90FM Album Review: The Daredevil Christopher Wright - The Nature of Things
Kyle Florence
Kyle.A.Florence@uwsp.edu





Formed in Eau Claire in late 2004, The Daredevil Christopher Wright is an indie-folk trio made up of brothers Jon (vocals, guitar) and Jason (vocals, bass) Sunde, and fellow Wisconsin-native Jesse Edington (vocals, percussion). The band hit the ground running, tirelessly crafting their own unique style of alternative music after only being existence a matter of months; this steadfast dedication would yield two critically acclaimed EP’s by November of 2008, both of which were self-released. The band’s first debut full-length, ‘In Deference to a Broken Back’, which contained a majority of songs mixed by Bon Iver front man Justin Vernon, would send waves across the indie music scene in May of 2009 on Amble Down Records. Since then, the band has garnered an impressive level of success throughout the Midwest, participating in the indie festival Pygmalion, recording a Daytrotter session, and opening for Vernon frequently.

Likewise, the group’s sophomore album ‘The Nature of Things’, was met with a barrage of acclaim upon its release this previous June.

“With ‘The Nature of Things’, we made an intentional effort to focus and tighten the writing. To try to confine the arrangements to elements that the three of us could perform,” said Jon Sunde.

This effort is apparent throughout the album. The band remains true to their own brand of hippie-era influenced folk, so much so that the airtight harmonies and nimble acoustics of ‘The Nature of Things’ could very easily be mistaken for some long-forgotten Simon and Garfunkel recording. The group’s song-writing itself also seems to have developed, often painting an overtly contemplative picture. “Ames” tells the sad tale of a meth addict pleading for freedom from an unfulfilling life, only to be outdone by “Church”, an unusually cheery-sounding tune which propels listeners squarely into the center of a collapsing marriage.

Ultimately however, ‘The Nature of Things’ seems to be just what The Daredevil Christopher Wright intended it to be—carefully constructed, eloquently basic, and accessible to almost any listener.