17th Annual FOCUS Breakout Sessions

FOCUS 2018 Special Session
"The Art and Science of Mental Health"
November 14, 2018

FOCUS 2018 Conference
November 15, 2018

 Keynote: Wednesday, November 14, 2018  8:30-9:45 a.m.

There's No Health Without Mental Health
Mettie Spiess, BS, CWP​

In this uniquely empowering keynote, attendees recognize the power of their voice and how to effectively use it to be an advocate for themselves and their patients. The evolution of mental wellness in the workplace and how to create supportive stigma-free work environments is also discussed. Spiess will lead you on a journey of personal reflection resulting in contagious courage and resilience.

During this presentation you will learn:

1. The two keys to igniting a stigma-free mental health movement.
2. How to use the “Three Pillars of Impact” (Voice. Value. Vigilance) to support the mental health and wellbeing of every resident.
3. Creative strategies to change everyday conversations to reduce stigma and lower workplace anxiety.

Wednesday, November 14
Breakout Sessions: "A" Series 10:15-11:45 a.m.  

Choose one from this series:

A1
Taking Care of You: Anxiety Relief That Works!
Mettie Spiess, BS, CWP

This session is full and no longer available for registration
This session is for all providers

Even if you do not have a diagnosed anxiety condition, we all struggle with periods of anxiety that can send our hearts racing and make our heads spin. In this “A-HA” producing session, you will practice proven coping techniques that will decrease your personal and professional stress. This session is active, reflective, and hands-on.

During this presentation you will learn:
 
1. How to overcome the three most common anxiety traps to take control of your personal and professional life.
2. Ways to increase your confidence and reduce stress with aligned posture and breathing techniques you can adopt into your daily routine.
3. How to use the surprising benefits of controlled anxiety to your advantage (yes, it's possible).
 
A2
Trauma-Informed Care in Mental Illness
Scott Webb, MSE, LCSW

This session is full and no longer available for registration
This session is for all providers

Trauma-informed care is an intervention and organizational approach that focuses on how trauma may affect an individual’s life and their response to receiving behavioral health services. This presentation will explore trauma and its prevalence in society. We will review the adverse childhood experiences study and how the five values of trauma-informed care drive connection and can be applied in multiple service settings.

During this presentation you will learn:

1. To define and identify the types of trauma.
2. The significance of the Adverse Childhood Experiences study as it relates to mental illness.
3. How to articulate what trauma-informed care is, and be able to identify the five pillars of trauma-informed culture change for an organization.
 
A3 Caregiver High-Wire Act: Balancing Self-Preservation and Care
Brenda Avadian, BA, MA

This session is for all providers

Day after day, we expect professional caregivers to provide quality and compassionate care.  Families, care recipients, fellow staff members and leaders make a big difference in how the caregiver carries out responsibilities. Responding to the care recipient’s needs, the caregiver must balance on the shaky high-wire of care, sometimes (often times?) with minimal support. Each person who receives care requires a caregiver to walk across a different high wire. In this session we will explore proven solutions to balance self-preservation with caregiving responsibilities. These will mitigate the cumulative and damaging effects on care quality, caregiver mental and emotional health, and retention, while raising family satisfaction.

During this presentation you will learn:

1. Greater self-awareness of emotional, mental, and physical states during the caregiving process.
2. Communication strategies, incorporating humor and inclusive language, to promote empowering interactions with care recipients, family members, and fellow team members.
3. How situational awareness and initiating interactions with family, staff, and leaders will mitigate negative effects on mental health while raising retention and care quality.

A4​ Geriatric Depression in Assisted Living and Nursing Home Facilities: Under-diagnosed, Undertreated and with Devastating Consequences
Dr. Joseph Goveas, MD

This session is full and no longer available for registration
This session is for all providers

The presenter will address the epidemiology and clinical presentation of geriatric depression; and the adverse consequences of under recognition and under treatment of geriatric depression. 

During this pesentation you will learn:

1. The epidemiology of Geriatric Depression in long-term care settings.
2. The clinical presentation of Geriatric Depression in long-term care settings.
3. To appreciate the adverse consequences of under recognition and under treatment of geriatric depression in long-term care settings.
A5​
Assessment and Implementation of Strategies to Deal with Challenging Families
Dr. Robert Figlerski

This session is full and no longer available for registration
This session is for all providers

Most family members of residents in post-acute facilities have a highly positive impact on both resident and staff. Some, unfortunately, adopt an adversarial stance towards the facility to the detriment of the resident, staff and all involved. This session is a comprehensive examination of the issues involved combined with a solution-focused approach.

During this presentation you will learn:

1. The dynamics of family engagement and satisfaction.
2. Strategies for fostering improved family-facility connectedness.
3. Solutions to common negative family reactions and challenging family members.

