FOCUS Breakout Sessions 

 Keynote: Tuesday, November 19, 2013

 
"Reducing Antipsychotic Drug Use Through Person-Centered Dementia Care"

Cheryl Phillips​​​
During this presentation we will review current national nursing home data on the use of antipsychotics and some of the drivers of that use. We will explore evidence-based models that focus on behavioral, non-pharmacologic approaches to care for people with dementia and review specific approaches providers can take in their own communities to reduce unnecessary use of these drugs.

Participants will learn:
1. At least three factors that drive current use of antipsychotics.
2. How to describe specific successful models of practice that are non-pharmacologically based.
3. Specific steps and checklists that providers can use in both nursing homes and assisted living settings to safely reduce the use of antipsychotics.
 
 



Tuesday, November 19
Breakout Sessions: "A" Series 10-11:30 a.m.  

Choose one of the following:

A1​
Let M​​e Be Me! Let'​s Do it Drug Free:  Using Culture Change and
R​​esident-Centered Care Approaches to Reduce Medications​
THIS WORKSHOP IS FULL
Janice Baron Dombrowski
Cagney Martin
Merry Wimmer​​​
Are you frustrated with your resident’s “behaviors”? Wonder why they wander, yell, and hit? Well, STOP, STARTING IT! More often than not we place the blame on them and their disease, when much of what they are doing can be attributed to OUR APPROACH and OUR behavior. The culture our team has created looks at the root cause of dementia-related “behaviors” or symptoms, our role in those “behaviors,” and the use of alternative approaches rather than medications. Our approach fosters positive and meaningful communication between all disciplines, the physician, and families. We will share our successes as well as the many bumps in the road we've experienced. Join us for an interactive, perception changing educational workshop on how we have changed our culture and OUR behavior and why you should too!

Participants will learn:
1.    To explore the clinical problem of unnecessary medications with a non-clinical approach.
2.    About the business philosophy to finding the right people to care for your residents.
3.    How to develop a tool that works for your facility. 

 
A2
Understanding Behaviors of the Different Dementias​
THIS WORKSHOP IS FULL
Kim Peterson​​​
This session will address general principles of behavioral and psychological symptoms of dementia and how these behaviors are expressed in the different dementias, such as Alzheimer's Disease, Lewy Body Dementia, Vascular Cognitive Impairment and the Frontal-temporal dementias. The presenter will also introduce a tool, the Neuropsychiatric Inventory (NPI), to help health care providers assess the different behaviors and develop a non-drug and drug care plan for dealing with them.
 

Participants will learn:
1. The different behavioral symptoms of dementia.
2. Key behaviors of various dementias.
3. How to use the NPI tool to assess dementia behaviors.

 
A3
Meaningful Engagement, Positive Outcomes​
Mary Ellen O'Connell
Patty Morter​​​
During this session, the presenters will be discussing the importance of meaningful engagement in attaining positive behavioral outcomes. They will provide examples of individualized approaches that can be implemented and provide you with information about available life enrichment resources you can use to meet client needs.

Participants will learn:
1. What meaningful engagement is and its impact on behaviors.
2. How to tailor individualized approaches to promote comfort and function.
3. The importance of taking an interdisciplinary approach in meeting client needs.  

 
A4​
A Consistent Assignment How-to: Overcoming Operational Challenges​
Cathie Brady
Barbara Frank​​​
This session provides practical tips for how to increase the level of implementation of consistent assignment. It addresses operational challenges such as how to maintain consistency when there are last minute absences or employee turnover, how to make and keep balanced assignments that are fair for staff and work for residents, how to trouble-shoot when staff have challenges, and how to maximize consistent assignments by involving dedicated CNAs in care planning. 

Participants will learn:
1. Practical strategies for strengthening and maintaining consistency of assignments.
2. Practices to overcome operational challenges in implementing consistent assignments.
3. Ways to maximize consistent assignment by engaging dedicated CNAs in care planning.  

