Human Responses to Climate Change Resources


  
collapse Topic : Causes of Climate Change ‎(2)
Cyclical and Natural Changes
Human-Caused Changes
collapse Topic : Climate System ‎(12)
Atmospheric Circulation
Atmospheric Composition
Carbon Cycle
Climate Compared to Weather
Climate Feedbacks
Global Energy Balance
Greenhouse Effect
Ocean and Climate
Orbital Cycles
Regional Climates
Solar Radiation
Water Cycle
collapse Topic : Human Responses to Climate Change ‎(3)
Personal Responsibility
Risk Management
Social Values
collapse Topic : Impacts of Climate Change ‎(13)
Agricultural Changes
Economic Impacts
Ecosystem Changes
Extreme Weather
Freshwater Resources
Great Lakes Impacts
Melting Ice and Permafrost
Ocean Warming and Acidification
Plants and Animals
Public Health
Sea Level Rise
Surface Temperature Warming
Uncertainty
collapse Topic : Measuring and Modeling Climate ‎(2)
Climate Modeling
Gathering and Measuring Climate Data

Social Values

Activities

Lesson 6: Making Climate Change Connections. Climate Change: Connections and Solutions. Facing the Future. Grades 6-8. http://www.facingthefuture.org/Curriculum/ClimateChangeGrades68/tabid/453/Default.aspx. Students read about impacts of climate change experienced by people living in different environments around the world and then discuss how these impacts are connected.

Lesson 6: Changes All Around: Geographic Impacts of Climate Change. Climate Change: Connections and Solutions. Facing the Future. Grades 9-12. http://www.facingthefuture.org/Curriculum/ClimateChangeGrades912/tabid/454/Default.aspx. In small groups, students examine the climate of countries in different environments and then predict what might happen to the climate of a particular country as the earth warms.

No Fair! The Inequities of Climate Change by Earth Day Network. http://ww2.earthday.net/pdf/Equity%20and%20Climate.pdf. This lesson plan introduces students to the issues of equity surrounding climate change. Students will explore the differences between developed and developing countries and learn how climate change affects these parts of the world differently.

Climate Around the World. SERC Cutting Edge. Grades 6-12. http://serc.carleton.edu/NAGTWorkshops/complexsystems/activities/climate_around_the_world.html. This activity introduces students to global climate patterns by having each student collect information about the climate in a particular region of the globe. After collecting information, students share data through posters in class and consider factors that lead to differences in climate in different parts of the world. Finally, students synthesize the information to see how climate varies around the world.

Eyewitnesses to Change. Smithsonian-National Museum of Natural History. Grades 6-8. http://forces.si.edu/arctic/pdf/ACT%201_EYEWITNESS.pdf. Students explore recent changes in the Arctic's climate that have been observed and documented by indigenous Arctic residents. Students watch a video, take notes, and create a concept map. Students also examine and graph historical weather data and indigenous data for an Arctic community. Students explain why natives are critical observers.

Exploring Regional Differences in Climate Change. Earth Exploration Toolbook from SERC. Grades 9-12. http://serc.carleton.edu/eet/climate/index.html. This teaching activity addresses regional variability as predicted in climate change models for the next century. Using real climatological data from climate models, students will obtain annual predictions for minimum temperature, maximum temperature, precipitation, and solar radiation for Minnesota and California to explore this regional variability. Students import the data into a spreadsheet application and analyze it to interpret regional differences. Finally, students download data for their state and compare them with other states to answer a series of questions about regional differences in climate change.

Lesson 7: How Much Does Carbon Cost? Climate Change: Connections and Solutions. Facing the Future. Grades 6-8. http://www.facingthefuture.org/Curriculum/ClimateChangeGrades68/tabid/453/Default.aspx. Students evaluate structural solutions to regulate carbon emissions and play a cap and trade game, finding ways to reduce emissions in the most cost-effective manner.

Lesson 9: Energy Policies for a Cool Future. Climate Change: Connections and Solutions. Facing the Future. Grades 6-8. http://www.facingthefuture.org/Curriculum/ClimateChangeGrades68/tabid/453/Default.aspx. Students discuss energy impacts and suggest policies for addressing global climate change related to energy use at a “World Climate Change Summit."