A6​
Verbal and Non Verbal De-escalation of Agitated or Violent Persons
Elizabeth Masanz, RN, DON
This session is for all providers
 
This session will explore verbal and non-verbal actions and techniques to train caregivers the skills to safely and effectively respond to anxious, hostile, or violent behavior to resolve potentially dangerous situations. We will explore situations from the agitated or violent person's perspective.  This session is focused on health care workers and does not teach techniques used by law enforcement, which may involve using either physical force or a weapon. Learn to organize your thinking about how behavior escalates and how to respond appropriately during moments of chaos.
During this presentation you will learn:

1. How our behaviors, actions and attitudes impact the situations with patients in crisis.
2. How to identify escalation of agitation and when to intervene with different approaches by preventing injury.
3. About assessing, planning and training for a bad situation.
A7
The Language of Help and Healing
Dr. Ron Diamond, MD

This session is for all providers

The words we use as clinicians have the power to influence how we see the world and how we relate to our patients.  The words we use can help us develop a more effective relationship with our patients, and words can also make that relationship more difficult.  Our words can help instill hope, or make hope more difficult.  Words are not just what we say to others, but what we say to ourselves in our own thoughts.  Word are how we come to understand and think about our patients and their concerns.  This session will discuss some of the  words that we commonly use as clinicians.  It will allow us to reexamine some of these words, and how we can use words to be more effective in our work with clients. 

During this presentation you will learn:

1. To examine their own communication styles and gain an understanding of the impact of their words on well-being and relationships.
2. The words they use can sometimes portray how they think about and respond to others.
3. To reexamine word choices, and assimilate how words can be used to be more effective in work and relationships.
 
A8 Equal but Different: The Hidden Epidemic of Chemical Use and Abuse in People 55+ Brenda Iliff, MA, LADC, CAC, CMAT

This session is for all providers

An increasing number of adults 55+ are using and misusing chemicals or struggling with addiction. Besides alcohol, the use of prescription drugs in this population is skyrocketing and illicit drugs aren’t far behind. Alcohol and drug problems in this populations have been historically underestimated and understudied. Because in many cases, the symptoms of substance use can mimic medical concerns, many times the addiction is missed and the chaos and health declines continue. This session will share insights into identifying addiction concerns and provide innovative methods to intervene.  You’ll learn the most up-to-date, effective and evidence-based methods to help your residents and their families.  We will explore the unique risks people over 55 face in becoming addicted and the unique resources they bring to a healthier life.

During this presentation you will learn:

1. To recognize the prevalence of chemical misuse in people over 55.
2. To recognize medical concerns that substance misuse can mimic in older adults.
3. To identify interventions, ongoing case-management needs and barriers to addressing substance misuse and addiction in older adults.

A9 Mental Health Ethics in Long-Term Care Dr. Michael Gillette, PhD

This session is for all providers

This highly interactive case-based session will examine a series of ethical issues that arise when managing mental health issues and mental illness in the long-term care environment.  While long-term care communities have historically often avoided many of these issues by excluding individuals from service whose primary diagnosis is mental illness, pressures to respect the desire to age in place, an increased emphasis on personal autonomy, and a de-stigmatization of mental illness have created increasing expectations that serious mental illness is not a barrier to continued placement in long term care. This session will explore a variety of ethical issues that emerge in this context by examining the interplay of autonomy and professional responsibility throughout the continuum of care.

During this presentation you will learn:

1. To define the relevant concepts of autonomy and the limits of professional responsibility.
2. To define the ethical justification and limits of paternalistic intervention to prevent harm to self specifically as it relates to mental illness, dementia and addiction.
3. To define the ethical justification and limits of justice-based intervention to prevent harm to others by considering the proper role of the professional in protecting the welfare of all individuals living within a particular environment.
4. To define the proper professional role of providers in dealing with issues that might lie outside their areas of competence and expertise.
 
A10Safety Day: A Trauma-Informed Approach to Approaching Mandatory Hoarding Clean OutsLeslie Shapiro, MA, LMFTA

This session is for all providers

Hoarding disorder is a mental health condition that has individual and public safety implications. As in communities, providers who clean out resident spaces repeatedly get frustrated by the lack of permanent change.  This results in relationship losses for the individual who hoards and also affects their family members, friends, care providers as well as other residents. In the end, we are back to where we started - a home that is hoarded and unsafe for the resident and the public. Unless we address both the mental health disorder and the public safety concerns, we will not have sustainable and effective treatment that supports the person who hoards and those who are impacted by their behaviors.

During this presentation you will learn:

1. Current community responses to hoarding do not work and learn of a more effective, sustainable and affordable approach to hoarding cleanouts.
2. A harm reduction approach – helpful for individual with cognitive impairments or for people who are unwilling to seek treatment.
3. Application of Disaster Psychology to Hoarding Cleanout Interventions and the safety Day Intervention Process - to minimize the damage when hoarding cleanouts are necessary.

Wednesday, November 14
Breakout Sessions: "B" Series 12:45-2:15 p.m.  

Choose one from this series:

B1 Key Issues in Late Life Mental Illness
Dr. Susanne Waters Castillo, MSSW, PhD

This session is for all providers

Both geriatric depression and anxiety occur in late life, but are often not reported resulting in serious health outcomes.  This session will discuss mental health in aging as well as reasons why depressive and anxious symptoms are often not reported in older adults. Evidence-based treatments will be discussed including a case study used to apply information covered in this session.

During this presentation you will learn:

1. Characteristics of mental well-being in late life and why geriatric mental illness is under reported.
2. To identify unique symptoms of most prevalent psychiatric illness in late life.
3. Evidence-based treatment approaches.