 
A5​
Antipsychotics in Long Term Care:  Are They a Need or a Want and What's the Alternative?​  THIS WORKSHOP IS FULL
Robert Breslow​​​
The session will include information about the risks associated with antipsychotics, how to avoid using antipsychotics, the decision process for selecting and initiating antipsychotics, how to monitor antipsychotics, how to assess their use, and how to stop them. If other options are ineffective, a key to optimal use of antipsychotics is the engagement of the interdisciplinary team to assure patient centered care. Audience participation will be incorporated into the session to illustrate key content. 

Participants will learn:
1. The process and considerations for initiating/selecting an antipsychotic, if all else fails.
2. Appropriate and inappropriate indications for use of antipsychotics.
3. Significant drug-related adverse effects/risks of antipsychotics and cautions for use. 

 
A6​
Delirium: How Do I Recognize It? What Do I Do Next? A Case-Based Approach​
Josh Chodosh​​​
This session will highlight signs and symptoms od delirium of various types and focus on red flags, challenges of distinguishing delirium from other mental health conditions, including dementia, assessment apporaches, and non-pharmacological treatment modalities.
 
Participants will learn:
1. Key signs and symptoms of delirium.
2. How to distinguish delirium from other common and often co-occurring healthcare conditions.
3. Common non-pharmacological approaches to care. 
 
 
A7
Geriatric Sleep in Long Term Care-Can We Get Better ZZZs?​
Timothy Juergens​​​
Sleep is important to overall health but residents of long term care settings often have difficulty sleeping. This session will address the many contributing factors affecting sleep, some of which are easier to adjust than others. Factors to be reviewed include influences on the normal sleep components of circadian rhythm and homeostatic drive to sleep, as well as sleep disorders, medical and psychiatric disorders, medications and substances, and environmental factors.
 
 

Participants will learn:
1. Sleep changes that occur with aging and cognitive decline.
2. Disruptive factors that prevent sound sleep.
3. Non-medication interventions to improve sleep in a long term care setting.  

  
A8
Regulating Pain​
Ashok Choithani
Attendees will learn to differentiate between pain and behavior in persons with dementia. The focus will be on whether or not the health care provider is taking the path of least resistance by labeling residents as behavioral problems when instead the behaviors are due to pain. In addition the participants will learn to evaluate for the evidence based management of pain. 
 

Participants will learn:
1. How to define pain.
2. How to assess pain in different adult populations.
3. Treatment of pain with pharmacological as well as non-pharmacological modalities.  

  
A9
The CMS Hand in Hand Toolkit: What Leaders Need to Know to Support Person-Centered Care​
Karen Schoeneman​​​
This breakout session covers key aspects of the Hand in Hand training toolkit that CMS mailed to all nursing homes in 2012. The toolkit deals with techniques and skills staff can use to optimize their person-centered interactions with residents, especially those residents with dementia. For staff to be able to use these skills, leaders need to support and model these skills. Selected video segments of the course will be shown to illustrate good and bad styles of interacting, and how leaders can help staff to maximize dignity while providing care. 

Participants will learn:
1. A set of person-centered interaction tools their staff can use to maximize dignity for individuals with dementia.
2. How to empower staff to provide individualized and person-centered care.
3. How staff can anticipate and alleviate behaviors in residents with dementia.

 
A10
Forms of Dementia: What We Have Learned from Research​
Whitney Wharton​​​
The presenter will discuss different forms of dementia, with a focus on the most common cause of dementia - Alzheimer's disease. The session will cover how dementia is a complex issue with many causes and how researchers are using new technology to parse apart causes of dementia and Alzheimer's disease.

Attendees will learn:
1. What is dementia and how is it different than Alzheimer’s Disease?
2. What are common roadblocks to diagnosis and treatment in the primary care setting?
3. What is the etiology of Alzheimer's disease? 

 


Tuesday, November 19
Breakout Sessions: "B" Series 12:30-2 p.m.  

