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2/9/2014Insects/biology/SiteAssets/images/news/blank.gif

WSAW Channel 7 Wausau
By Hannah Anderson
The winter we've had has numbed us to the bone so far here in Central Wisconsin.
The coldness may be a good thing in the long run for us, however not so much for the bugs.
A University of Wisconsin- Stevens Point Associate Biology Professor Jamee Hubbard said even though the cold slightly cut down the number of mosquitoes we should expect this summer, the weather is the hardest on emerald ash borer insects.
<DIV><div id='articleHeadline'>Biology professor says severe cold can be tough for insects too <a href='/biology/Pages/news.aspx#Insects'>MORE</a></div></DIV><DIV><div class='article'><a id='Insects'></a><h1 class='ms-rteElement-H1'>​Biology professor says severe cold can be tough for insects too</h1> <img src=/biology/SiteAssets/images/news/blank.gif style='float:right;'><div class="ExternalClass20617D0760DC419C9A8AFDC654532EF3"><p>​</p> <div>WSAW Channel 7 Wausau</div> <div>By Hannah Anderson</div> <div>The winter we've had has numbed us to the bone so far here in Central Wisconsin.</div> <div>The coldness may be a good thing in the long run for us, however not so much for the bugs.</div> <div>A University of Wisconsin- Stevens Point Associate Biology Professor Jamee Hubbard said even though the cold slightly cut down the number of mosquitoes we should expect this summer, the weather is the hardest on emerald ash borer insects.</div> <div><a href="/urc/uNews/Pages/WSAW-ColdInsects14.aspx">http://www.uwsp.edu/urc/uNews/Pages/WSAW-ColdInsects14.aspx</a></div></div> <br style='clear:both;' /></div></DIV>
  
2/5/2014Soybean Grant/biology/SiteAssets/images/news/blank.gif


The University of Wisconsin-Stevens Point will receive $150,000 of a $450,000 grant from the United Soybean Board for research led by Associate Professor of Biology Devinder Sandhu. The plant geneticist is renowned for work to improve soybean yield and quality.

The three-year grant begins March 1. At least 10 undergraduate students at UW-Stevens Point will work with Sandhu on this project aimed at improving genetic traits in soybeans.
The United States leads the world in producing soybeans, the second largest crop in Wisconsin. To stay competitive in the world soybean market, plant geneticists look for ways to produce soybeans with improved oil quality, sugar and protein content.
To improve soybean seed traits, Sandhu and his student researchers must first identify and characterize genes that control various traits. Sandhu was part of a group of scientists from all over the world who sequenced the entire soybean genome in 2010.
In 2013, his research confirmed that a “jumping gene” induced random mutations in soybean genes resulting in undesirable traits. He used “jumping gene” to characterize several soybean genes.
 
The next step is to test this on a larger scale. An estimated 100,000 plants will be grown at a collaborating research facility, Iowa State University. Students in Sandhu’s plant genetics lab at UW-Stevens Point will use several genetic and molecular approaches to determine the links between genes and characteristics.
“Knowing which genes control specific traits, we will be able to develop high yielding, disease- resistant and nutritionally superior soybean varieties,” he said.
The project provides training and research experience for undergraduate students, preparing them for graduate school or future jobs. These student researchers present their work at national and international scientific meetings and publish their work in scientific journals, Sandhu said.
“This will be a great tool for scientific community working on soybeans. I am proud that UW-Stevens Point is a central player and leader in this cutting-edge research,” he said.
<DIV><div id='articleHeadline'>UW-Stevens Point soybean researcher receives $150,000 grant <a href='/biology/Pages/news.aspx#Soybean Grant'>MORE</a></div></DIV><DIV><div class='article'><a id='Soybean Grant'></a><h1 class='ms-rteElement-H1'>​UW-Stevens Point soybean researcher receives $150,000 grant</h1> <img src=/biology/SiteAssets/images/news/blank.gif style='float:right;'><div class="ExternalClassA2C344D9F2034A8293ED21FDA4DEEDDC"><p><br />The University of Wisconsin-Stevens Point will receive $150,000 of a $450,000 grant from the United Soybean Board for research led by Associate Professor of Biology Devinder Sandhu. The plant geneticist is renowned for work to improve soybean yield and quality.</p> <div>The three-year grant begins March 1. At least 10 undergraduate students at UW-Stevens Point will work with Sandhu on this project aimed at improving genetic traits in soybeans.</div> <div>The United States leads the world in producing soybeans, the second largest crop in Wisconsin. To stay competitive in the world soybean market, plant geneticists look for ways to produce soybeans with improved oil quality, sugar and protein content.</div> <div>To improve soybean seed traits, Sandhu and his student researchers must first identify and characterize genes that control various traits. Sandhu was part of a group of scientists from all over the world who sequenced the entire soybean genome in 2010.</div> <div>In 2013, his research confirmed that a “jumping gene” induced random mutations in soybean genes resulting in undesirable traits. He used “jumping gene” to characterize several soybean genes.</div> <div> </div> <div>The next step is to test this on a larger scale. An estimated 100,000 plants will be grown at a collaborating research facility, Iowa State University. Students in Sandhu’s plant genetics lab at UW-Stevens Point will use several genetic and molecular approaches to determine the links between genes and characteristics.</div> <div>“Knowing which genes control specific traits, we will be able to develop high yielding, disease- resistant and nutritionally superior soybean varieties,” he said.</div> <div>The project provides training and research experience for undergraduate students, preparing them for graduate school or future jobs. These student researchers present their work at national and international scientific meetings and publish their work in scientific journals, Sandhu said.</div> <div>“This will be a great tool for scientific community working on soybeans. I am proud that UW-Stevens Point is a central player and leader in this cutting-edge research,” he said.</div> <div><a href="/urc/news/Pages/SandhuGrant14.aspx">http://www.uwsp.edu/urc/news/Pages/SandhuGrant14.aspx</a></div></div> <br style='clear:both;' /></div></DIV>
  
10/29/2013Breast Cancer/biology/SiteAssets/images/news/blank.gif

WAOW Channel 9 Wausau
By Cassandra Vinch
A UW-Stevens Point professor is taking her struggles with breast cancer to the classroom. She inherited the gene from her father and now wants to know more about it, in hopes of helping others.
If you look at Diane Caporale, you'd probably never know she's had breast cancer, twice.​
STORY and VIDEO​
<DIV><div id='articleHeadline'>UW-Stevens Point professor getting up close with breast cancer <a href='/biology/Pages/news.aspx#Breast Cancer'>MORE</a></div></DIV><DIV><div class='article'><a id='Breast Cancer'></a><h1 class='ms-rteElement-H1'>​UW-Stevens Point professor getting up close with breast cancer</h1> <img src=/biology/SiteAssets/images/news/blank.gif style='float:right;'><div class="ExternalClassBEC6A87118FF473FBDBBD81EA8695C0F"><p>​</p> <div>WAOW Channel 9 Wausau</div> <div>By Cassandra Vinch</div> <div>A UW-Stevens Point professor is taking her struggles with breast cancer to the classroom. She inherited the gene from her father and now wants to know more about it, in hopes of helping others.</div> <div>If you look at Diane Caporale, you'd probably never know she's had breast cancer, twice.​</div> <div>STORY and VIDEO​</div> <div><a href="/urc/uNews/Pages/WAOW-UnivEveCaporale13.aspx">http://www.uwsp.edu/urc/uNews/Pages/WAOW-UnivEveCaporale13.aspx</a></div> </div> <br style='clear:both;' /></div></DIV>
  