B2
Managing Personality Disorders
Dr. David Mays, PhD

This session is full and no longer available for registration
This session is for all providers

Individuals with “difficult” personalities can make everything about work, shall we say, less joyful. This session will provide a useful guide to understanding the most common personality disorders (antisocial, borderline, dependent, narcissistic) and will offer tips on managing people and situations when everything gets unnecessarily complicated.

During this presentation you will learn:
1. The characteristic styles of the most common personality disorders.
2. How to anticipate problems that occur when working with individuals who have personality disorders.
3. Strategies for dealing with people whose personality style is complicating your effort to provide treatment and support.
B3
Adapting the Zero Suicide Framework to Long-Term Care Settings:  Debunking the Myths and Understanding the Facts
Shel Gross, MPA
Kenneth Wagman, RN

This session is for all providers

This session will identify specific policies and practices to improve suicide prevention activities in long-term care facilities. Attendees will leave the session with concrete actions they can take in their facilities along with an understanding of a broader quality improvement framework for suicide prevention and a list of resources to support additional activities.

During this presentation you will learn:

1. Current best practices to identify and intervene with residents who present at risk for suicide.
2. How to develop an engaging training program for suicide prevention in their own facilities.
3. How to locate additional suicide prevention resources for the purpose of policy/procedure development and staff training.

B4 Treatment of Geriatric Depression

Dr. Joseph Goveas, MD

This session is for all providers

The presenter will address methods to improve depression care, clinical evaluation and treatment of geriatric depression in continuing retirement communities. Treatment advances in geriatric depression will be discussed.


During this presentation you will learn:

1. How to improve depression care in long-term care settings.
2. How to clinically evaluate a geriatric patient with depression.
3. The currently available treatment options and prognosis of geriatric depression in long-term care settings.

B5
Understanding and Responding to Unwanted Behaviors
Dr. Robert Figlerski

This session is full and no longer available for registration
This session is for all providers

There are myriad sources of unwanted behavior in post-acute facilities. Many residents have pre-existing psychiatric disorders; others evidence the behavioral symptoms of dementia. This session will focus on non-pharmacologic strategies for managing unwanted behaviors in the post-acute setting.

During this presentation you will learn:

1. The underpinnings of unwanted and challenging behaviors.
2. Evidence-based strategies for managing unwanted behaviors.
3. How to do Gradual Dosage Reductions in conjunction with non-pharmacological interventions to achieve optimal results.

B6
Medication Use in Skilled Nursing Facilities for Mental Health Issues
Holly Altenberger, PharmD, RPh
This session is full and no longer available for registration
This session is for nursing home providers

The first half of this session will focus on disease states and which medications are used (approved and off-label) for each of those. A general overview of mental health medications will be given. This will include side effects and interactions to be aware of as well as what hurdles we see with those medications. The second half will focus on how to stay compliant with mental health medications. This will include proper documentation in patient’s charts and Medication Administration Record (MAR) as well as monthly, quarterly and annual reports needed. Lastly, new federal regulations in skilled nursing facilities relating to mental health medications will be discussed.
 
During this presentation you will learn:
 
1. Disease states that mental health medications are used to treat.
2. About mental health medications including but not limited to names, classes, mechanism of actions, side effects and interactions.
3. State and federal skilled nursing facilities regulations related to mental health medications and will have a better understanding of how to stay compliant with those regulations.
B7
Mental Health Care at the End of Life: Focus on the Patient
Dr. Anthony Braus, MD

This session is for all providers

Residents and their families have pressing needs at the end of life. The most fundamental is to find comfort, security, and connectedness.  Syndromes of mental illness may be a barrier to addressing these needs, and mental health care can be the vehicle for meeting these needs.

During this presentation you will learn:
 
1. Major psychiatric syndromes at the end of life: anxiety, depression, delirium, cognitive decline, and grief.
2. Treatment approaches; new and old pharmacology, psychotherapies.
3. To incorporate families into end of life care.
 
B8
Repeat - Equal but Different: The Hidden Epidemic of Chemical Use and Abuse in People 55+
Brenda Iliff, MA, LADC, CAC, CMAT


This session is a repeat, see A8 for the summary of the presentation.

B9
Repeat - Mental Health Ethics in Long-Term Care
Dr. Michael Gillette, PhD


This session is a repeat, see A9 for the summary of the presentation.

B10
Hoarding and the Aging Population
Leslie Shapiro, MA, LMFTA

This session is for all providers

Hoarding behavior is a unique mental health condition that has long been misunderstood, undiagnosed, and untreated. People who hoard most often do not reach out for help. Over time, they may become socially isolated and lose their ability to function in daily life. Their unwillingness to part with possessions, even those perceived by others as having no value, can try the patience of friends and family members. Hoarding Disorder particularly effects the aging population.

During this presentation you will learn:
 
1. Background information on Hoarding Disorder and assessment.
2. The challenges with Hoarding Disorder and older adults.
3. Main Brain Functioning Differences in Individuals with Hoarding Disorder and treatment options.

 

Wednesday, November 14
Breakout Sessions: "C" Series 2:30-4:00 p.m.  

