SGA Invites Legislators to Campus
Emily Margeson
emarg634@uwsp.edu

The Student Government Association has recently been working to invite state legislators to campus. This summer, the state legislature was trying to pass an act to end segregated fees for student organizations that could have potentially taken away $400,000 but was vetoed by the governor.

“Since this act was vetoed, SGA is trying to build relationships with members of the legislature,” said Rachel Siebers, legislative issues director of SGA. These meetings with legislatures can help show them what we are doing here in Stevens Point and our campus efforts, added Siebers.

After inviting 65 legislators to campus one of them will be visiting campus this month. Katrina Shankland, the representative for the 71st assembly district (Stevens Point) will be here on Sept. 27.

“Depending on their interests, we plan on having the legislators meet with the student leadership organizations, staff and faculty, higher administration, possibly the chancellor if available,” stated Siebers, “and showing them around on a campus tour and our efforts for sustainability.” This is a starting point to help show legislators what everyone on campus is doing and how effective University of Wisconsin- Stevens Point is.

Among Shankland, the rest of the 64 legislators have received an open invitation.

“This invite lets them know that they are welcome to UWSP anytime and if they are in the area to keep the visit in mind,” said David Boardman, vice president of the association.

The main goal that the association is trying to show is that if you are active and voice your opinion, you can make a difference. “This act is one of only 57 vetoes issued by the governor,” Boardman said. That shows how hard SGA and other organizations worked to keep the $400,000.

Another exciting event the association has scheduled is to meet with 12 people of legislation in Madison to help improve relationships as well.

“SGA takes their job seriously and wants students to know that their opinions matter and they can make a difference,” Boardman said.​