7/27/2013Tick research/biology/SiteAssets/images/news/blank.gif

Stevens Point Journal
By Luke Ranker
Ted Roeder spent the better part of his life outdoors. He practically lived outside while playing as a boy, four years as a park ranger in Yellowstone National Park, several years as a park ranger at Denali National Park in Alaska, and countless hours doing field work for a master’s degree and later a doctoral degree in botany. In all those years roaming the woods, Roeder was never concerned with a disease-carrying pest that’s becoming more common — ticks.
...The number of ticks carrying Lyme disease and anaplasmosis could be increasing. Diane Caporale, professor of molecular biology and genetics at the University of Wisconsin-Stevens Point, has been collecting and testing ticks around Lake Joanis in Schmeeckle Reserve since 2000. In that time, the number of ticks found to carry Lyme disease has jumped from 4 percent in 2000 to 36 percent last year. Caporale has seen similar results from testing ticks found on her own land near Stockton.
STORY and VIDEO
<DIV><div id='articleHeadline'>Professor studying tick population as tick-borne illnesses rise <a href='/biology/Pages/news.aspx#Tick research'>MORE</a></div></DIV><DIV><div class='article'><a id='Tick research'></a><h1 class='ms-rteElement-H1'>​Professor studying tick population as tick-borne illnesses rise</h1> <img src=/biology/SiteAssets/images/news/blank.gif style='float:right;'><div class="ExternalClass2F692F9F30DB4F7A9918DF69FDF942B9"><p>​</p> <div>Stevens Point Journal</div> <div>By Luke Ranker</div> <div>Ted Roeder spent the better part of his life outdoors. He practically lived outside while playing as a boy, four years as a park ranger in Yellowstone National Park, several years as a park ranger at Denali National Park in Alaska, and countless hours doing field work for a master’s degree and later a doctoral degree in botany. In all those years roaming the woods, Roeder was never concerned with a disease-carrying pest that’s becoming more common — ticks.</div> <div>...The number of ticks carrying Lyme disease and anaplasmosis could be increasing. Diane Caporale, professor of molecular biology and genetics at the University of Wisconsin-Stevens Point, has been collecting and testing ticks around Lake Joanis in Schmeeckle Reserve since 2000. In that time, the number of ticks found to carry Lyme disease has jumped from 4 percent in 2000 to 36 percent last year. Caporale has seen similar results from testing ticks found on her own land near Stockton.</div> <div>STORY and VIDEO</div> <div><a href="/urc/uNews/Pages/Caporale-tickborneillness.aspx">http://www.uwsp.edu/urc/uNews/Pages/Caporale-tickborneillness.aspx</a></div> </div> <br style='clear:both;' /></div></DIV>
  
7/9/2013Student Award/biology/SiteAssets/images/news/blank.gif

The legacy of excellence continues at the University of Wisconsin-Stevens Point, with the following recognized for achievement:
    UW-Stevens Point University Dining and Summer Conference Services won a gold award from the National Association for College and University Food Services in the category of Residential Dining Special Event - Medium School. Its winning program, “Titanic – A Dinner to Remember,” offered students food, décor and entertainment similar to that on the Titanic’s ill-fated trip in 1912.
    The gold award, the first-ever among UW System schools, was based on theme development and execution, menu and meal preparation, marketing and educational components. Using historical texts and photos, staff commemorated the 100th anniversary of the Titanic voyage. They now compete against Yale Dining (large school) and Brigham Hawaii Dining (small school) for the category's Grand Prize, decided later this month.
    BestColleges.com has recognized the UW-Stevens Point intramural sports program as one of the best in the nation. Colleges were vetted based on the number of intramural sports on their roster, comprehensive qualities of team management and coaching, and surveys sent to students assessing how enjoyable intramural sports were to play at each school.
    UW-Stevens Point offers 25 sports during two six-week blocks each semester to appeal to a variety of interests indoors and out. Participation has tripled in the past decade, giving students the chance to be physically active, get to know others and take a break from the pressures of academic life. See more at www.bestcolleges.com/features/best-colleges-for-intramural-sports.
    Corky McReynolds, director of UW-Stevens Point’s Treehaven field station in Tomahawk and a professor of natural resources, has become a certified professional facilitator (CPF) through the International Association of Facilitators. As one of three CPFs in the state and first in the UW System, McReynolds is certified to help groups and organizations with team development, strategic planning and management of projects, changes and conflicts.
     
    Lori Rusch, a May 2013 UW-Stevens Point graduate from West Bend, won a $5,000 fellowship from The Honor Society of Phi Kappa Phi. The daughter of Steve and Judy Rusch, she recently earned a degree in biology and German, and will continue her studies at the University of Wisconsin School of Veterinary Medicine.
<DIV><div id='articleHeadline'>Students and staff recognized for achievement <a href='/biology/Pages/news.aspx#Student Award'>MORE</a></div></DIV><DIV><div class='article'><a id='Student Award'></a><h1 class='ms-rteElement-H1'>​Students and staff recognized for achievement</h1> <img src=/biology/SiteAssets/images/news/blank.gif style='float:right;'><div class="ExternalClass830F3CD047824105BCC16F0C5A3B158A"><p>​</p> <div>The legacy of excellence continues at the University of Wisconsin-Stevens Point, with the following recognized for achievement:</div> <div>    UW-Stevens Point University Dining and Summer Conference Services won a gold award from the National Association for College and University Food Services in the category of Residential Dining Special Event - Medium School. Its winning program, “Titanic – A Dinner to Remember,” offered students food, décor and entertainment similar to that on the Titanic’s ill-fated trip in 1912.</div> <div>    The gold award, the first-ever among UW System schools, was based on theme development and execution, menu and meal preparation, marketing and educational components. Using historical texts and photos, staff commemorated the 100th anniversary of the Titanic voyage. They now compete against Yale Dining (large school) and Brigham Hawaii Dining (small school) for the category's Grand Prize, decided later this month.</div> <div>    BestColleges.com has recognized the UW-Stevens Point intramural sports program as one of the best in the nation. Colleges were vetted based on the number of intramural sports on their roster, comprehensive qualities of team management and coaching, and surveys sent to students assessing how enjoyable intramural sports were to play at each school.</div> <div>    UW-Stevens Point offers 25 sports during two six-week blocks each semester to appeal to a variety of interests indoors and out. Participation has tripled in the past decade, giving students the chance to be physically active, get to know others and take a break from the pressures of academic life. See more at <a href="http://www.bestcolleges.com/features/best-colleges-for-intramural-sports">www.bestcolleges.com/features/best-colleges-for-intramural-sports</a>.</div> <div>    Corky McReynolds, director of UW-Stevens Point’s Treehaven field station in Tomahawk and a professor of natural resources, has become a certified professional facilitator (CPF) through the International Association of Facilitators. As one of three CPFs in the state and first in the UW System, McReynolds is certified to help groups and organizations with team development, strategic planning and management of projects, changes and conflicts. </div> <div>     <br />   <strong> Lori Rusch, a May 2013 UW-Stevens Point graduate from West Bend, won a $5,000 fellowship from The Honor Society of Phi Kappa Phi. The daughter of Steve and Judy Rusch, she recently earned a degree in biology and German, and will continue her studies at the University of Wisconsin School of Veterinary Medicine.</strong></div> <div><a href="/urc/news/Pages/July13Honors.aspx">http://www.uwsp.edu/urc/news/Pages/July13Honors.aspx</a></div> </div> <br style='clear:both;' /></div></DIV>
  