Choose one from this series:

C1 The Opioid Epidemic in Wisconsin Paul Krupski, BA
This session is full and no longer available for registration
This session is for all providers

Opioid misuse and abuse is a major issue nationally, with prescription opioid addiction being one of the biggest drug problems today.  Every day, more than 115 Americans die after overdosing on opioids.  Older adults are not immune to the opioid crisis we currently face. This session will share the extent of the opioid epidemic nationally, as well as sharing current trends and data specific to Wisconsin.  We will also discuss how the opioid crisis intersects with older adults and the ageing population, signs and symptoms of opioid misuse and abuse and what Wisconsin is currently doing to address the opioid epidemic in our state.
 
During this presentation you will learn:
 
1. The extent of the opioid epidemic nationally and in Wisconsin.
2. The signs, symptoms, and health risks of opioid misuse and abuse.
3. The best practices and approaches to treatment and pain management.
 
C2
How to Get What You Need From a Mental Health Consultation
Dr. David Mays, PhD

This session is for all providers

Care providers are often frustrated when they try to communicate with MD’s about mental health issues. This session is designed to help you learn to communicate with the doctor about what is going on with your client and what it is that you need. Participants are invited to bring up specific situations for discussion.

During this presentation you will learn:
 
1. How MD’s think about “cases” that are brought to them for consultation, i.e. how they organize what they hear.
2. What “homework” you can do to make the consultation go smoothly and efficiently.
3. How to get an MD’s attention when you don’t believe they are listening to your concerns.
C3 Repeat - Adapting the Zero Suicide Framework to Long-Term Care Settings:  Debunking the Myths and Understanding the Facts Shel Gross, MPA
Kenneth Wagman, RN
 
This session is a repeat, see B3 for the summary of the presentation.
C4
Repeat - Trauma-Informed Care in Mental Illness
Scott Webb, MSE, LCSW
 
This session is a repeat, see A2 for the summary of the presentation.
 
C5 Repeat - Verbal and Non Verbal De-escalation of Agitated or Violent Persons Elizabeth Masanz, RN, DON
 This session is full and no longer available for registration
This session is a repeat, see A6 for the summary of the presentation.
C6
Medication Use in Assisted Living Facilities for Mental Health Issues
Holly Altenberger, PharmD, RPh
This session is for assisted living providers
 
The first half of this session will focus on disease states and which medications are used (approved and off-label) for each of those. A general overview of mental health medications will be given. This will include side effects and interactions to be aware of as well as what hurdles we see with those medications. The second half will focus on how to stay compliant with mental health medications. This will include proper documentation in patient’s charts and Medication Administration Record (MAR) as well as monthly, quarterly and annual reports needed. This will be broken down and discussed in detail by facility type.
 
During this presentation you will learn:
 
1. Disease states that mental health medications are used to treat.
2. About mental health medications including but not limited to names, classes, mechanism of actions, side effects and interactions.
3. Assisted Living Facility regulations related to mental health medications and will gain full comprehension as to how to stay compliant with those regulations.
C7
Repeat - Caregiver High-Wire Act: Balancing Self-Preservation and Care
Brenda Avadian, BA, MA
 
This session is a repeat, see A3 for the summary of the presentation.
C8
Substance Use Problems (SUDS) in Aging
Dr. Susanne Waters Castillo, MSSW, PhD
This session is for all providers
In 2016, the Wisconsin Department of Health Service reported that 85% of the deaths due to alcohol related falls were in persons 65+.  This session looks at the impact of alcohol misuse and devastating effects on older adults.  Guidelines and an evidence-based approach to identifying risk will be explored.
 
During this presentation you will learn:
 
1. To articulate the impact of alcohol consumption on the aging process and become familiar with the guidelines for alcohol consumption for persons 65+.
2. How geriatric depression is related to substance abuse.
3. The evidence based practice of Screening, Brief Intervention and Referral to Treatment (SBIRT).
 
C9
Whose Crisis Is It?
Doreen Goetsch, CSW
Dinah LaCraze, MBA, APSW
Brandt Vaughn, BA
This session is for all providers
Guidelines for preventing and responding to a dementia or behavioral health crisis with someone in your care. Participants will learn who can assist in a crisis and when it’s appropriate for Adult Protective Services, County Crisis programs, or behavioral health to intervene. Tips for working with Law Enforcement and police safety plans.
 
During this presentation you will learn:
 
1. To identify who owns the crisis.
2. What crisis specific resources are available.
 
Repeat - Mental Health Care at the End of Life: Focus on the Patient
Dr. Anthony Braus, MD
 
This session is a repeat, see B7 for the summary of the presentation.

 


Keynote: Thursday, November 15, 2018  8:30-9:45 a.m.

Innovating Real-Time In Disasters
Desiree Matel-Anderson, JD, Emergency Manager

Healthcare to the rescue. Desi Matel-Anderson offers an immersive deep dive into the world of the Field Innovation Team, who routinely find themselves on the frontier of disasters working closely with health practitioners to save lives, at times while risking their own. Whether the team is setting up a virtual medical unit with nurses in Texas, providing public health gaming with emergency room physicians and public health officers after a virus outbreak in Miami, or scaling artificial intelligence with technologists for mental health resources in the Beqaa Valley, the team is working to expedite preparedness, response and recovery with communities across the globe. The stories, lessons and disasters will be tied back to past and future regional hazards faced by health practitioners in Wisconsin from historic floods, tornadoes and winter storms.