Lesson 7: How Much Does Carbon Cost? Climate Change: Connections and Solutions. Facing the Future. Grades 9-12. http://www.facingthefuture.org/Curriculum/ClimateChangeGrades912/tabid/454/Default.aspx. Students evaluate structural solutions to regulate carbon emissions and play a cap and trade game, finding ways to reduce emissions in the most cost-effective manner.

Reading 4: Climate Justice. Climate Change: Connections and Solutions. Facing the Future. Grades 6-12. http://www.facingthefuture.org/Curriculum/ClimateChangeGrades68/tabid/453/Default.aspx. Impacts of climate change on human health and migration.

Reading 5: What’s Happening Out There? Climate Change: Connections and Solutions. Facing the Future. Grades 6-12. http://www.facingthefuture.org/Curriculum/ClimateChangeGrades68/tabid/453/Default.aspx. Examples of climate change solutions undertaken by governments and businesses.

Equity and Climate. Earth Day Network. Grades 9-12. http://www.eeweek.org/assets/EDN%20Lesson%20Plans/EquityandClimate.pdf. This classroom activity introduces equity issues surrounding climate change. Students research the assigned developed and developing nations, discuss climate change, and label the differences between energy usage and the effects of climate change on two world maps. In the end, the class negotiates an energy treaty.

Global Warming Webquest. Marian Koshland Science Museum – National Academy of Science. Grades 6-12. http://www.koshland-science-museum.org/teachers/wq-gw-gd001.jsp. In this Webquest activity, students assume roles of scientist, business leader, or policy maker. The students then collaborate as part of a climate action team and learn how society and the environment might be impacted by global warming. They explore the decision making process regarding issues of climate change, energy use, and available policy options. Student teams investigate how and why climate is changing and how humans may have contributed to these changes. Upon completion of their individual tasks, student teams present their findings and make recommendations that address the situation.

Community Conversation. Climate Change: A Wisconsin Activity Guide. Grades 7-12. http://dnr.wi.gov/org/caer/ce/eek/teacher/Climateguide/pdf/04-5672-conversation.pdf. This section of the activity guide provides an activity and worksheets to help students sort through the various ecological, economic, and social implications of climate change and how there are many perspectives on the issue.

Climate Change in the News. Climate Change: A Wisconsin Activity Guide. Wisconsin DNR. Grades 7-12. http://dnr.wi.gov/org/caer/ce/eek/teacher/Climateguide/PDF/03-4650-relationship.pdf. This section of the Activity Guide provides an activity and worksheets to help students synthesize how climate change is addressed in the media and how outlooks on climate change may vary by location.

Science Inspires Art Inspires Society. Climate Change: A Wisconsin Activity Guide. Wisconsin DNR. Grades 7-12. http://dnr.wi.gov/org/caer/ce/eek/teacher/Climateguide/PDF/05-7475-society.pdf. This section of the Activity Guide provides an activity to help students express their climate change views through an art project.

Artsy Activism: A Service Learning Activity. Climate Change: A Wisconsin Activity Guide. Wisconsin DNR. Grades 7-12. http://dnr.wi.gov/org/caer/ce/eek/teacher/Climateguide/PDF/05-7681-activism.pdf. This section of the Activity Guide gives students the opportunity to complete a service learning project to better understand the causes of climate change and educate their school and community.

Climate Change and People. Your Climate, Your Future by World Wildlife Federation. Grades 9-12. http://www.worldwildlife.org/climate/curriculum/WWFBinaryitem5964.pdf. Read and discuss real news articles on the social impacts of climate change, and how impacts on the economy and habitat will affect people. In groups, students determine the top-five risks for humans and present to the class.

Climate Change in My City. Your Climate, Your Future by World Wildlife Federation. Grades 9-12. http://www.worldwildlife.org/climate/curriculum/WWFBinaryitem5966.pdf. Analyze climate change at local, regional, and global scales using an historical climate index.