2/25/2013Museum/biology/SiteAssets/images/news/blank.gif

The scientific research and teaching collections of animals, fish, plants and prehistoric specimens will be open to the public at the Fourth Annual Collection Crawl hosted by the University of Wisconsin-Stevens Point Museum of Natural History.
The open house will be held Saturday, March 9, from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m.  on campus, where more than 25,000 square feet is dedicated to museum collections.
The collection crawl includes collections housed within and beyond the museum, including the Freckman Herbarium. University students will be available to provide information and answer questions for the families, students and community members who attend. Participants can pick up free passports at the University Library and gather stamps for up to 11 collections throughout campus.
In addition to the museum exhibits, access will be available for the following collections: archaeology, entomology (insects), geology (rocks), herbarium (plants), herpetology (amphibians and reptiles), ichthyology (fish), mammalogy (mammals), ornithology (birds), paleontology (prehistoric life) and parasitology (parasites).
“The depth and breadth of the natural science collections held by UW-Stevens Point are astounding, and a credit to the faculty, students and members of the general public who have helped develop them,” said Ray Reser, director of the museum. “As one of the major educational outreach venues of the university, we are pleased to be able to provide community access to the specimens and scientific research that enhance our courses and make our exhibits possible.”
The UW-Stevens Point Museum of Natural History is an outreach and educational facility aligned with the College of Letters and Science. The only public natural history museum in North Central Wisconsin, the museum’s exhibits are located on the first floor of the University Library and may be viewed during regular library hours: Monday-Thursday, 7:45 a.m. to midnight; Friday, 7:45 a.m. to 9 p.m.; Saturday, 9 a.m. to 9 p.m.; and Sunday, 11 a.m. to midnight. Metered parking is located in Lot R, which is accessible from Portage or Reserve streets.
Reser is available for media interviews prior to and during the collection crawl. To contact the UW-Stevens Point Museum of Natural History, call 715-346-2858, email museum@uwsp.edu or visit www.uwsp.edu/museum.
<DIV><div id='articleHeadline'>UW-Stevens Point’s museum collections open to the public <a href='/biology/Pages/news.aspx#Museum'>MORE</a></div></DIV><DIV><div class='article'><a id='Museum'></a><h1 class='ms-rteElement-H1'>​UW-Stevens Point’s museum collections open to the public</h1> <img src=/biology/SiteAssets/images/news/blank.gif style='float:right;'><div class="ExternalClass9CD67F437E97460886ED23996F07ACAB"><p>​</p> <div>The scientific research and teaching collections of animals, fish, plants and prehistoric specimens will be open to the public at the Fourth Annual Collection Crawl hosted by the University of Wisconsin-Stevens Point Museum of Natural History.<br />The open house will be held Saturday, March 9, from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m.  on campus, where more than 25,000 square feet is dedicated to museum collections.<br />The collection crawl includes collections housed within and beyond the museum, including the Freckman Herbarium. University students will be available to provide information and answer questions for the families, students and community members who attend. Participants can pick up free passports at the University Library and gather stamps for up to 11 collections throughout campus.<br />In addition to the museum exhibits, access will be available for the following collections: archaeology, entomology (insects), geology (rocks), herbarium (plants), herpetology (amphibians and reptiles), ichthyology (fish), mammalogy (mammals), ornithology (birds), paleontology (prehistoric life) and parasitology (parasites).<br />“The depth and breadth of the natural science collections held by UW-Stevens Point are astounding, and a credit to the faculty, students and members of the general public who have helped develop them,” said Ray Reser, director of the museum. “As one of the major educational outreach venues of the university, we are pleased to be able to provide community access to the specimens and scientific research that enhance our courses and make our exhibits possible.”<br />The UW-Stevens Point Museum of Natural History is an outreach and educational facility aligned with the College of Letters and Science. The only public natural history museum in North Central Wisconsin, the museum’s exhibits are located on the first floor of the University Library and may be viewed during regular library hours: Monday-Thursday, 7:45 a.m. to midnight; Friday, 7:45 a.m. to 9 p.m.; Saturday, 9 a.m. to 9 p.m.; and Sunday, 11 a.m. to midnight. Metered parking is located in Lot R, which is accessible from Portage or Reserve streets.<br />Reser is available for media interviews prior to and during the collection crawl. To contact the UW-Stevens Point Museum of Natural History, call 715-346-2858, email <a href="mailto:museum@uwsp.edu">museum@uwsp.edu</a> or visit <a href="/museum">www.uwsp.edu/museum</a>.</div> <div><a href="/urc/news/Pages/CollectionCrawl13.aspx">http://www.uwsp.edu/urc/news/Pages/CollectionCrawl13.aspx</a></div> </div> <br style='clear:both;' /></div></DIV>
  
1/24/2013Aquaponics/biology/SiteAssets/images/news/blank.gif

The University of Wisconsin-Stevens Point will host its first international gathering of aquaponic experts on June 19-21.
“The International Aquaponics Conference: Aquaponics and Global Food Security” will bring together individuals with the goal of making an impact on food quality, security and sustainability using aquaponic methods, in which fish and plants are grown together in a symbiotic environment. Industry experts will share experience and knowledge in a fun and informative conference setting, providing participants a wealth of information on the rapidly growing aquaponics industry.
Those who should attend include current and prospective aquaponic growers, educators, ministers of agriculture, government representatives and those who manage agriculture, food and health regulations.
Conference highlights include:
    the latest in aquaponic technology, methods and applications;
    information from industry experts about aquaponics and how it is feeding people around the world;
    discussions on its use in commercial, education, mission and integrated systems as well as food safety, fish feeds and regulations;
    a poster contest and prizes for student aquaponic research;
    demonstrations by local chefs on a variety of ways to prepare aquaponically grown fish and vegetables, with samples of the culinary creations;
    tours of a 5,000-square-foot aquaponic greenhouse;
    a Wisconsin-style picnic featuring samples of the state’s finest cheese, bratwurst and beverages; and
    the launch and first meeting of the International Aquaponic Society, a UWSP Foundation organization dedicated to aquaponic research and education.
For more information and registration, visit www.uwsp.edu/AquaponicsConference or contact UW-Stevens Point Continuing Education at 1-800-898-9472 or 715-346-3838.
<DIV><div id='articleHeadline'>UW-Stevens Point to host International Aquaponics Conferenc <a href='/biology/Pages/news.aspx#Aquaponics'>MORE</a></div></DIV><DIV><div class='article'><a id='Aquaponics'></a><h1 class='ms-rteElement-H1'>​UW-Stevens Point to host International Aquaponics Conferenc</h1> <img src=/biology/SiteAssets/images/news/blank.gif style='float:right;'><div class="ExternalClass2E725308FB58462A8EC241F41FD1C793"><p>​</p> <div>The University of Wisconsin-Stevens Point will host its first international gathering of aquaponic experts on June 19-21.<br />“The International Aquaponics Conference: Aquaponics and Global Food Security” will bring together individuals with the goal of making an impact on food quality, security and sustainability using aquaponic methods, in which fish and plants are grown together in a symbiotic environment. Industry experts will share experience and knowledge in a fun and informative conference setting, providing participants a wealth of information on the rapidly growing aquaponics industry.<br />Those who should attend include current and prospective aquaponic growers, educators, ministers of agriculture, government representatives and those who manage agriculture, food and health regulations.<br />Conference highlights include:</div> <div>    the latest in aquaponic technology, methods and applications;<br />    information from industry experts about aquaponics and how it is feeding people around the world;<br />    discussions on its use in commercial, education, mission and integrated systems as well as food safety, fish feeds and regulations;<br />    a poster contest and prizes for student aquaponic research;<br />    demonstrations by local chefs on a variety of ways to prepare aquaponically grown fish and vegetables, with samples of the culinary creations;<br />    tours of a 5,000-square-foot aquaponic greenhouse;<br />    a Wisconsin-style picnic featuring samples of the state’s finest cheese, bratwurst and beverages; and<br />    the launch and first meeting of the International Aquaponic Society, a UWSP Foundation organization dedicated to aquaponic research and education. </div> <div>For more information and registration, visit <a href="/AquaponicsConference">www.uwsp.edu/AquaponicsConference</a> or contact UW-Stevens Point Continuing Education at 1-800-898-9472 or 715-346-3838.</div> <div><a href="/urc/news/Pages/AquaponicsConf13.aspx">http://www.uwsp.edu/urc/news/Pages/AquaponicsConf13.aspx</a></div></div> <br style='clear:both;' /></div></DIV>
  