During this presentation you will learn:
 
1. Learn from healthcare practitioners and innovators saving lives in disasters.
2. How to get prepared for emergencies from lessons in the field.
3. How the future of technology and design are shaping emergencies.

 

Thursday, November 15
Breakout Sessions: "D" Series 10:15-11:45 a.m.  

Choose one from this series:

D1Design in Disasters
Desiree Matel-Anderson, JD, Emergency Manager
This session is for all providers
Disaster strikes! Are you ready? Join Desiree (Desi) Matel-Anderson and the Field Innovation Team to walk you through a three-step process for designing healthcare solutions—beginning with a narrative of who and what you are solving for, then sculpting a focused challenge statement through a reframing exercise, and concluding by dialing into future solutions. Along the way, Desi covers emergency management and case studies from past emergencies that demonstrate the design process as a proven method to solve challenges in crisis. You’ll learn a design thinking process that enables on-your-feet problem solving and rapid response.
 
During this presentation you will learn:
 

1. Design thinking with the 3 Step Prep and how it applies to disasters in healthcare.
2. To identify activities necessary to enhance collaboration, coordination, and relationships with partners in preparedness and response.
3. Skills for leaders to handle the unpredictable.

D2
Root Cause Analysis: When and Where Did this Pressure Injury Start and Was it Avoidable?
Dr. Joyce Black, PhD, RN, FAAN

This session is full and no longer available for registration
This session is for all providers

Root cause analysis is a process in which you will examine the pressure injury and factors surrounding its development to determine whether or not it was avoidable. The wound itself is the first step and then the events occurring at the time the pressure injury started will be examined to determine what was happening and if anything could have been done to prevent the pressure injury.

During this presentation you will learn:
 
1. How to examine the aspects of the appearance and location of the pressure injury to guide a retrospective look at patient care.
2. What aspects occur outside of the wound, in the providers and environment that can lead to ulceration.
3. How to collect the findings from root cause analysis and examine the system providing care.
 
D3
Easing Transitions from Home
Sherry Neal, RN-BC, CDDN

This session is for all providers

Transitions can be difficult for anyone, but if a person is older and has a developmental disability it can be particularly troublesome.  Aging occurs 10-20 years earlier in persons with Intellectual and  Developmental Disabilities (I/DD).  This means they develop more chronic health conditions and possibly early dementia prompting a person to transition to a higher level of care much earlier than their neurotypical peers. Persons may live in an assisted living home and have friendships and a circle of support there. This session will give providers some tools for successful transitions. 

During this presentation you will learn:
1. To identify at least two types of transitions that an older adult may experience.
2. How to identify three interventions so that transitions can be successful.
3. To identify two strategies to follow if the transition is not successful.
 
D4
Graying of The Rainbow: Best Practices for Creating Safety and Inclusion for LGBT Residents
Britta Larson, MNA, LNHA

This session is for all providers

There are approximately 1.5 million lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) older adults in this country. Many LGBT older adults have experienced discrimination and stigma in their lifetime. LGBT older adults are less likely to seek services from aging service providers for fear of discrimination and face complex challenges and barriers in long-term care settings. This interactive session will provide practical guidance, including program and policy recommendations, on developing inclusive programs and services for LGBT older adults.

During this presentation you will learn:
 
1. Terminology associated with the LGBT community.
2. The unique challenges facing the aging LGBT community and special considerations for working with LGBT older adults.
3. To Identify ways in which their organization can best address the needs of LGBT older adults and have increased awareness of resources available to improve services provided to LGBT older adults.
  
D5
Life Safety and Emergency Preparedness Essentials for Administrators and Healthcare Professionals
Duane Van Beek
Deborah Ward, MS

This session is full and no longer available for registration
This session is for nursing home providers

Administrators are ultimately accountable for effective implementation of emergency preparation and life safety requirements within long-term care facilities. Healthcare staff play a key role in supporting these requirements. This session provides Administrators, Directors of Nursing, and other healthcare professionals with an overview of these requirements and tools for engaging their facility management staff and vendors as a confirmation that the regulations are well understood and being implemented within their facilities.

During this presentation you will learn:

1. The purpose of emergency preparedness training and establish an individualized learning plan.
2. The fundamental requirements of the Life Safety Code (LSC) and Emergency Preparedness Regulations.
3. Appropriate tools to support and evaluate performance on Life Safety and Emergency Preparedness Requirements.
 
D6
Infection Control- it’s in YOUR Hands
Dr. John Boyce, MD
This session is for all providers
This session will provide the rationale for, and evidence supporting, the 5 Moments for Hand Hygiene.  Give examples of when each of the 5 Moments is indicated during the course of patient care. Discuss the “patient zone” and “healthcare zone” and how these relate to the 5 Moments of Hand Hygiene.
 
During this presentation you will learn:
 
1. The 5 Moments for Hand Hygiene, as described by the World Health Organization (WHO).
2. How the concepts of the “patient zone” and “healthcare zone” relate to indications for hand hygiene.
3. The options for monitoring compliance of health personnel with the 5 Moments in different healthcare settings, including long-term care facilities.
  