Choose one of the following:

B1
Let Me Be Me! Let's Do it Drug Free: Using Culture Change and Resident-Centered Care Approach to Reduce Medications
THIS WORKSHOP IS FULL
Janice Baron Dombrowski
Cagney Martin
Merry Wimmer​​​
This session is a repeat, see A1 for the summary of the presentation.

B2
Discovering the Environmental Differences in Person-Centered Care
Paula Gibson
Eve Montgomery
Go on the journey with Azura Memory Care in discovering the many ways a resident's environment makes a difference in their quality of life and moments of joy. Learn easy, inexpensive ways to enhance care, while creating smiles and infusing person-centered care within the home.

Participants will learn:
1. Specific environmental considerations when caring for people with dementia.
2. Purposeful ways to infuse culture change within your organization.
3. How to use personal history to engage residents in care.

B3
Delirium: How Do I Recognize It? What Do I Do Next? A Case-Based Approach
Josh Chodosh
This session is a repeat, see A6 for the summary of the presentation.

B4
Organizational Practices for Engaging Staff in Reducing Antipsychotic Medications
THIS WORKSHOP IS FULL
Cathie Brady
Barbara Frank ​​​
Engaging staff closest to the resident in individualizing care is key to alleviating and preventing distress. Through huddles at shift change and for just-in-time QI, staff have communication systems to problem-solve together to promote residents' highest practicable well-being. Learn how to take the management review of the 24 hour report from behind closed doors to the staff closest to the resident to identify triggers of residents' distress and implement effective interventions.

Participants will learn:
1. How to engage staff closest to the resident in identifying and implementing effective responses to residents' behavioral expressions of distress.
2. How to have everyday QI through systems for just-in-time information sharing and problem solving among staff.
3. How to implement huddles effectively.

B5
Antipsychotics in Long Term Care: Are They a Need or a Want and What's the Alternative?
THIS WORKSHOP IS FULL
Robert Breslow
This session is a repeat, see A5 for the summary of the presentation.

B6
They Still Have Rights: The Art of Promoting Resident Rights In An Era of Non-Pharmacologic Dementia Care
Matt Rohloff
Joan Schmitz
Phyllis “Flip” Varsos ​​​
This presentation will prepare attendees to better support and enhance resident rights in an age of managing Behavioral and Psychological Symptoms of Dementia (BPSD) without drugs. We will use case studies to look at the impact of using life-story questionnaires, behavioral tracking, root cause analysis and Individual Service Plan (ISP) tenets to develop successful care plans that meet individualized needs. It will include a review and discussion of conflict resolution and useful interventions for working with families, staff, and other health care providers to ensure appropriate, resident centered non-pharmacologic management of BPSD.

Participants will learn:
1. Why we need to rely less on pharmacologic management of BPSD and how the new paradigm shift better supports, encourages and promotes resident rights.
2. Use of tools to identify residents as more than persons with dementia and how to meet their individualized needs within their new realities.
3. How to defuse the saboteurs and get the entire Interdisciplinary Team to promote the self-actualization of all residents.

B7
Music and Memory
Dan Cohen
Debra Jacoby
Kim Loose ​​​
This session will focus on how music should be person-specific and how a total music personalization magnifies the benefits of music for persons with dementia. The presenters will show how an I-pod, along with favorite music, adds quality of life for a person with dementia. The Music & Memory website and the Wisconsin Music & Memory Initiative will also be reviewed.

Participants will learn:
1. How personalized music maximizes therapeutic outcomes for individuals with a variety of cognitive and physical issues.
2. How to initiate a pilot or facility-wide I-pod program.
3. How to overcome initial program concerns of equipment cost and loss.

B8
Geriatric Sleep in Long Term Care- Can We Get Better ZZZs?
Timothy Juergens​​​
This session is a repeat, see A7 for the summary of the presentation.

B9
The CMS Hand in Hand Toolkit: What Leaders Need to Know to Support Person-Centered Care
Karen Schoeneman​​​
This session is a repeat, see A9 for the summary of the presentation.