Write On! Your Climate, Your Future by World Wildlife Federation. Grades 9-12. http://www.worldwildlife.org/what/globalmarkets/Climate%20Change/Climate%20Cirriculum/WWFBinaryitem5972.pdf. Express views and knowledge of climate change in the community by writing federal political officials, local political officials, and regional newspapers, giving students a voice on climate change and their concerns for their futures and the future of their community.

Videos

60 Minutes: Rewriting Science. CBS Broadcasting, Inc. (2006). Grades 9-12. An interview with Jim Hanson, a NASA scientist at the forefront of global warming studies. The interview reveals the White House's attempts to suppress Hanson's words and the edits made to reports on climate change.

Young Voices on Climate Change. Grades 5-12. http://www.youngvoicesonclimatechange.com/. A film series featuring young people who are making a difference! They are shrinking the carbon footprint of their homes, schools and communities. You, too, can do something about global warming! Hot Politics. PBS Video. (2007). This PBS Frontline documentary focuses on the politics surrounding global warming and how divisions within and among political parties has led to inaction on the part of the U.S. in response to climate change. Includes a discussion of the Kyoto protocol and the steps now being taken by local and state governments to cap carbon dioxide emissions.

Solutions: What's Being Done About Global Warming by Clean Air - Cool Planet. Clean Air Cool Planet, Portsmouth, NH. (2005). This video features stories from a business, college and a city that show how direct action to reduce greenhouse gas emissions that cause global warming is possible now- with positive economic results. The disc also includes a file of charts, graphs, and illustrations that can be used in presentations.

Books/Reports

The Solution is You! An Activist's Guide by Laurie David. Fulerum, Golden, CO. (2006). This is a guide that can easily "fit in your pocket." Stop Global Warming turns headlines into action, providing testimony of leading environmental activist Laurie David's own passionate work and showing how and why others (particularly young people) should get involved in this and other environmental issues. In accessible and inspiring prose, David explains that Global warming is not an opinion but a scientific reality, one that policy makers by and large have failed to address.

A Climate of Change: African Americans, Global Warming, and a Just Climate Policy in the U.S. by J. Andrew Hoerner and Nia Robinson. (2008). http://urbanhabitat.org/files/climateofchange-2.pdf. Everywhere we turn, the issues and impacts of climate change confront us. Though the media is dominated by images of polar bears, melting glaciers, flooded lands, and arid desserts, there is a human face to this story as well.

State of the World Population 2009 by UNFPA. (2009). http://www.unfpa.org/swp/2009/en. This report discusses population dynamics, reproductive health care, and human relationships across the globe with regard to women and their connection to climate change.

Up in Smoke? Threats from, and responses to, the impact of global warming on human development by Andrew Simms, New Economics Foundation, London. (2004). http://www.foe.co.uk/resource/reports/up_in_smoke.pdf. This report represents an unprecedented coming together of leading environmental and development organizations with decades of experience working with poor communities across the world. It discusses the impacts of climate change on human existence across the globe.

Weather Makers, The by Tim Flannery. Atlantic Monthly Press, New York, NY. (2005). The Weather Makers is both an urgent warning and a call to arms, outlining the history of climate change, how it will unfold over the next century, and what we can do to prevent a cataclysmic future. Along with a riveting history of climate change, Tim Flannery offers specific suggestions for action for both lawmakers and individuals, from investing in renewable power sources like wind, solar, and geothermal energy, to offering an action plan with steps each and every one of us can take right now to reduce deadly CO2 emissions by as much as 70 percent.

Facts and Trends to 2050: Energy and Climate Change by World Business Council for Sustainable Development, Earthprint Limited. (2004). http://www.wbcsd.org/DocRoot/xxSdHDlXwf1J2J3ql0I6/Basic-Facts-Trends-2050.pdf. This publication provides an overview of key facts and societal challenges to economic development, future energy demand and the impact that demand could have on the climate system.

Discovery of Global Warming, The by Spencer Weart. Harvard University Press, Cambridge, MA. (2003). In 2001 an international panel of distinguished climate scientists announced that the world was warming at a rate without precedent during at least the last ten millennia, and that warming was caused by the buildup of greenhouse gases from human activity. The story of how scientists reached that conclusion—by way of unexpected twists and turns—was the story Spencer Weart told in The Discovery of Global Warming. Now he brings his award-winning account up to date, revised throughout to reflect the latest science and with a new conclusion that shows how the scientific consensus caught fire among the general world public, and how a new understanding of the human meaning of climate change spurred individuals and governments to action.