D7
Navigating Boundaries, Resident Rights and Choice with Substitute Decision-Makers
Kim Marheine, MSE
Alice Page, JD, MPH
This session is full and no longer available for registration
This session is for all providers

This session will enable a discussion of the challenges and benefits of balancing rights, self-determination and risk when residents express choices that conflict with the expectations or preferences of substitute decision-makers.  The session will cover laws pertaining to guardianship and powers of attorney, and will include the most current information about the newly-passed "Supported Decision-Making" bill.
During this presentation you will learn:
 
1. The roles and boundaries of substitute decision-makers when conflicts arise over health care vs. quality of life decisions.
2. About Wisconsin’s Supported Decision-Making (SDM) Bill, including information about SDM authority and interface with other decision-making vehicles such as guardianship and Power of Attorney for Health Care.
3. The role of the Ombudsman in resolving resident concerns and complaints, providing education, and working with situations of conflict.
 
D8
Human Trafficking Awareness and Prevention
Tamara Remington, BA

This session is for all providers

Human Trafficking is going on and is documented in all 72 counties in Wisconsin.  This session covers what human trafficking is, who the victims, traffickers, and customers are. This session will also cover how traffickers recruite and obtain the victims. Human trafficking is modern-day slavery. Traffickers use force, fraud, coercion or drugs to lure victims for labor or commercial sexual exploitation. Traffickers prey on victims who are vulnerable.  Victims range from newborns to elderly. Health care facilities that serve the vulnerable, elderly, cognitively impaired and mentally ill need to assess the risk and know the warning signs to protect the residents and clients they serve from sex trafficking.

During this presentation you will learn: 

1. Who the victims of human trafficking are and how they get recruited.
2. Redflags and what to do if you observe signs of human trafficking.
3. Trends regarding human trafficking: What traffickers are looking for? Who are the traffickers, customers and victims?
 
D9
Demystifying Challenging Behaviors in Dementia: It’s All in Your Approach!
Dr. Beth Noland, PhD

This session is full and no longer available for registration
This session is for all providers

This session provides an in-depth review and skill building with a focus on not just what is lost in dementia, but rather, what is retained.  Participants will come to understand the value of the relationship with a person living with dementia (PLWD). Time will be spent practicing techniques essential to successful care partnering, therapy sessions or in the therapeutic relationship (including the Positive Physical Approach™ (PPA) and Hand-under-Hand® (HuH) technique to guide and assist to help reduce distress, encourage patient participation in their day and in therapy, and improve outcomes for both PLWD and providers. With the 6 Pieces of the Puzzle tool, participants will develop a plan to help de-code and demystify challenging care situations, leaving them with non-pharmacological intervention options to try.

During this presentation you will learn:
 
1. To describe and apply modifications associated with brain changes as dementia progresses (e.g., what is lost vs retained, role of vision, and sensory awareness and processing).
2. To demonstrate and practice the care partnering skills of a) Positive Physical Approach™ (PPA) technique to approach and connect and b) the Hand-under-Hand®technique to guide and assist PLWD.
3. The components of the tool, 6 Pieces of the Puzzle, as it applies to their persons living with dementia.
 
D10
Safety in the Workplace: Active Shooter Training
David Erwin, Certified Wisconsin Law Enforcement Officer

This session is for all providers

This session teaches participants how to individually respond to an incident and plan for their personal safety until law enforcement arrives.

During this presentation you will learn:

1. About safety measures (personal safety).
2. About situational awareness.
3. About survival mindset.
 
D11
What Living as a Resident Can Teach Long-Term Care Staff
Leslie Pedtke, BA, LNHA

This session is for all providers

What happens when caregivers become residents?  Will their experiences change their approach to caring for residents?
‘Through the Looking Glass’ is a program developed at Aviston Countryside Manor to teach empathy to our caregivers. It grew into an Elder Shadowing program that required all newly hired staff to live with a resident for 24 hours before they are able to begin their new job. From learning the importance of communicating more with residents to encouraging meaningful activities, the resulting insights led to practical and effective ways that they were able to immediately improve daily care to residents.

During this presentation you will learn: 

1. How to set up an empathy program that will fit their long-term care community.
2. How to identify areas for improvement for the focus of the empathy program.
3. To recognize the effects of ‘institutionalization’ on us psychologically and physically.

 

Thursday, November 15
Breakout Sessions: "E" Series 12:45-2:15 p.m.  

Choose one from this series:

E1
Bureau of Assisted Livings: Believe it or Not!
Cheryl Bott, MSSW
William Gardner
Cari Gast, BS, MBA
Mary Beth Hoffman, CSW

This session is full and no longer available for registration
This session is for assisted living providers

Attendees of this session will hear some of the strange occurrences that have happened at assisted living facilities around the state.  Unique complaints, unfortunate events, odd calls and strange scenarios that have occurred in our facilities will be shared.  Lightning strikes…Owner/licensee dies unexpectedly…Family demands cameras in resident rooms… Chickens living at the CBRF?
An interactive Panel Discussion lead by Bureau of Assisted Living (BAL) staff who will describe these scenarios and explain strategies and survival skills to help you prepare for the unique and unusual.

During this presentation you will learn:

1. Think beyond your basic emergency planning; identify potential catastrophic events.
2. Develop strategies to deal with unusual circumstances and emergencies in Assisted Living.
3. Gain a better understanding of the Bureaus expectation when emergencies arise.
 
