and become familiar with existing radical networks of decarceral emotional care that build on the roots of peer support as an abolitionist mutual aid offering.
  • Participants will investigate our complicity in the Mental Health Industrial Complex (MHIC) and challenge ourselves to commit to self-assessing our transformation going forward.
  • Participants will reflect on why peer support workers need to connect ourselves to the larger Disability Justice movement and practice cross-movement solidarity. 

Presenter Biography: 

SLKM - Headshot.jpegStefanie Lyn Kaufman-Mthimkhulu (they/she) is a Disability Justice cultural worker, educator, organizer, parent, somatic and ancestral healing practitioner, consultant, writer, and the Executive Director of Project LETS — a national grassroots organization led by and for folks with lived experience of mental illness, madness, disability, and neurodivergence. Their work specializes in building peer support collectives and community mental health care structures outside of the state. Stefanie comes to their work from the positionality of being white, Latinx, Jewish, mad, autistic, disabled, and a survivor of psychiatric incarceration. They have extensive experience as a facilitator, curriculum developer, and consultant for mental health policies, program development, and access-centered practices. Stefanie is invested in disrupting multiple carceral systems which disproportionately harm and kill our community members worldwide.

​Conference Information

 ‭(Hidden)‬ Peer Scholarships-Applications accepted now!


Scholarships are available for Wisconsin peers, or their allies, who require financial assistance to attend the Virtual WI Peer Recovery Conference August 18-20, 2021.  Scholarships are available for the full amount of conference registration ($75).

Complete the Scholarship Application Form by July 7, 2021 if you would like to be considered for a scholarship.  Please note that there may be a limited number fo scholarships.  Please only seek a scholarship if you require financial assistance.

DO NOT REGISTER for the conference if you are submitting a scholarship application!  If you are awarded a scholarship, instructions will be sent by email with specific registration information no later than July 15, 2021.  

If you have any questions, please email Chelsey.MyhreFoster@ilresources.org or call 608-787-1111.




 Continuing Education Hours (CEHs)

Continuing Education Hours are a measure of participation in continuing education programs. Individuals should consult with their professional association and/or licensing board regarding the applicability of the conference for their profession. It is the individual's responsibility to report CEHs earned to their appropriate credential or licensing board.

The 2021 conference has been approved for a maximum total of 10.5 CEHs by the University of Wisconsin-Stevens Point Department of Sociology. A link will be provided after the conference for registrants to receive a printable, personalized CEH Certificate of Completion via email.

 2022 Call for Proposals

What are we looking for?

Proposals that align with our track objectives and/or demonstrate evidenced-based practices, support various pathways of recovery, as well as highlight the direct inclusion of people with lived experience following the movement of Peer Support, WI Certified Peer Specialists, and Certified Parent Peer Specialists are encouraged to apply.  For more information, click on the Workshop Proposal Submission button.

Proposals are due by 11:59 PM CST Friday, March 4, 2022.

If you have any questinos regarding the proposal submission process, please contact the Conference Coordinator via phone at 608.787.1111 or email advocacy@ilresources.org.

2022 WI Peer Recovery Conference Planning Committee Interest




If you are interested in joining the 2022 WI Peer Recovery Conference Planning Committee please complete this form. When a 2022 Conference Coordinator is selected you will be contacted and informational meetings, and more details will be shared. In the meantime questions can be sent to Advocacy@ilresources.org.

 Minimum Computer Standards

Participants are responsible for ensuring they have the minimum computer standards for participating in the virtual conference via Zoom.  Zoom works best with Chrome or Firefox. UW-Stevens Point is not responsible for participant technological issues including, but not limited to, inadequate bandwidth and/or registrant equipment malfunction. 

Zoom Tutorial

Need help with using Zoom? Click here for our Zoom Tutorial Help page! Click here to download Zoom Client for Meetings. 

​​ ​

Contact Information


For questions about the conference, contact Nicole Ravens, Conference Coordinator:
Nicole Ravens, Conference Coordinator
Independent Living Resources
608-787-1111

For assistance with conference registration, email uwspce-conf@uwsp.edu or call Continuing Education at 715-346-3838.  


2021 Cancellation Policy 


Full refunds granted upon receipt of written request to uwspce-conf@uwsp.edu. Cancellation requests must be received by Friday, August 13, 2021.  No refunds will be given on or after Saturday, August 14, 2021. Substitutions can be made at any time, but no shows will be responsible for the full conference fee.  

______________________________________________________________________________________________________

Reasonable accommodations for persons with disabilities will be made if requested at least two weeks in advance. 
Please contact Continuing Education at 715-346-3838 or uwspceweb@uwsp.edu.