Hell and High Water: Global Warming--The Solution and the Politics-- and What We Should Do by Joseph Romm. Harper Collins, New York, NY. (2006). Hell and High Water is nothing less than a wake-up call to the country. It is a searing critique of American environmental and energy policy, and a passionate call to action by a writer with a unique command of the science and politics of climate change.

Climate Change Begins at Home: Life on the two-way street of global warming by Dave Reay. MacMillan, London. (2005). Climate change is one of the greatest threats that humankind faces in the twenty-first century. But while government and industry fail to act, this book argues, we could all work to reduce greenhouse gas emissions by 60%, the level necessary to halt the current trend according to the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change. Packed with provocative case studies, calculations, and lifestyle comparisons, this entertaining and authoritative book makes the complexities of climatology tractable and challenges readers to rethink their notions of "doing their bit.”

General Web Resources

Pew Project on National Security, Energy, and Climate. Pew Environmental Group. http://www.pewenvironment.org/campaigns/pew-project-on-national-security-energy-climate/id/8589935509. The Pew Environment Group is dedicated to highlighting the critical links between national security, energy independence, the economy and climate change. In 2009, former Sen. John W. Warner joined with the Pew Project to engage state and municipal governments, local organizations and experts to address the climate-security nexus.

Pentagon, CIA Eye New Threat: Climate Change. NPR. http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=121352495. For the first time, Pentagon planners in 2010 will include climate change among the security threats identified in the Quadrennial Defense Review, the Congress-mandated report that updates Pentagon priorities every four years. Includes print story and audio.

Explore Your Eco-Region. Climate Change Wildlife and Wildlands: A Toolkit for Formal and Informal Educators. http://www.globalchange.gov/resources/educators/toolkit/explore. The Climate Change Wildlife and Wildlands Toolkit divides the country into 11 distinct “ecoregions” based on a number of factors including geography and habit type. You can explore the ecoregions and find the one you live in using the interactive map on the Toolkit Homepage or the list on the left hand navigation bar. However you explore the ecoregions you will find case studies and activities that will bring alive the impacts and solutions to climate change on Wildlife and Wildlands.

United States Global Change Research Program. http://www.globalchange.gov/. This web site is a well-organized resource for information on the many facets of climate change. Users can examine climate change impacts by region (including the Great Lakes), sector (such as ecosystems and society), and agency (how the United States federal agencies are related to climate change issues).

We’re in this together. Vital Climate Change Graphics by UNEP/GRID-Arendal, Arendal, Norway. http://www.grida.no/publications/vg/climate2/page/2692.aspx. This section discusses the international groups discussing climate change and how they are approaching the issues.

At what cost. Vital Climate Change Graphics by UNEP/GRID-Arendal, Arendal, Norway. http://www.grida.no/publications/vg/climate2/page/2693.aspx. This section discusses the monetary costs of reducing carbon emissions.

Costs. Union of Concerned Scientists Global Warming Hot Map. http://www.climatehotmap.org/global-warming-effects/economy.html. Discusses the costs of climate change, and how the most expensive option is inaction.

National Wildlife Federation’s Global Warming Site. http://www.nwf.org/Global-Warming.aspx. NWF’s global warming page contains up-to-date information on global warming’s effects on wildlife, conservation, and how both policies and personal decisions can help. Also contains information on Great Lakes impacts and Global Warming Fact Sheets and Clean Energy Solutions for each state.

In the Agencies by United States Global Change Research Program. http://www.globalchange.gov/agencies. This web site is a well-organized resource for information on the many facets of climate change. Users can examine climate change impacts by region (including the Great Lakes), sector (such as ecosystems and society), and agency (how the United States federal agencies are related to climate change issues).

Zerofootprint Challenge. http://usa.zerochallenge.org/. The Zerofootprint challenge encourages students across the world to take climate change into their own hands by competing to reduce their school’s environmental impact. Join to measure your footprint, and then challenge another school to a race to reduce!