Falling Out of Love With Your Major?
Emmitt james
ewill756@uwsp.edu - Twitter @Emmitt_james
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What happens when you fall out of love with your major? Was it just an academic fling? Should you go see your advisor? Falling out of love with your major is common among many college students.

Keith Wixson, a social science major, has switched his major about five times. After switching so often, he found himself at a point where he was unsure about he wanted to do.

“I felt like I went in to college a little too early. Before I knew it, I did not know what I wanted to do because it was expected of me to go to college. Not going to college just means like, ‘What’s wrong with you?’ ” Wixson said.

Originally, Wixson wanted to be an international business major. This turned into international studies— until he founded out he was not the best at foreign languages, which led him to focus on history and political science. Before Wixson settled down with a social science path, he also aspired to teach. Then that passion died down as well.

Wixson, like many other college students, came to the realization that he wanted to do a lot of things. This is a part of the college experience: finding a passion.

“If you have a passion, you have an interest. A lot of kids are in certain classes because they feel it’s going to get them a good job or something they want, but they’re not there because they really enjoy it,” Wixson said.

But what happens when knowing what you love to do is still not enough?

Mai Xee Thao, a senior business major with a double concentration in marketing and international business, started as undeclared even though she knew what she loved to do.

“I know what I love to do, but I couldn’t pinpoint what I love to do with a major in Point,” Thao said.

However, Thao’s journey started with an interest in sociology.

“I thought I wanted to do sociology because I was leaning toward social work, since I wanted work with families. But after working at the Boy & Girls Club, I realized that’s not what I wanted to do,” Thao said.

Thao mentioned she did not think she would have the patience to stay with that kind of job and would eventually lose the passion for it.

After social work, she tried arts management but only because that was the closest thing to what she thought she wanted to do. During the introductory course,she realized her passion lay elsewhere.

Thao’s arts management pursuits transitioned to an interest in public relations and then to where she is now, a business major.

Thao mentioned she loves her business major because of the numerous opportunities that lie within it.

“I think it’s what I want to do for the rest of my life because the field is so broad. If I wanted to, I could go into consulting, retailing or merchandising,” Thao said.

Switching your major underlines the true essence of being a college student—finding a major that fits you best. Even though you might fall out of love with one, it is simply a part of the exploration.