B10
Care That Matters:  Providing Person-Centered Dementia Care
Suzanna Waters Castillo ​​​
Not just another 101 about the basics of care for a person with dementia. This presentation will provide the principles of needs-based care, which emphasize meeting the person's emotional needs and thereby providing 'care that matters' for persons with dementia.
 
Participants will learn:
1. The emotional aspects of dementia.
2. Methods of observing and interpreting behaviors of nonverbal persons.
3. How to analyze caregiver behaviors that enhance and detract from person-centered care.



Tuesday, November 19
Breakout Sessions: "C" Series 2:30-4 p.m.  

Choose one of the following:

C1
Let Me Be Me! Let's Do it Drug Free: Using Culture Change and Resident-Centered Care Approach to Reduce Medications
THIS WORKSHOP IS FULL
Janice Baron Dombrowski
Cagney Martin
Merry Wimmer​​​
This session is a repeat, see A1 for the summary of the presentation.

C2
Discovering the Environmental Differences in Person-Centered Care
Paula Gibson
Eve Montgomery ​​​
This session is a repeat, see B2 for the summary of the presentation.

C3
Understanding Behaviors of the Different Dementias
THIS WORKSHOP IS FULL
Kim Peterson ​​​
This session is a repeat, see A2 for the summary of the presentation.

C4
Organizational Practices for Engaging Staff in Reducing Antipsychotic Medications
Cathie Brady
Barbara Frank ​​​
This session is a repeat, see B4 for the summary of the presentation.

C5
Meaningful Engagement, Positive Outcomes

Mary Ellen O’Connell
Patty Morter ​​​

This session is a repeat, see A3 for the summary of the presentation.

C6
They Still Have Rights: The Art of Promoting Resident Rights In An Era of Non-Pharmacologic Dementia Care
Matt Rohloff
Joan Schmitz
Phyllis “Flip” Varsos ​​​
This session is a repeat, see B6 for the summary of the presentation.

C7
Music and Memory
Dan Cohen
Debra Jacoby
Kim Loose ​​​
This session is a repeat, see B7 for the summary of the presentation.

C8
Regulating Pain
Ashok Choithani ​​​
This session is a repeat, see A8 for the summary of the presentation.

C9
Forms of Dementia: What We have Learned from Research
Whitney Wharton​​​
This session is a repeat, see A10 for the summary of the presentation.
C10
Care That Matters:  Providing Person-Centered Dementia Care
Suzanna Waters Castillo ​​​
This session is a repeat, see B10 for the summary of the presentation.
 
 
 
 

 Keynote: Wednesday, November 20, 2013

 
"Quality Assurance and Performance Improvement (QAPI): 
  New Program or What We Do Every Day?"
David Gifford, MD, MPH​​​
What is QAPI?  Is this a new program?  How do I implement QAPI?  This session will describe how QAPI is not new, not a discrete program to layer on top of what we already do.  Rather, QAPI is a comprehensive program that brings together the basic principles common to all quality improvement programs that have been shown to improve individual outcomes, to increase staff satisfaction and retention and avoid survey deficiencies.  Strategies to overcome common challenges faced by nursing homes and assisted living to implement QAPI will be discussed.
 
Participants will learn:
1. How to identify the five principles of QAPI.
2. To recognize top down vs. bottom up leadership strategies to implement QAPI in your organization.
3. To apply strategies to more effectively conduct root cause analysis. 
 
 

 


Wednesday, November 20
Breakout Sessions: "D" Series 10:15-11:45 a.m.  

Choose one of the following:

D1
Designing and Implementing an Antibiotic Stewardship Program in a Long-Term Care Facility Focusing on A Multidisciplinary Approach
THIS WORKSHOP IS FULL
Zina Gugkaeva​​​
An antibiotic stewardship program led by pharmacists was implemented at the Memorial Nursing and Rehabilitation Center, Medford, Wisconsin. In the first three months after implementation, the inappropriate antibiotic prescribing was reduced by 50%. The goal of this presentation is to share the experience of developing a successful antibiotic stewardship program in a long term care facility. The stewardship model at the Memorial Nursing and Rehab Center is a collaborative effort involving all health care providers: pharmacists, nurses, physicians, physical therapists, wound care specialists and others. The program will focus on specific steps in evaluating the appropriateness of antibiotic therapy and the roles of various health care providers in delivering optimal patient care.

