It’s Getting Hot in Here
Kyle Florence
kflor654@uwsp.edu
After a brutal Wisconsin winter, students at the University of Wisconsin-Stevens Point are eager to get outside and enjoy the welcome onslaught of warm weather—and an increase in rambunctious behavior.

“Students have more energy, they’re more boisterous, and they’re more likely to turn their music up to ungodly volumes, turn the speakers around outside and lock their doors so we can’t get to them,” Amy Vida, the fourth floor Community Advisor for Hansen Hall, said.

Spencer Schreiner, a CA in Baldwin Hall, agrees with Vida, citing noise as a typical issue that becomes more prevalent with warmer weather.

“For me, personally, I feel like the biggest issue that comes with rowdiness is loudness, and that’s especially apparent after quiet hours or during courtesy hours,” Schreiner said. “Just trying to enforce that when people are going out and trying to have a good time can be a little rough.”

Joe Krumrie, another CA from Baldwin Hall, stated that, the consumption of alcohol on campus property is also a constant concern, especially as temperatures rise.

“Alcohol violations are one of the biggest things we have to deal with. We don’t do any disciplinary action. We just confront the situation when it comes up to us,” Krumrie said.

Vida also noted an increase in alcohol consumption.

“Broken shot glasses in stairwells are something we’ve been seeing a lot of lately. Also, a lot of people are running around outside, and then they’ll drink, so there’s a lot of vomit,” Vida said.

Warmer months prompt more student outdoor activities, which can be both a positive and a negative to those trying to enforce university policy.

“There’s definitely a lot more drinking going on as it gets warmer out, but the great thing is people go out more, so the game kind of changes,” CA Dominic Pritzl said. “It goes from us having to deal with things at midnight or 2 a.m., to 3 or 4 a.m. when people are coming back into the halls, which can suck because that’s when I’m trying to sleep.”

Krumrie is also familiar with this two-sided problem.

“It’s kind of a plus for us, because with the warmer weather people tend to want to go out more—as in go outside of the halls and drink—so it’s a little easier for us in that aspect. However, at the same time, when people do stay in, the warm weather tends to make them a little more hyper and a little more rowdy, so it’s sort of a double-edged sword,” Krumrie said.

According to Vida, with the arrival of summer, it becomes necessary for students to maintain some level of responsibility while enjoying the weather.
“Have fun, but just be careful,” Vida said. “We have a lot more injuries when it’s warm out because a lot of people go out and do reckless things. Don’t be one of those people.”