12/4/2012Hybrid Soybeans/biology/SiteAssets/images/news/blank.gif

The benefits of studying genetics to grow a better soybean, the second-most popular crop grown in Wisconsin, is the topic of a free public presentation sponsored by the University of Wisconsin-Stevens Point.
Associate Professor of Biology Devinder Sandhu will present “Let’s Play Tag with ‘Jumping-Genes’: Soybean Research at UWSP” on Thursday, Dec. 13, at 7 p.m. in the Pinery Room of the Portage Country Public Library, 1001 Main Street, Stevens Point. A question and answer segment follows the lecture. The presentation is the fourth of the eight-part College of Letters and Science 2012-13 Community Lecture Series.
Sandhu was part of a group of scientists from all over the world who sequenced the entire soybean genome in 2010. The new soybeans serve as an excellent source of oil and protein. His research is supported by the U.S. Department of Agriculture, as well as the United Soybean Board.
“Although soybean genome is sequenced and we know about arrangement of the genes in the genome, still there is lot to learn,” said Sandhu. “Now the biggest challenge is to determine functions of these genes. Here at UW-Stevens Point, my lab is using several different genetic and molecular approaches to establish a link between genes and characters. Knowing which genes control specific traits, we will be able to develop high yielding, disease resistant and nutritionally superior soybean varieties.”
Currently, more than 25 UW-Stevens Point undergraduate students are part of Sandhu’s lab. “One of the main reasons I work at a teaching university is to work directly with undergraduates,” says Sandhu. “I truly invest in undergraduates.”
Sandhu earned his doctorate in agronomy at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln. He teaches several courses at UW-Stevens Point, including Introduction to Plant Biology, Principles of Genetics and Plant Genetics. He has also won numerous awards, including the UW-Stevens Point University Scholar Award, The Pucci Family Faculty Award, the Department of Biology Excellence in Scholarship Award and the UW System Faculty Diversity Research Award.
The entire College of Letters and Science Community Lecture Series schedule and previously recorded videos may be viewed at www.uwsp.edu/cols/lectureseries.
<DIV><div id='articleHeadline'>Benefits of hybrid soybeans examined at free lecture <a href='/biology/Pages/news.aspx#Hybrid Soybeans'>MORE</a></div></DIV><DIV><div class='article'><a id='Hybrid Soybeans'></a><h1 class='ms-rteElement-H1'>​Benefits of hybrid soybeans examined at free lecture</h1> <img src=/biology/SiteAssets/images/news/blank.gif style='float:right;'><div class="ExternalClassAC79F85CAAC9494F9D42B90BA05609A4"><p>​</p> <div>The benefits of studying genetics to grow a better soybean, the second-most popular crop grown in Wisconsin, is the topic of a free public presentation sponsored by the University of Wisconsin-Stevens Point.<br />Associate Professor of Biology Devinder Sandhu will present “Let’s Play Tag with ‘Jumping-Genes’: Soybean Research at UWSP” on Thursday, Dec. 13, at 7 p.m. in the Pinery Room of the Portage Country Public Library, 1001 Main Street, Stevens Point. A question and answer segment follows the lecture. The presentation is the fourth of the eight-part College of Letters and Science 2012-13 Community Lecture Series.<br />Sandhu was part of a group of scientists from all over the world who sequenced the entire soybean genome in 2010. The new soybeans serve as an excellent source of oil and protein. His research is supported by the U.S. Department of Agriculture, as well as the United Soybean Board.<br />“Although soybean genome is sequenced and we know about arrangement of the genes in the genome, still there is lot to learn,” said Sandhu. “Now the biggest challenge is to determine functions of these genes. Here at UW-Stevens Point, my lab is using several different genetic and molecular approaches to establish a link between genes and characters. Knowing which genes control specific traits, we will be able to develop high yielding, disease resistant and nutritionally superior soybean varieties.”<br />Currently, more than 25 UW-Stevens Point undergraduate students are part of Sandhu’s lab. “One of the main reasons I work at a teaching university is to work directly with undergraduates,” says Sandhu. “I truly invest in undergraduates.”<br />Sandhu earned his doctorate in agronomy at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln. He teaches several courses at UW-Stevens Point, including Introduction to Plant Biology, Principles of Genetics and Plant Genetics. He has also won numerous awards, including the UW-Stevens Point University Scholar Award, The Pucci Family Faculty Award, the Department of Biology Excellence in Scholarship Award and the UW System Faculty Diversity Research Award.<br />The entire College of Letters and Science Community Lecture Series schedule and previously recorded videos may be viewed at <a href="/cols/lectureseries">www.uwsp.edu/cols/lectureseries</a>. </div> <div><a href="/urc/news/Pages/COLSlecture12-Sandhu.aspx">http://www.uwsp.edu/urc/news/Pages/COLSlecture12-Sandhu.aspx</a></div> </div> <br style='clear:both;' /></div></DIV>
  
8/9/2012Brewing/biology/SiteAssets/images/news/blank.gif

Whether you make beer at a local business or at home, learn more about the brewing process at “Microbiology for Brewers” offered by the University of Wisconsin-Stevens Point Continuing Education on Saturday and Sunday, September 29-30.
Held in a fully equipped microbiology lab at UW-Stevens Point, the course will be taught by Associate Professor of Biology Terese Barta and will include the biological aspects of managing yeast and bacteria in the brewing process. Participants will also learn how to determine yeast populations, how to detect and identify bacterial contaminants and microscopic staining, and observation techniques.
Offered to a small group of 12 will allow for personalized attention for each participant. The course is for established brewers only, as this is not a course on how to brew beer.  The course cost of $169 includes all materials.
To register or for more information, call UW-Stevens Point Continuing Education at 1-800-898-9472, or visit www.uwsp.edu/conted/ConfWrkShp/Pages/BrewingMicrobiology.aspx.
<DIV><div id='articleHeadline'>Microbiology for Brewers course offered <a href='/biology/Pages/news.aspx#Brewing'>MORE</a></div></DIV><DIV><div class='article'><a id='Brewing'></a><h1 class='ms-rteElement-H1'>​Microbiology for Brewers course offered</h1> <img src=/biology/SiteAssets/images/news/blank.gif style='float:right;'><div class="ExternalClass16D582FC82E249C88D9BDC5F990A7FA9"><p>​</p> <div>Whether you make beer at a local business or at home, learn more about the brewing process at “Microbiology for Brewers” offered by the University of Wisconsin-Stevens Point Continuing Education on Saturday and Sunday, September 29-30.</div> <div>Held in a fully equipped microbiology lab at UW-Stevens Point, the course will be taught by Associate Professor of Biology Terese Barta and will include the biological aspects of managing yeast and bacteria in the brewing process. Participants will also learn how to determine yeast populations, how to detect and identify bacterial contaminants and microscopic staining, and observation techniques.</div> <div>Offered to a small group of 12 will allow for personalized attention for each participant. The course is for established brewers only, as this is not a course on how to brew beer.  The course cost of $169 includes all materials. </div> <div>To register or for more information, call UW-Stevens Point Continuing Education at 1-800-898-9472, or visit <a href="/conted/ConfWrkShp/Pages/BrewingMicrobiology.aspx">www.uwsp.edu/conted/ConfWrkShp/Pages/BrewingMicrobiology.aspx</a>.</div> <div><a href="/urc/news/Pages/MicrobiologyBrewers12.aspx">http://www.uwsp.edu/urc/news/Pages/MicrobiologyBrewers12.aspx</a></div> </div> <br style='clear:both;' /></div></DIV>
  
