This Month In Fashion: To Denim or Not to Denim?
Emmitt Williams
esill756@uwsp.edu
denim-2-color-emmitt-williams.jpgWe live in a world where fashion is a gateway to expression. Trends change and, in some aspects, are completely recycled. Whatever the case may be, it’s all fashion, and fashion is what this column is all about.


Back in September, I introduced the column with some of my personal experiences and how I had gained interest in fashion. This month I asked my fellow peers, “To denim or not to denim?” After inquiring, I learned how big of a trend it has become even on our campus.

Khaikai Dorsch, a freshmen majoring in business administration: international business, is one of many students on campus that has an eye for color and matching fabrics. She wears denim to emphasize her presence.

“I’d rather wear denim. I love the color of it. It’s a dominant look for a woman,” Dorsch said.

She also talks about the longevity of denim and why it is still in style.

“The colors never get old, and it is really easy to match with everything,” Dorsch said.

However, she does not limit herself to denim. She mentioned denim is just a piece of her style.

​ABOVE: Photo by Emmitt Williams.
 
BELOW: Photo by Phillip Hass. Colored denim adds a playful edge to
everyday pieces.
 
denim-2-color-phillip-hass.jpgEager to hear more about people’s opinion on denim, I bumped into Rika Calvin, a sophomore political science pre-law major, and Yomary Sylvia, a biochemistry major. I found two new perspectives and discovered that some people wear denim for more relaxing purposes.

“I like to wear denim to just be comfortable,” Calvin said.

On the other hand, it is also socially accepted as casual attire.

“But when I do dress up, I do wear denim in a different sense—to look cute, step out with the girls, and have a little fun,” Calvin said.

Others like Yomary wear denim purely as a fashion statement.

“I wear it more for a fashion statement. Normally, I’m going for that vintage look, like wearing it with something bright or a cheetah print,” Yomary said.

I found that some people who don’t wear denim as much still think highly of it, like Nkaohly Xiong, a senior pre-occupational therapy major.

“I don’t really wear jeans. Sometimes I do, and sometimes I don’t. In the U.S I think denim will always be in, but I think this year jean jackets are very in,” Xiong said.

Even though Xiong wears more shorts and leggings, she still said “to denim.”

It began to dawn on me that not only has denim been around for a while, but also it seems to be a common fashion expression among most students on campus. This was definitely confirmed after speaking to Morgan McMahon, a dance and arts management major.

“When I choose to wear denim, it is definitely conscious. I try to express myself with red colored denim on top and bottom,” McMahon said.

My peers have answered the question, “To denim or not to denim?”

To denim.