E2
Repeat - Root Cause Analysis: When and Where Did this Pressure Injury Start and Was it Avoidable?
Dr. Joyce Black, PhD, RN, FAAN

This session is a repeat, see D2 for the summary of the presentation. 

E3
Fundamentals of Planning for Post-Disaster Recovery
James Schwab, BA, MA, FAICP

This session is for all providers

This session will discuss the essential elements of community planning for post-disaster recovery, what makes it a complex challenge, and why public involvement is essential to success. This session is based on work done by the American Planning Association, led by the presenter, with Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) support and will address why this is a multidisciplinary effort.

During this presentation you will learn:

1. Why effective planning and preparing for post-disaster recovery is critical resilience.
2. How various professions can contribute to a positive result in promoting post-disaster recovery at a community level.
3. Where they can fit into the larger picture of community success in post-disaster recovery.

E4
Repeat - Graying of The Rainbow: Best Practices for Creating Safety and Inclusion for LGBT Residents
Britta Larson, MNA, LNHA
 
This session is a repeat, see D4 for the summary of the presentation. 
 
E5
Repeat - Life Safety and Emergency Preparedness Essentials for Administrators and Healthcare Professionals
Duane Van Beek
Deborah Ward, MS


This session is a repeat, see D5 for the summary of the presentation. 

E6
Repeat - Infection Control- it’s in YOUR Hands
Dr. John Boyce, MD

This session is a repeat, see D6 for the summary of the presentation.
 
E7
Navigating Round-Abouts of Resident Choice
Christy Daley, BS
Jessica Radtke

This session is for all providers

This session will offer discussions and practical ideas that honor resident choice and promote person directed care when multiple intervening opinions exist.
 
During this presentation your will learn:
 
1. To promote positive outcomes through education and collaboration.
2. To support resident voice in the decision making process.
3. How rights and regulations can coexist.
 
E8
Chronic Pain and the Role of the Medical Director
Dr. David Momont

This session is for all providers

In the beginning of this session we will discuss the current state of opioid use and mistreatment in our country. Next we will talk about what exactly that means for long-term care. How does this effect the care we provide? Where do we go from here?

During this presentation you will learn:

1. The physiology of pain; mu receptor.
2. The balance of pain control from the IDT perspective.
3. Alternative treatments; non-opioid options.

E9
Repeat - Demystifying Challenging Behaviors in Dementia: It’s All in Your Approach!
Dr. Beth Noland, PhD

This session is full and no longer available for registration
This session is a repeat, see D9 for the summary of the presentation.

E10
Stop, Starting It! Staff Edition
Cagney Martin, CNA
Merry Wimmer, CNA
This session is for all providers
Over the last 10 years, Mount View Care Center’s dementia training program, "Stop, Starting It!", has transformed from a strictly dementia-focused training to changing an organization’s culture. This session will focus on the importance of a caregiver’s approach and reaction to those who live with dementia, as well as the approach and reaction of an organization to the recruitment and retention of CNA’s. Starting new employees off on the right foot and finding the “right” employees are the first steps to providing amazing dementia care.
 
During this presentation you will learn: 
 
1. How to apply the "Stop, Starting It!" model of care to address the CNA shortage in nursing facilities.
2. How to set up a program that provides CNAs the tools for success.
3. The hard fact that your organizational culture may be the biggest obstacle to effective recruitment and retention.
 
E11
What Living as a Resident Can Teach Long-Term Care Staff
Leslie Pedtke, BA, LNHA

This session is a repeat, see D11 for the summary of the presentation.

 
Thursday, November 15
Breakout Sessions: "F" Series 2:30-4:00 p.m.  

Choose one from this series:

F1
Transitions of Care: Blue Envelope Process
Maria Brenny-Fitzpatrick, DNP, FNP-C, GNP-BC
Alfred Johnson
Jerry Riederer, RN

This session is for assisted living providers

Seamless transitions between care settings are critical for the wellbeing of our clients. Changing care needs must be communicated between facilities to ensure consistently appropriate care.
In this session, attendees will be introduced to the benefits of a system to provide coordinated transitions between facilities. We will review regulatory ramifications of poor transition coordination, and provide an overview of the “Blue Envelope” system for providing quality transitions.

During this presentation you will learn:

1. Why seamless transitions of care lead to improved client outcome.
2. Examples of negative outcome related to poor transitions of care.
3. How the “Blue Envelope” system can assist in consistently providing quality transition in care and improved client outcomes.
 
F2
Repeat - Stop, Starting It! Staff Edition
Cagney Martin, CNA
Merry Wimmer, CNA
This session is full and no longer available for registration
This session is a repeat, see E10 for the summary of the presentation.
F3
Repeat - Navigating Round-Abouts of Resident Choice
Christy Daley, BS
Jessica Radtke

This session is a repeat, see E7 for the summary of the presentation.
F4
Repeat - Navigating Boundaries, Resident Rights and Choice with Substitute Decision-Makers
Kim Marheine, MSE
Alice Page, JD, MPH
 This session is full and no longer available for registration
This session is a repeat, see D7 for the summary of the presentation.
 
