LGBTQ

LGBTQ

Student Health Service offers medical care for LGBTQ students in a non-judgmental and caring fashion. All of our medical providers have been through Safe Zone training through the Gender & Sexuality Alliance and are allies.

For more information about the UWSP Gender & Sexuality Alliance go to http://stuorgs.uwsp.edu/gsa/pages/home.aspx

If you would like to become an ally or learn more about the Faculty and Staff Gay-Straight Alliance (FSGSA) go to http://www.uwsp.edu/dca/fsgsa/Pages/default.aspx

Coming Out to Your Medical Provider

Being open with your healthcare provider is important to receive the proper information you need. Although telling your healthcare provider about your sexual orientation and gender identity can be difficult, uncomfortable, or frightening, your provider may need to know in order to provide the best care possible. Even your conversations can become more comfortable when they refer to your sexual partner(s) or use your preferred gender pronouns.
 
For tips on how to come out to your healthcare provider click here 

Safer Sex

Safer sex is important for everyone. We all want to protect ourselves from unintended pregnancy, HIV, and STIs (sexually transmitted infections).
 
Remember:
  • Choosing not to have sex provides 100 percent protection from HIV, STIs, and pregnancy.
  • Using alcohol or drugs can impair your judgment and make you less able to make good decisions about sex.
  • Use a condom every time you have oral, anal, or vaginal sex.
  • There are ways to express sexual feelings without having sex – masturbation, massage, and kissing are all low or no-risk activities.
Sharing needles can also transmit HIV, so don’t do it!

Learn how to properly use a condom with this video from Trojan Condoms. While this video shows a heterosexual couple using a condom, the lesson is universal to people of all sexual orientations!

Men Who Have Sex with Men

You can protect yourself from HIV and other STIs by using condoms and getting tested regularly.
  • Always use condoms for oral and anal sex. Remember to use a new condom every time!
  • HIV is transmitted through blood and sexual fluids. Be careful about coming into contact with either, or with open sores.
  • Some kinds of STIs are spread through skin to skin contact. Condoms can provide some protection against these.


Women Who Have Sex with Women

You may have heard that women who have sex with women don't have to worry about STIs. But any contact with blood or body fluids can be a risk factor for getting a sexually transmitted infection including HIV. Clearly, protection is still important for lesbians, bisexual women, and other women who have sex with women. So, follow these tips for safer sex:
  • For manual sex (using your hands for penetration), use a latex barrier like surgical gloves, especially if you have a cut or rash on your hands.
  • A dental dam (a latex square which is placed over the women's genital area) can provide protection during oral sex with a woman. If you don't have a dental dam, a condom can be unrolled and cut open to create a barrier.
  • HIV is transmitted through blood and sexual fluids. Be careful about coming into contact with either, or with open sores. 
  • Some kinds of STIs are spread through skin to skin contact. Condoms can provide some protection against these.
  • If you have anal, oral, or vaginal sex with someone who has a penis, remember to use condoms. 


Bi and Safe

If you identify as bisexual, it is important for you to remember all the ways you can protect yourself from HIV, STIs, and pregnancy.
  • Intercourse (when the penis enters the vagina) can result in pregnancy. Use condoms, contraception, or both to prevent pregnancy. Intercourse can also transmit HIV between partners, so use condoms and get tested regularly.
  • Use a condom or a dental dam (a latex square placed over the woman’s genital area) whenever you have vaginal, oral, or anal sex.
  • HIV is transmitted through blood and sexual fluids. Be careful about coming into contact with either, or with open sores.
  • Some kinds of STIs are spread through skin to skin contact. Condoms can provide some protection against these.
  • Remember to use a new condom at every act of sex.


Trans and Safe

If you are transgender, safer sex might be confusing. If you have recently transitioned or are transitioning, you might not be aware of the risks or might not yet feel comfortable a talking about protection from a new point of view. But remember that whether or not you are ready to talk about it, HIV and STIs are still a very serious risk. Make safer sex your first priority!
  • Use a condom or a dental dam (a latex square placed over the genital area) whenever you have vaginal, oral, or anal sex.
  • HIV is transmitted through blood and sexual fluids. Be careful about coming into contact with either, or with open sores.
  • Some kinds of STIs are spread through skin to skin contact. Condoms can provide some protection against these.
  • Remember to use a new condom at every act of sex.


Have more questions?

Try the GLBT National Help Center

Graduating and need to find a medical provider?

Go to the Gay & Lesbian Medical Association site