Participants will learn:
1. The process of selecting appropriate antibiotic therapy.
2. The importance of an interdisciplinary approach to antibiotic stewardship.
3. Key resources for development of antibiotic stewardship in their facilities.

D2
Legal and Ethical Aspects of Medical Decision Making and Advance Care Planning
THIS WORKSHOP IS FULL
Marshall Kapp ​​​
This session, combining a didactic presentation and group discussion of a case(s), will explore the legal and ethical aspects of making decisions for seriously ill older individuals. Specific topics will include competing ethical principles, evaluation of decision making capacity, the elements of informed consent, the roles of resident/professionals/family members/the courts in the medical decision making process, and the use of mechanisms including advance directives and physician orders for life-sustaining treatment to facilitate decision making.

Participants will learn:
1. How to discuss the legal and ethical issues that may arise within the context of making and carrying out medical care decisions by and for residents with serious illness.
2. How to recognize the emotional and ethical strains that affect family members as part of the process of making medical care decisions for residents with serious illness.
3. How to identify potential opportunities where professionals can skillfully and compassionately assist residents and families with their planning for the need to make difficult medical decisions in the future (for example, through advance directives and/or Physician Orders for Life-Sustaining Treatment).

D3
One Size Does NOT Fit All! Nutrition Solutions for Pressure Ulcers: From Frail Older Adults to Obese Individuals
Becky Dorner​​​
Sometimes it's hard to know how to provide nutrition care for pressure ulcers, especially when your residents vary from the person with unintended weight loss to the person who is obese. This session will cover the topic of sarcopenia, a serious problem for both the frail older adult and the obese person, which can lead to risk of pressure ulcer development. The presenter will review the most current evidence-based research available related to medical nutrition therapy (MNT) for pressure ulcer prevention and treatment, along with how to interpret and apply current evidence for nutrition treatment of pressure ulcers: calories, protein, amino acids, fluids, vitamins and minerals. The presenter will share validated tools for screening for malnutrition, undernutrition and unintended weight loss, share formulas for determining nutritional needs, and provide practical suggestions for the most effective nutrition interventions for reversal of chronic undernutrition (inadequate protein, energy and micronutrient) intake for this population.

Participants will learn:
1. How to use validated nutrition screening tools to determine nutrition risk and need for referral to the RD or RDN.
2. Current evidence-based science for nutrition's role in the treatment of pressure ulcers.
3. Evidence-based information related to nutrition interventions for the treatment of pressure ulcers for people of different sizes and conditions.

D4
Community-Based Transitional Care Improvement: Reviewing the Roles of Hospitals and Post-Acute Care Providers
Jane Brock ​​​
This presentation will describe trends in Medicare readmissions, how to measure readmission rates, and why readmissions are an important focus of Medicare reform under the Affordable Care Act. The presenter will explore the importance of partnerships between hospitals and post-acute care providers and role of community coalitions to produce sustainable improvement in care transitions quality Examples of strategies used by high performing communities in the QIO integrating care for populations and communities aim, will also be included.

Participants will learn:
1. National, statewide and local trends in Medicare hospital readmissions, and different methods of measuring readmission rates.
2. The best practices of hospital – long term residence partnerships in reducing readmissions.
3. What systems should be in place for sustainment of quality care transitions.

D5
Deep Tissue: The State of the Science
Joyce Black ​​​
During this session, the presenter will discuss the importance of deep tissue injury.

Participants will learn:
1. The causes of deep tissue injury.
2. Methods to prevent deep tissue injury.
3. To identify usual presentations of deep tissue injury.

D6
Assessing Medication Appropriateness in the Elderly: Focus on Beers Criteria
THIS WORKSHOP IS FULL
Doug Englebert​​​
This presentation will include a review of medications that carry risk in the elderly population. It is critical to understand the 2012 Beers Criteria and its importance in clinical decision-making for residents.