F5
Update on Legionnaires’ Disease in Wisconsin
Anna Kocharian, MS

This session is for all providers.

This session will provide an update on the surveillance and epidemiology of legionellosis in Wisconsin and will highlight Legionella public health investigations and response in long-term care settings (assisted living and nursing homes).

During this presentation you will learn:
 
1. How Legionella is transmitted and can become a public health concern.
2. About the burden and risk factors for Legionnaires’ disease.
3. Examples of Legionella public health investigations and response at long-term care settings (assisted living and nursing homes) in Wisconsin.
 
F6
Building the Statewide Health Information Network
Joe Kecheiski

This session is for all providers

Long-Term and Post-Acute Care Providers (LTPACs) often spend countless hours manually tracking down needed records and results from multiple providers.  WISHIN can help! With access to WISHIN Pulse, a community health record with an aggregated, longitudinal summary of patient information from multiple organizations, LTPACs can be confident in knowing they have the clinical information they need to better understand the whole health of their patients, make more informed treatment decisions, avoid costly patient readmissions, and better coordinate patient care. This session will discuss the state of Health Information Exchange (HIE) and interoperability in Wisconsin, highlight who WISHIN is (the State designated entity authorized under WI Act 274 to govern statewide health information exchange with oversight from DHS) and how it benefits post-acute/long-term care. Facilities do not need to utilize Electronic Health Records (EHRs) to benefit from WISHIN) and how it benefits post-acute/long-term care.

During this presentation you will learn:

1. The state of Health Information Exchange and interoperability in Wisconsin and  who WISHIN is.
2. How WISHIN Pulse reduces time spent on phone calls and faxes trying to obtain patient information- connecting to WISHIN provides you with allergies, diagnoses, diagnostic reports, discharge summaries, and more from participating providers.
3. How WISHIN provides a more complete picture of the individual’s health over time, leading to more informed treatment decisions while reducing avoidable, costly patient readmissions.
4. How enabling seamless data-sharing capabilities makes it easier for LTPACs to participate in preferred provider networks and provides crucial tools in emergency situations when the local EHR may be temporarily unavailable due to a technical failure or a natural disaster.

 
F7
Fatal Five Plus 1
Sherry Neal, RN-BC, CDDN

This session is for all providers

The “Fatal Five” are five potentially life threatening conditions that may be seen in the aging population of persons with Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities (I/DD). In this session, caregivers who have direct contact with persons with I/DD, will learn how to recognize the early signs and symptoms of these conditions.  Prompt detection, identification and immediate action is key to preventing deaths in this unique community.

During this presentation you will learn:

1. How to identify the “Fatal Five” .
2. To identify at least 3 symptoms of any of the “Fatal Five”.
3. To identify prevention measures for the any of the “Fatal Five”.

F8
Repeat - Fundamentals of Planning for Post-Disaster Recovery
James Schwab, BA, MA, FAICP

This session is a repeat, see E3 for the summary of the presentation.
F9 Repeat - Chronic Pain and the Role of the Medical Director Dr. David Momont

This session is a repeat, see E8 for the summary of the presentation.
 
F10
Vaccines are Not Just for Kids
Dr. Stephanie Borchardt, PhD, MPH

This session is for all providers

Contrary to popular belief, there are many vaccines indicated for adults that have been shown to reduce morbidity and mortality. The Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices is comprised of medical and public health experts who develop the vaccine schedules and corresponding recommendations for the use of vaccines in the general population. The adult immunization schedule outlines both age and risk based vaccine recommendations and is updated at least annually.

During this presentation you will learn:

1. The disease burden for several vaccine-preventable diseases.
2. The adult vaccine schedule and corresponding recommendations.
3. How to apply the adult vaccine schedule and recommendations using the case study approach.

F11
Missing in Action: Drug Diversion in Long-Term Care Settings
Doug Englebert, R.Ph., MBA
David Mack
Laruie Arkens

This session is full and no longer available for registration
This session is for all providers

The direct diversion of prescription medications has become all too common in health care settings.  It is essential for facilities to gear up and prepare themselves to combat this problem head on. The best approaches are proactive and focus on secure systems, thorough procedures and protocols and in-depth staff training on recognition, investigation and reporting when diversion occurs. This breakout session will be a panel discussion led by Captain David Mack of the Winnebago County Sherriff’s Office, Doug Englebert, Pharmacist Consultant, Department of Health Services Division of Quality Assurance and Laurie Arkens, Director of the Office of Caregiver Quality, Division of Quality Assurance. "Missing In Action" will provide insight on the latest diversion tactics and trends from a law enforcement perspective as well as tips to ensure your investigation is thorough and accurate.  Medication systems will be discussed to help you find the best approach to monitor and prevent diversion of medications. A review of the reporting requirements under Chapter 13 will ensure you understand how to navigate the reporting process.

During this presentation you will learn:

1. What’s new in the world of prescription drug diversion from a law enforcement perspective.
2. The latest in medication monitoring systems as well as trends in medication misappropriation from our statewide pharmacist.
3. How to navigate the DHS Chapter 13 reporting requirements to ensure you are in compliance and to keep caregivers who steal out of the industry.

 

 Sponsored by: 
The Department of Health Services, Division of Quality Assurance​