6/27/2012Staff Award/biology/SiteAssets/images/news/blank.gif

Faculty and staff members at the University of Wisconsin-Stevens Point have been recognized for outstanding work during the 2011-2012 academic year.
Selected for the Excellence in Teaching Award were Valerie Barske, assistant professor of history; Cortney Chaffin, assistant professor of art and design; Nisha Fernando, associate professor of interior architecture; Richard Hauer, associate professor of urban forestry; and Alek Toumi, professor of French.
Recognized with the University Scholar Award was Dan Breining, professor of Spanish, and Susan Brewer, professor of history. The recipients of the University Service Award were David Hastings, professor of music, and Nancy LoPatin-Lummis, professor and chair of history.
The Academic Staff Excellence Award was given to John Hardy, associate lecturer and lab/greenhouse manager in biology, and the Academic Staff Spirit of Community Service Award was given to Eric Olson, director and specialist with UW-Extension Lakes.
Winner of the Classified Staff Carolyn Rolfson Sargis Award was Anne Swenson, a library acquisitions and library services assistant-advanced.
<DIV><div id='articleHeadline'>Outstanding UW-Stevens Point faculty and staff recognized <a href='/biology/Pages/news.aspx#Staff Award'>MORE</a></div></DIV><DIV><div class='article'><a id='Staff Award'></a><h1 class='ms-rteElement-H1'>​Outstanding UW-Stevens Point faculty and staff recognized</h1> <img src=/biology/SiteAssets/images/news/blank.gif style='float:right;'><div class="ExternalClass2138E5BE1D4D4E0BB1CB3E665B7E55A1"><p>​</p> <div>Faculty and staff members at the University of Wisconsin-Stevens Point have been recognized for outstanding work during the 2011-2012 academic year.</div> <div>Selected for the Excellence in Teaching Award were Valerie Barske, assistant professor of history; Cortney Chaffin, assistant professor of art and design; Nisha Fernando, associate professor of interior architecture; Richard Hauer, associate professor of urban forestry; and Alek Toumi, professor of French.</div> <div>Recognized with the University Scholar Award was Dan Breining, professor of Spanish, and Susan Brewer, professor of history. The recipients of the University Service Award were David Hastings, professor of music, and Nancy LoPatin-Lummis, professor and chair of history.</div> <div><strong>The Academic Staff Excellence Award was given to</strong><strong> John Hardy</strong><strong>, associate lecturer and lab/greenhouse manager in biology</strong>, and the Academic Staff Spirit of Community Service Award was given to Eric Olson, director and specialist with UW-Extension Lakes.</div> <div>Winner of the Classified Staff Carolyn Rolfson Sargis Award was Anne Swenson, a library acquisitions and library services assistant-advanced.</div> <div><a href="/urc/news/Pages/FacStaffAwards12.aspx">http://www.uwsp.edu/urc/news/Pages/FacStaffAwards12.aspx</a></div> </div> <br style='clear:both;' /></div></DIV>
  
5/11/2012Goldwater/biology/SiteAssets/images/news/blank.gif

A University of Wisconsin-Stevens Point student has received the prestigious Barry M. Goldwater Excellence in Science Scholarship.
Erica Swenson, a junior biochemistry major and Hayward native, is the 13th Goldwater Scholar from UW-Stevens Point. Considered the premier scholarship of its kind, the Goldwater Scholarship is given each year to undergraduate students with exceptional potential for a career in science and carries a stipend of $7,500 a year for up to two years. Swenson was selected from 1,123 students nominated by faculty members from the U.S. She submitted an extensive research proposal to become one of 282 winners. 
Swenson studies cancer genetics with Biology Professor Diane Caporale, and based her Goldwater scholarship proposal on her research of several mutations in the cancer-related genes of one individual and their transmission through three generations of her family. She also spent one summer surveying mosquitoes in northern Wisconsin with Biology Professor Jamee Hubbard and another summer studying the distribution of a newer strain of Lyme disease bacterium in Wisconsin. This summer, Swenson will continue her study of cancer genes and have a shadow internship with a genetic counselor and clinical geneticist at the Marshfield Clinic in Wausau.
Swenson plans to attend medical school and have a career in medical genetics. She is also studying music at UW-Stevens Point.
Contact:   Professor Sol Sepsenwol, UW-Stevens Point’s Goldwater Scholarship coordinator,
715-346-4256, ssepsenw@uwsp.edu or Diane Caporale, 715-346-3922, dcaporal@uwsp.edu.
<DIV><div id='articleHeadline'>UW-Stevens Point student wins Goldwater scholarship <a href='/biology/Pages/news.aspx#Goldwater'>MORE</a></div></DIV><DIV><div class='article'><a id='Goldwater'></a><h1 class='ms-rteElement-H1'>​UW-Stevens Point student wins Goldwater scholarship</h1> <img src=/biology/SiteAssets/images/news/blank.gif style='float:right;'><div class="ExternalClass75E93998F6DE4F8E891081E621998254"><p>​</p> <div>A University of Wisconsin-Stevens Point student has received the prestigious Barry M. Goldwater Excellence in Science Scholarship. </div> <div><strong>Erica Swenson</strong>, a junior biochemistry major and Hayward native, is the 13th Goldwater Scholar from UW-Stevens Point. Considered the premier scholarship of its kind, the Goldwater Scholarship is given each year to undergraduate students with exceptional potential for a career in science and carries a stipend of $7,500 a year for up to two years. Swenson was selected from 1,123 students nominated by faculty members from the U.S. She submitted an extensive research proposal to become one of 282 winners.  </div> <div>Swenson studies cancer genetics with Biology Professor Diane Caporale, and based her Goldwater scholarship proposal on her research of several mutations in the cancer-related genes of one individual and their transmission through three generations of her family. She also spent one summer surveying mosquitoes in northern Wisconsin with Biology Professor Jamee Hubbard and another summer studying the distribution of a newer strain of Lyme disease bacterium in Wisconsin. This summer, Swenson will continue her study of cancer genes and have a shadow internship with a genetic counselor and clinical geneticist at the Marshfield Clinic in Wausau. </div> <div>Swenson plans to attend medical school and have a career in medical genetics. She is also studying music at UW-Stevens Point. </div> <div>Contact:   Professor Sol Sepsenwol, UW-Stevens Point’s Goldwater Scholarship coordinator,<br />715-346-4256, <a href="mailto:ssepsenw@uwsp.edu">ssepsenw@uwsp.edu</a> or Diane Caporale, 715-346-3922, <a href="mailto:dcaporal@uwsp.edu">dcaporal@uwsp.edu</a>.</div> <div><a href="/urc/news/Pages/Goldwater12-Swenson.aspx">http://www.uwsp.edu/urc/news/Pages/Goldwater12-Swenson.aspx</a></div></div> <br style='clear:both;' /></div></DIV>
  