Participants will learn:
1. How the Beers Criteria is used.
2. To identify categories of medications.
3. STOPP & START Criteria.

D7
A.S.P.E.N. Enteral Nutrition Practice Recommendations: Applying Them to Your Practice
Ainsley Malone ​​​
Enteral nutrition (EN), the delivery of nutrients via an enteral access device, is the feeding option of choice in those who have a functional gastrointestinal tract.  While the complications associated with EN are fewer than with parenteral nutrition, complications occur, including among others, pulmonary aspiration, formula contamination and enteral misconnections. Selected practice recommendations pertaining to the delivery of EN will be presented.

Participants will learn:
1. Three serious potential adverse events associated with enteral feedings.
2. Practice recommendations for enteral nutrition delivery, enteral access and enteral nutrition monitoring.

 
D8
Diabetes Management in Health Care: Whose Responsibility is it Anyway?
Kim Fox
The session will include current criteria for diabetes diagnosis.  Type 1 versus Type 2 diabetes, evaluation of blood glucose data, the benefits following a consistent carbohydrate diet and its implementation.  Information will also be provided on physical activity, review of current diabetes medications and hypo and hyperglycemia causes and treatments which could further address pressure sores, other medications that affect blood glucose control, stress, and depression.
 
Participants will learn:
1. Current criteria for diabetes diagnosis - Type 1 versus Type 2 diabetes.
2. Benefits of following a consistent carbohydrate diet.
3. Update on current diabetes medications and other medications impact on individuals with diabetes.

D9
Delirium - An Enormous Under-recognized Problem of Even Bigger Consequences
Josh Chodosh ​​​
Delirium has enormous consequences for patients, families, healthcare providers, and the systems where healthcare is delivered.  The incidence is high and missed opportunities for both prevention and treatment are common.  This session will highlight the prevalence, underlying etiology, healthcare costs and potential solutions.
 
Participants will learn:
1. The negative impact of delirium occurrence.
2. Common etiologies of delirium leading to key strategies for delirium prevention.
3. Key tools of delirium assessment.

D10
Dementia and Depression THIS WORKSHOP IS FULL
Kenneth Robbins ​​​
This session will address the epidemiology, symptoms and treatment of dementia and depression. It will include discussion of their overlap and differences, how to evaluate potential depression in someone with dementia, how to assess suicide risk and how to intervene.

Participants will learn:
1. The overlap of depression and dementia symptoms.
2. Why depression and suicidal ideation are often missed in the elderly.
3. How to assess suicide risk.


Wednesday, November 20
Breakout Sessions: "E" Series 12:45-2:15 p.m.  

Choose one of the following:

E1
Legal and Ethical Aspects of Medical Decision Making and Advance Care Planning
THIS WORKSHOP IS FULL
Marshall Kapp ​​​
This session is a repeat, see D2 for the summary of the presentation.

E2
Differentiating Geriatric Depression and Grief in Long Term Care Settings
THIS WORKSHOP IS FULL
Joseph Goveas ​​​
In this session the presenter will discuss the differences of geriatric depression and grief.
 
Participants will learn:
1. How to recognize and diagnose geriatric depression.
2. Differences between grief and depression in late-life.
3. Various treatment choices for depression in late-life.

E3
One Size Does NOT Fit All! Nutrition Solutions for Pressure Ulcers: From Frail Older Adults to Obese Individuals
Becky Dorner​​​
This session is a repeat, see D3 for the summary of the presentation.

E4
Community-Based Transitional Care Improvement: Reviewing the Roles of Hospitals and Post-Acute Care Providers
Jane Brock​​​
This session is a repeat, see D4 for the summary of the presentation.

E5
Deep Tissue: The State of the Science
Joyce Black ​​​
This session is a repeat, see D5 for the summary of the presentation.

