Climate System Resources


  
collapse Topic : Causes of Climate Change ‎(2)
Cyclical and Natural Changes
Human-Caused Changes
collapse Topic : Climate System ‎(12)
Atmospheric Circulation
Atmospheric Composition
Carbon Cycle
Climate Compared to Weather
Climate Feedbacks
Global Energy Balance
Greenhouse Effect
Ocean and Climate
Orbital Cycles
Regional Climates
Solar Radiation
Water Cycle
collapse Topic : Human Responses to Climate Change ‎(3)
Personal Responsibility
Risk Management
Social Values
collapse Topic : Impacts of Climate Change ‎(13)
Agricultural Changes
Economic Impacts
Ecosystem Changes
Extreme Weather
Freshwater Resources
Great Lakes Impacts
Melting Ice and Permafrost
Ocean Warming and Acidification
Plants and Animals
Public Health
Sea Level Rise
Surface Temperature Warming
Uncertainty
collapse Topic : Measuring and Modeling Climate ‎(2)
Climate Modeling
Gathering and Measuring Climate Data

Atmospheric Composition

Activities

Ozone by Norman Anderson, Kendall/Hunt Publishing Company, Dubuque, IA. (1996). An activity guide specifically dealing with ozone and how it related to weather conditions, air quality, etc. Activities are presented in a useable format that is supplemented with a glossary and list of additional resources. Our Unique Atmosphere.

Your Climate, Your Future by World Wildlife Federation. Grades 9-12. http://www.worldwildlife.org/climate/curriculum/WWFBinaryitem5961.pdf. Read and discuss articles on the atmosphere to understand how heat-trapping gases work in the atmosphere and why they and carbon dioxide are necessary for life on Earth. Emissions of Heat-trapping Gasses.

Your Climate, Your Future by World Wildlife Federation. Grades 9-12. http://www.worldwildlife.org/climate/curriculum/WWFBinaryitem5962.pdf. Record how much energy they use at home to calculate their own carbon footprint. Students learn about atmospheric concentrations of heat-trapping gases and make predictions while identifying the sources of emissions.

Lesson 1: The Carbon Link. Climate Change: Connections and Solutions. Facing the Future. Grades 6-8. http://www.facingthefuture.org/Curriculum/ClimateChangeGrades68/tabid/453/Default.aspx. Students take on roles as part of an interactive carbon cycle model, then witness a demonstration of the greenhouse effect and explore its role in global climate change.

Lesson 2: Carbon Dioxide Trends. Climate Change: Connections and Solutions. Facing the Future. Grades 6-8. http://www.facingthefuture.org/Curriculum/ClimateChangeGrades68/tabid/453/Default.aspx. Students graph data to examine atmospheric carbon dioxide trends during the past 45 years and predict future carbon dioxide emissions. The activity closes with a discussion of ways to reduce carbon dioxide emissions.

Lesson 2: Carbon Dioxide Trends. Climate Change: Connections and Solutions. Facing the Future. Grades 9-12. http://www.facingthefuture.org/Curriculum/ClimateChangeGrades912/tabid/454/Default.aspx. Through an experiment, students explore Earth’s greenhouse effect and graph results of 3 scenarios to draw conclusions about how greenhouse gases affect air temperature."

How Greenhouse Gases Absorb Heat. American Museum of Natural History. Grades 9-12. http://www.amnh.org/education/resources/card_frame.php?rid=1476&rurlid=1450. In this experiment, students will observe two model atmospheres: one with normal atmospheric composition and another with an elevated concentration of carbon dioxide. These two contained atmospheres will be exposed to light energy from a sunny window or from a lamp. The carbon dioxide is produced by a simple reaction and tested using bromothymol blue (BTB).

Videos

Changes in the Ozone Layer. Teachers' Domain. Grades 6-12. http://www.teachersdomain.org/resource/ttv10.sci.ess.watcyc.ozone. This video segment produced by ThinkTV demonstrates how ozone is created in the upper atmosphere, explains its beneficial role, and explores the problem of ozone depletion.

General Web Resources

Holes in Student Understanding: Addressing Prevalent Misconceptions Regarding Atmospheric Environmental Chemistry by Sara C. Kerr and Kenneth A. Walz. http://www4.uwsp.edu/cnr/wcee/keep/HSSupplement/current/Holes_in_Student_Understanding-Addressing_Prevalent_Misconceptions_Regarding_Atmospheric_Environmental_Chemisty-Kerr_and_Walz_JCE_2007.pdf. A common misconception held by students is that ozone depletion contributes to global warming. It is important to make sure your students understand the differences between these two phenomena. Although there are common chemicals involved in both ozone depletion and the greenhouse effect, they take place in different parts of the atmosphere and have very different environmental effects. Cooling or heating, a balancing act.

Vital Climate Change Graphics by UNEP/GRID-Arendal, Arendal, Norway. http://www.grida.no/publications/vg/climate2/page/2687.aspx. This section describes how greenhouse gasses and other factors act to warm and cool the planet.