5/3/2012Unplugged/biology/SiteAssets/images/news/blank.gif


Fish farmers will convene in northern Wisconsin to share best practices and gain insight from aquaculture experts at the University of Wisconsin-Stevens Point Northern Aquaculture Demonstration Facility (NADF).
Located in Red Cliff, the NADF has joined with UW-Extension and the Wisconsin Aquaculture Association to offer the hands-on workshop, “Aquaculture Unplugged.” This workshop will be held Thursday, May 31, to give fish farmers the opportunity to participate in focused sessions on various aspects of fish rearing including both pond and indoor culture. They will utilize NADF’s ongoing projects, including hybrid walleye (saugeye), yellow perch and arctic char, to learn practical skills and knowledge that can be taken back to farms and put to use.
A number of nationally recognized speakers will be leading these sessions, including Robert Summerfelt, who has done extensive research on walleye; Charles Mischke, an international expert on pond culture; and Ed Aneshansley and Tom Waldrop, both of whom specialize in recirculation aquaculture systems (RAS).
The workshop is open to any fish farmer or others interested in aquaculture. Participants will choose two of the following sessions: Hybrid Walleye (saugeye) or Pond Aeration, and RAS Engineering or Pond Fertilization.
The cost is $50 per person and includes the workshop, handouts, break, lunch, Vendor Fair and fish fry. For more information about the workshop, contact Greg Fischer at 715-779-3461. For registration information, contact Cindy Johnson at 715-373-2990 or visit www.wisconsinaquaculture.com.
The Northern Aquaculture Demonstration Facility has worked on numerous aquaculture projects since its inception seven years ago and has shown success in several species that can be adapted to fish farms. NADF’s mission is to promote and advance the development of commercial aquaculture in a northern climate.
<DIV><div id='articleHeadline'>UW-Stevens Point aquaculture facility to host Aquaculture Unplugged <a href='/biology/Pages/news.aspx#Unplugged'>MORE</a></div></DIV><DIV><div class='article'><a id='Unplugged'></a><h1 class='ms-rteElement-H1'>​UW-Stevens Point aquaculture facility to host Aquaculture Unplugged</h1> <img src=/biology/SiteAssets/images/news/blank.gif style='float:right;'><div class="ExternalClassD9D6DA77FB544561ABDBC70F24121E39"><p>​</p> <div><br />Fish farmers will convene in northern Wisconsin to share best practices and gain insight from aquaculture experts at the University of Wisconsin-Stevens Point Northern Aquaculture Demonstration Facility (NADF).</div> <div>Located in Red Cliff, the NADF has joined with UW-Extension and the Wisconsin Aquaculture Association to offer the hands-on workshop, “Aquaculture Unplugged.” This workshop will be held Thursday, May 31, to give fish farmers the opportunity to participate in focused sessions on various aspects of fish rearing including both pond and indoor culture. They will utilize NADF’s ongoing projects, including hybrid walleye (saugeye), yellow perch and arctic char, to learn practical skills and knowledge that can be taken back to farms and put to use.</div> <div>A number of nationally recognized speakers will be leading these sessions, including Robert Summerfelt, who has done extensive research on walleye; Charles Mischke, an international expert on pond culture; and Ed Aneshansley and Tom Waldrop, both of whom specialize in recirculation aquaculture systems (RAS).</div> <div>The workshop is open to any fish farmer or others interested in aquaculture. Participants will choose two of the following sessions: Hybrid Walleye (saugeye) or Pond Aeration, and RAS Engineering or Pond Fertilization.</div> <div>The cost is $50 per person and includes the workshop, handouts, break, lunch, Vendor Fair and fish fry. For more information about the workshop, contact Greg Fischer at 715-779-3461. For registration information, contact Cindy Johnson at 715-373-2990 or visit <a href="http://www.wisconsinaquaculture.com/">www.wisconsinaquaculture.com</a>.</div> <div>The Northern Aquaculture Demonstration Facility has worked on numerous aquaculture projects since its inception seven years ago and has shown success in several species that can be adapted to fish farms. NADF’s mission is to promote and advance the development of commercial aquaculture in a northern climate.</div> <div><a href="/urc/news/Pages/NADFaquacultureunplugged12.aspx">http://www.uwsp.edu/urc/news/Pages/NADFaquacultureunplugged12.aspx</a></div> </div> <br style='clear:both;' /></div></DIV>
  
5/1/2012NSF Fellowships/biology/SiteAssets/images/news/AlinaOtt-sm.jpg

Three alumni of the University of Wisconsin-Stevens Point have been awarded funding for graduate research through the National Science Foundation.
Alina Ott, Tracey Oudenhoven and Randall Siedschlag, all 2011 graduates now attending graduate school, were among the 2,000 students selected from across the United States for a National Science Foundation Graduate Research Fellowship. They will each receive three years of support, including a $30,000 annual stipend, $12,000 cost-of-education allowance to their current institution, international research and professional development opportunities, and TeraGrid supercomputer access.
Ott, a native of Mount Horeb attending Iowa State University, is researching plant genetics. While at UW-Stevens Point, she worked with Biology Professor Devinder Sandhu mapping soybean genes for sterility, exploring meiotic recombination across soybean chromosomes and examining gene expression in wheat brassinosteroid pathways. She received the Barry M. Goldwater Scholarship for a project which mapped cotyledon color in soybeans.
Oudenhoven is a Stevens Point native attending UW-Madison where she is pursuing a doctorate in physical chemistry with laser spectroscopy as her primary research focus. She was actively involved in research with Assistant Professor Jason D’Acchioli in UW-Stevens Point’s Chemistry Department, beginning in her freshman year with the study of hydrogen producing catalysts both computationally and experimentally. She earned a first National Science Foundation Fellowship to study at the University of California last summer, where she employed lasers to study bacteria-killing dyes.
Siedschlag, a Wautoma native, is studying chemistry at the University of Minnesota-Twin Cities. While at UW-Stevens Point he worked with D’Acchioli developing novel solar cell materials as part of a WISys project. He also worked on a fundamental chemistry project investigating the properties of organometallic molecules. Siedschlag is currently working on developing novel heterobimetallic catalysts for use in energy problems.
UW-Stevens Point has had three previous alumni winners of the fellowship in the last 12 years, including Sarah Orlofske from the Biology Department and Azaree Lintereur from the Physics and Astronomy Department in 2007, and Travis Booms from the Biology Department in 2000.
<DIV><div id='articleHeadline'>UW-Stevens Point alumni earn National Science Foundation fellowships <a href='/biology/Pages/news.aspx#NSF Fellowships'>MORE</a></div></DIV><DIV><div class='article'><a id='NSF Fellowships'></a><h1 class='ms-rteElement-H1'>​UW-Stevens Point alumni earn National Science Foundation fellowships</h1> <img src=/biology/SiteAssets/images/news/AlinaOtt-sm.jpg style='float:right;'><div class="ExternalClass83BF9D894BE842C5A6A42C2734B159BC"><p>​</p> <div>Three alumni of the University of Wisconsin-Stevens Point have been awarded funding for graduate research through the National Science Foundation.</div> <div><strong>Alina Ott</strong>, Tracey Oudenhoven and Randall Siedschlag, all 2011 graduates now attending graduate school, were among the 2,000 students selected from across the United States for a National Science Foundation Graduate Research Fellowship. They will each receive three years of support, including a $30,000 annual stipend, $12,000 cost-of-education allowance to their current institution, international research and professional development opportunities, and TeraGrid supercomputer access.</div> <div><strong>Ott, a native of Mount Horeb attending Iowa State University, is researching plant genetics. While at UW-Stevens Point, she worked with Biology Professor Devinder Sandhu mapping soybean genes for sterility, exploring meiotic recombination across soybean chromosomes and examining gene expression in wheat brassinosteroid pathways. She received the Barry M. Goldwater Scholarship for a project which mapped cotyledon color in soybeans.</strong></div> <div>Oudenhoven is a Stevens Point native attending UW-Madison where she is pursuing a doctorate in physical chemistry with laser spectroscopy as her primary research focus. She was actively involved in research with Assistant Professor Jason D’Acchioli in UW-Stevens Point’s Chemistry Department, beginning in her freshman year with the study of hydrogen producing catalysts both computationally and experimentally. She earned a first National Science Foundation Fellowship to study at the University of California last summer, where she employed lasers to study bacteria-killing dyes.</div> <div>Siedschlag, a Wautoma native, is studying chemistry at the University of Minnesota-Twin Cities. While at UW-Stevens Point he worked with D’Acchioli developing novel solar cell materials as part of a WISys project. He also worked on a fundamental chemistry project investigating the properties of organometallic molecules. Siedschlag is currently working on developing novel heterobimetallic catalysts for use in energy problems.</div> <div>UW-Stevens Point has had three previous alumni winners of the fellowship in the last 12 years, including Sarah Orlofske from the Biology Department and Azaree Lintereur from the Physics and Astronomy Department in 2007, and Travis Booms from the Biology Department in 2000.</div> <div><a href="/urc/news/Pages/NSFgradfellows12.aspx">http://www.uwsp.edu/urc/news/Pages/NSFgradfellows12.aspx</a></div></div> <br style='clear:both;' /></div></DIV>
  