E6
Diabetes Management in Health Care: Whose Responsibility is it Anyway?
Kim Fox
This session is a repeat, see D8 for the summary of the presentation.

E7
Redefining Adult Malnutrition: Where Are We Now?
Ainsley Malone ​​​
Defining malnutrition in adult patients/residents has previously relied on markers not relective of nutrition status and also on a lack of appreciation of the disease-nutrition relationship.  A standard definition and etiology for dignosing malnutrition was recently developed under the charge of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics.  It is important for adult clinical nutrition practitioners to understand this new approach to defining malnutrition and learn how it may be incorporated into practice.
 
Participants will learn:
1. The three etiology based malnutrition diagnosis categories.
2. The 6 characteristics/markers for diagnosing malnutrition.
3. A strategic approach to implementing the new diagnostic criteria and definitions.

E8
7 Ways to Prevent a Crisis-THIS WORKSHOP IS FULL
Peter Leidy ​​​
Many people labeled with 'challenging behavior' spiral into crisis through actions and events that could have been avoided. Many crises are caused unintentionally by the system, the team or the behavior plan. When people are lonely and disconnected, when life is dull, when a 'home' does not feel like home, when a place where someone spends the day is not a good match, the likelihood of unwanted behavior increases. This is not a session about techniques, but rather about how paying attention to how quality of life relates to crisis prevention.

Participants will learn:
1. The importance of listening deeply to people being supported.
2. The relationship between holistic positive support and crisis prevention.
3. Ethical dilemmas in our work.

E9
Delirium - An Enormous Under-recognized Problem of Even Bigger Consequences
Josh Chodosh ​​​
This session is a repeat, see D9 for the summary of the presentation.

E10
Wisconsin Coalition for Collaborative Excellence in Assisted Living (WCCEAL)
Kevin Coughlin
Alfred Johnson
David Zimmerman ​​​
The Wisconsin Coalition for Collaborative Excellence in Assisted Living (WCCEAL) is a Public/Private collaboration with the Wisconsin Department of Health Services, Wisconsin’s four provider associations, Wisconsin’s advocacy agency and the Center for Health Systems Research & Analysis. The goal is to incentivize Assisted Living Communities to strive for excellence through internal quality improvement and help define the level of excellence that will be recognized by regulatory agencies, public funding agencies, insurance companies, assisted living communities, advocates, legislators, general public and other key stakeholders.

Participants will learn:
1. What WCCEAL is all about.
2. Why national organizations are so interested in what Wisconsin is up to.
3. If you are not in WCCEAL, why you should be.


Wednesday, November 20
Breakout Sessions: "F" Series 2:30-4 p.m.  

Choose one of the following:

F1
Designing and Implementing an Antibiotic Stewardship Program in a Long-Term Care Facility Focusing on A Multidisciplinary Approach
This
session is a repeat, see D1 for the summary of the presentation.

F2
Behavioral Disturbances in Dementia: Treatment Choices
THIS WORKSHOP IS FULL
Joseph Goveas​​​
In this session the presenter will discuss the behavioral disturbances in dementia.

Participants will learn:
1. The epidemiology of Behavioral and Psychological Symptoms of Dementia (BPSD).
2. An update on pharmacological and non-pharmacological interventions for managing BPSD.
3. Appropriate treatment options for BPSD.

F3
Minimizing Relocation Stress through Discharge Planning
Thomas LaDuke​​​
This session will focus on a discussion of strategies for identifying relocation stress and taking steps for mitigating symptoms through discharge planning.

Participants will learn:
1. How to define and identify relocation stress syndrome.
2. How to prevent/minimize symptoms of relocation stress through discharge planning.
3. Where to find and interpret regulations related to resident discharges/facility closure.

F4
DQA Perspective on Assisted Living Complaints
Nikki Andrews
Cheryl Bott
Carolyn Happel
Mary Beth Hoffman Lynnette Traas
Bill Gardner (Moderator) ​​​
What happens when the state receives a complaint about an assisted living facility? This panel presentation will review the Bureau of Assisted Living (BAL) procedures for handling complaints and will share data surrounding complaint subject areas. DQA staff will provide examples of complaints that were investigated and the results of those investigations. The examples may also help attendees as they deal with residents, families and staff who have concerns. The BAL enforcement specialist will be present to answer enforcement questions related to substantiated complaints.

Participants will learn:
1. How BAL addresses complaints.
2. The top three complaint areas in CBRFs, AFHs and RCACs.
3. Strategies to reduce complaints and improve satisfaction of residents, families and staff.

F5
HIPAA for LTC: New Rules Signal a Need to Review (or create) Compliance Policies
Brian Purtell ​​​
Ne
w rules and significant enforcement actions makes it imperative that providers assure compliance with the multitude of provider obligations and residents’ rights under the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act of 1996 (HIPAA). This session will refresh the fundamentals of the original HIPAA Privacy and Security regulations. We will move to the HITECH rules that added a layer, and finally delve into the significant regulations released in early 2013. This presentation is intended to be an introduction to the multiple HIPAA obligations and is particularly timely as enforcement actions have begun against Covered Entities and will continue to expand with the recently released clarification rules. Assisted Living providers are in particular need of training on HIPAA, as most were likely not covered by the rules in 2003 when the first substantive rules were released, but may now be subject to the law either directly as Covered Entities or indirectly as Business Associates.

Participants will learn:
1. A clearer understanding of the HIPAA regulatory framework and the provider obligations as well as resident rights created by the law.
2. The important regulations issued that have added significant compliance obligations and increased penalties associated with non-compliance.
3. Information to better equip them to review their current policies in the area of privacy and confidentiality to assure that they are consistent with the HIPAA obligations.

F6
Assessing Medication Appropriateness in the Elderly: Focus on Beers Criteria
THIS WORKSHOP IS FULL
Doug Englebert
This
session is a repeat, see D6 for the summary of the presentation.

F7
Redefining Adult Malnutrition: Where Are We Now?
Ainsley Malone ​​​
This session is a repeat, see E7 for the summary of the presentation.

F8
Whose Life Is It, Anyway?
THIS WORKSHOP IS FULL
Peter Leidy ​​​
This session looks at power, control, and decision-making in the lives of adults with disabilities. When a person is 'placed' in a home he/she had no choice about, when a 51-year-old woman is told by her 24-year-old staff person that it is time for bed at 8:30 pm, when 'outings' are scheduled only twice a week for a very active young adult, we need to ask questions. Questions such as, 'Who is making the choice here?' 'Who gets to decide?' 'Whose life IS it, anyway?

Participants will learn:
1. The need for respectfully supporting a person to have as much choice/freedom as possible.
2. The need for meaningful relationships in the lives of people served.
3. The importance of supporting each other as co-workers/colleagues

F9
On the Road with the Kenosha County Care Transitions Coalition

Helen Sampson  
Barbara Beardsley
Jody Sadlon ​​​

This presentation will provide an overview of one coalition's inception and development highlighting successes and challenges on the road to reducing preventable readmissions. The presenters will also discuss root cause analysis, data collection and the interventions developed by this community to address this goal.

Participants will learn:
1. A model for starting and maintaining momentum in a community coalition.
2. A model of root cause analysis and the importance of ongoing data collection.
3. To identify and develop interventions.

F10
Legal Protections for Persons with Dementia
Tom Hlavacek
​​
This presentation will review the findings and recommendations of the Wisconsin Alzheimer's Challenging Behaviors Task Force. The presenter will review the Helen EF Supreme Court decision and subsequent legislative proposals regarding the use of Wisconsin Statutes Chapter 51 and 55 to provide services and treatment to persons with dementia in appropriate settings.

Participants will learn:
1. The differences between Chapters 51 and 55 as they relate to persons with dementia.
2. The proposed dementia-related legislative revisions to Chapter 55.
3. A suggested model of community interventions and services for persons with dementia in crisis and in need of protective services.

 

 Sponsored by: 
The Department of Health Services, Division of Quality Assurance​