2/29/2012MORE/biology/SiteAssets/images/news/blank.gif

Physiology Fair

Attention area high school students:
Come Participate, Get Recognized, and Be Famous!

Careers in the sciences are constantly growing. Take advantage of this opportunity to explore the many different aspects of physiology through a program that works cooperatively with students from the University of Wisconsin-Stevens Point (UWSP). The Physiology Fair is an opportunity for you to explore a topic in physiology that interests you, and to share what you learn with the community. Our UWSP undergraduate student sponsors will be there to help you do this.

More information here.​

<DIV><div id='articleHeadline'>Physiology Fair comes to UW-Stevens Point <a href='/biology/Pages/news.aspx#MORE'>MORE</a></div></DIV><DIV><div class='article'><a id='MORE'></a><h1 class='ms-rteElement-H1'>​Physiology Fair comes to UW-Stevens Point</h1> <img src=/biology/SiteAssets/images/news/blank.gif style='float:right;'><div class="ExternalClassDC62F2787E074669822F7859EA70B9D1"><div class="ExternalClass0DBDCC5E0A61420F988FCC63C9826BF2" style="font-size:10pt"><p><strong>Physiology Fair</strong></p> <p style="font-size:8pt"><strong></strong>Attention area high school students:<br />Come Participate, Get Recognized, and Be Famous!</p> <p style="font-size:8pt">Careers in the sciences are constantly growing. Take advantage of this opportunity to explore the many different aspects of physiology through a program that works cooperatively with students from the University of Wisconsin-Stevens Point (UWSP). The Physiology Fair is an opportunity for you to explore a topic in physiology that interests you, and to share what you learn with the community. Our UWSP undergraduate student sponsors will be there to help you do this. </p> <p style="font-size:8pt">More information <a href="/biology/Pages/Fair/default.aspx">here</a>.​</p></div></div> <br style='clear:both;' /></div></DIV>
  
2/24/2012Women & Science/biology/SiteAssets/images/news/blank.gif

Women & Science Day at UW-Stevens Point on Friday
 
What:                
Women & Science Day will be held at the University of Wisconsin-Stevens Point on Friday, Feb. 24, as more than 400 area seventh and eighth grade girls come to campus to learn more about future careers in the sciences from women who are experts in their field.
In addition to a keynote speech, students will attend several workshops during the day, learning about topics in biology, veterinary medicine, engineering, chemistry, psychology, health, medical investigation, nursing and natural resources, among others. Exhibitors from Riverside Medical Center and ThedaCare as well as the UW-Stevens Point Admissions Office, Chemistry Department and Continuing Education program will also be included.
Who:                 
The keynote address, “An Education in Science Opens Many Doors,” will be presented by Laura Nelson, a UW-Stevens Point alumna and chief medical officer at the Marshfield Clinic.
When/Where:   
9 a.m., keynote presentation, Laird Room, Dreyfus University Center
10-11 a.m., 12-1 p.m. 1:15-2:15 p.m. Workshop sessions at various campus buildings
Contact:            
UW-Stevens Point Continuing Education
Julie Hellweg, 715-346-3730 or Samantha Pech, 715-346-4593
www.uwsp.edu/conted/women_science
<DIV><div id='articleHeadline'>Women & Science Day at UW-Stevens Point <a href='/biology/Pages/news.aspx#Women & Science'>MORE</a></div></DIV><DIV><div class='article'><a id='Women & Science'></a><h1 class='ms-rteElement-H1'>​Women & Science Day at UW-Stevens Point</h1> <img src=/biology/SiteAssets/images/news/blank.gif style='float:right;'><div class="ExternalClassDB1C180D62714AF3958E61487380E7DB"><p>​</p> <div>Women &amp; Science Day at UW-Stevens Point on Friday</div> <div> </div> <div>What:                 <br />Women &amp; Science Day will be held at the University of Wisconsin-Stevens Point on Friday, Feb. 24, as more than 400 area seventh and eighth grade girls come to campus to learn more about future careers in the sciences from women who are experts in their field.</div> <div>In addition to a keynote speech, students will attend several workshops during the day, learning about topics in biology, veterinary medicine, engineering, chemistry, psychology, health, medical investigation, nursing and natural resources, among others. Exhibitors from Riverside Medical Center and ThedaCare as well as the UW-Stevens Point Admissions Office, Chemistry Department and Continuing Education program will also be included.</div> <div>Who:                  <br />The keynote address, “An Education in Science Opens Many Doors,” will be presented by Laura Nelson, a UW-Stevens Point alumna and chief medical officer at the Marshfield Clinic.</div> <div>When/Where:    <br />9 a.m., keynote presentation, Laird Room, Dreyfus University Center<br />10-11 a.m., 12-1 p.m. 1:15-2:15 p.m. Workshop sessions at various campus buildings </div> <div>Contact:             <br />UW-Stevens Point Continuing Education<br />Julie Hellweg, 715-346-3730 or Samantha Pech, 715-346-4593<br /><a href="/conted/women_science">www.uwsp.edu/conted/women_science</a></div> <div><a href="/urc/news/Pages/WomenandScienceAdvisory.aspx">http://www.uwsp.edu/urc/news/Pages/WomenandScienceAdvisory.aspx</a></div> </div> <br style='clear:both;' /></div></DIV>
  
5/1/2011Engum Award/biology/SiteAssets/images/news/YOUR_IMAGE.jpg

​Jackie Engum, Academic Department Associate for the UWSP Department of Biology, has been recognized with an Outstanding Work Performance Award by the Classified Staff Advisory Council.

The Outstanding Work Performance Award recognizes performance far beyond what is normally expected of an employee. It includes taking on additional responsibilities or increased workload, accepting and completing special projects that are not part of the employee’s normal work duties, developing or modifying procedures or exhibiting behavior that enhances the employee’s workplace.

 “Without her, the Biology Department would not run,” said Department Chair Chris Yahnke.  “Jackie makes it all possible while making it look smooth and easy.”

More here.

<DIV><div id='articleHeadline'>Engum receives Award. <a href='/biology/Pages/news.aspx#Engum Award'>MORE</a></div></DIV><DIV><div class='article'><a id='Engum Award'></a><h1 class='ms-rteElement-H1'>​Engum receives Award.</h1> <img src=/biology/SiteAssets/images/news/YOUR_IMAGE.jpg style='float:right;'><div class="ExternalClass39FD7F9A797E4037ACA34D479687E746"><p>​Jackie Engum, Academic Department Associate for the UWSP Department of Biology, has been recognized with an Outstanding Work Performance Award by the Classified Staff Advisory Council.<br /><br />The Outstanding Work Performance Award recognizes performance far beyond what is normally expected of an employee. It includes taking on additional responsibilities or increased workload, accepting and completing special projects that are not part of the employee’s normal work duties, developing or modifying procedures or exhibiting behavior that enhances the employee’s workplace.<br /><br /> “Without her, the Biology Department would not run,” said Department Chair Chris Yahnke.  “Jackie makes it all possible while making it look smooth and easy.”<br /><br />More here.</p></div> <br style='clear:both;' /></div></DIV>
  
4/1/2011Symposium/biology/SiteAssets/images/news/SymposiumPoster.jpg

​Students and faculty showcased their collaborative research at the twelfth annual College of Letters and Science Undergraduate Research Symposium on Friday, April 29. A record of more than 400 students, parents, faculty, retired faculty and community members attended.


“Our annual undergraduate research symposium represents our students and faculty at their very best, fulfilling the college’s goal of focusing on undergraduate education and research,” said Dean Chris Cirmo. “We are proud to highlight the major reason we exist as a college; to cherish and cultivate the special relationship which develops between the student and faculty member through directed research.”


More here.

<DIV><div id='articleHeadline'>Symposium Showcases Collaborative Research <a href='/biology/Pages/news.aspx#Symposium'>MORE</a></div></DIV><DIV><div class='article'><a id='Symposium'></a><h1 class='ms-rteElement-H1'>​Symposium Showcases Collaborative Research</h1> <img src=/biology/SiteAssets/images/news/SymposiumPoster.jpg style='float:right;'><div class="ExternalClass13E6E209DF08437AB493C4FD7FB35EC8"><p>​Students and faculty showcased their collaborative research at the twelfth annual College of Letters and Science Undergraduate Research Symposium on Friday, April 29. A record of more than 400 students, parents, faculty, retired faculty and community members attended.</p> <p><br />“Our annual undergraduate research symposium represents our students and faculty at their very best, fulfilling the college’s goal of focusing on undergraduate education and research,” said Dean Chris Cirmo. “We are proud to highlight the major reason we exist as a college; to cherish and cultivate the special relationship which develops between the student and faculty member through directed research.”</p> <p><br />More here.</p></div> <br style='clear:both;' /></div></DIV>
  
3/1/2011Museum Crawl/biology/SiteAssets/images/news/MuseumNatHistLogo-sm.jpg

​Guided tours of scientific research and teaching collections will be featured at the Open House of the Museum of Natural History at the University of Wisconsin-Stevens Point on Saturday, March 12.

Students will give guided tours of the dozen scientific collections housed within and outside the museum, as well as the Freckmann Herbarium. Tours will also feature the archaeology, anthropology, entomology, geology, herbarium, herpetology, ichthyology, mammalogy, ornithology, paleontology, and parasitology collections.

More here.

<DIV><div id='articleHeadline'>Museum of Natural History Open House and “Collection Crawl” <a href='/biology/Pages/news.aspx#Museum Crawl'>MORE</a></div></DIV><DIV><div class='article'><a id='Museum Crawl'></a><h1 class='ms-rteElement-H1'>​Museum of Natural History Open House and “Collection Crawl”</h1> <img src=/biology/SiteAssets/images/news/MuseumNatHistLogo-sm.jpg style='float:right;'><div class="ExternalClass38038B32D943440993977AD879469863"><p>​Guided tours of scientific research and teaching collections will be featured at the Open House of the Museum of Natural History at the University of Wisconsin-Stevens Point on Saturday, March 12.<br /><br />Students will give guided tours of the dozen scientific collections housed within and outside the museum, as well as the Freckmann Herbarium. Tours will also feature the archaeology, anthropology, entomology, geology, herbarium, herpetology, ichthyology, mammalogy, ornithology, paleontology, and parasitology collections. <br /><br />More here.<br /></p></div> <br style='clear:both;' /></div></DIV>
  
2/1/2011Freire Liverwor/biology/SiteAssets/images/faculty/vfreire.jpg

​Virginia Freire, associate professor of biology and bryophyte curator at the UWSP Museum of Natural History, spent a year researching Guatemala’s cloud forest bryophytes. She produced the first-ever study of the hepatoflora of a Guatemalan cloud forest.  Her research will be published in the “Journal of Tropical Bryology”.

“A considerable portion of the botanical richness of these ecosystems is due to the large number of bryophytes,” said Freire. “Liverworts are most abundant in the epiphytic/epiphyllic biomass of the cloud forest, with my research finding at least 105 species of liverworts from the Biotopo Universitario para la Conservación del Quetzal (BUCQ) in the highlands of central Guatemala.” Epiphytic plants grow on other plants but are not parasites.

More here.

<DIV><div id='articleHeadline'>Freire first to catalogue Guatemala’s liverworts <a href='/biology/Pages/news.aspx#Freire Liverwor'>MORE</a></div></DIV><DIV><div class='article'><a id='Freire Liverwor'></a><h1 class='ms-rteElement-H1'>​Freire first to catalogue Guatemala’s liverworts</h1> <img src=/biology/SiteAssets/images/faculty/vfreire.jpg style='float:right;'><div class="ExternalClass03EE328A1D3D46B9AF7FBA607454F77D"><p>​Virginia Freire, associate professor of biology and bryophyte curator at the UWSP Museum of Natural History, spent a year researching Guatemala’s cloud forest bryophytes. She produced the first-ever study of the hepatoflora of a Guatemalan cloud forest.  Her research will be published in the “Journal of Tropical Bryology”.<br /><br />“A considerable portion of the botanical richness of these ecosystems is due to the large number of bryophytes,” said Freire. “Liverworts are most abundant in the epiphytic/epiphyllic biomass of the cloud forest, with my research finding at least 105 species of liverworts from the Biotopo Universitario para la Conservación del Quetzal (BUCQ) in the highlands of central Guatemala.” Epiphytic plants grow on other plants but are not parasites.<br /><br />More here.</p></div> <br style='clear:both;' /></div></DIV>
  
1/1/2011Aquaculture Gra/biology/SiteAssets/images/news/Aquaculture-sm.jpg

​A team of researchers at the University of Wisconsin-Stevens Point has landed a two-year $200,000 U.S. Department of Commerce, Sea Grant, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration grant to develop a Geographic Information Systems (GIS)-based analysis of sustainable domestic aquaculture development in Wisconsin. 


Christopher Hartleb, professor of biology and co-director of the Northern Aquaculture Demonstration Facility, Keith Rice and Doug Miskowiak of the GIS Center, and Sarah Kaatz of UW-Extension will develop GIS-based predictive aquaculture farm models to establish a road map for the Wisconsin aquaculture industry. The results of this project will generate culture and system-specific models to help extension personnel, land-use managers, fish culturists, businesses, and agriculture and natural resource specialists to evaluate potential fish farm locations in Wisconsin.


More here.

<DIV><div id='articleHeadline'>Researchers receive federal grant to promote aquaculture industry <a href='/biology/Pages/news.aspx#Aquaculture Gra'>MORE</a></div></DIV><DIV><div class='article'><a id='Aquaculture Gra'></a><h1 class='ms-rteElement-H1'>​Researchers receive federal grant to promote aquaculture industry</h1> <img src=/biology/SiteAssets/images/news/Aquaculture-sm.jpg style='float:right;'><div class="ExternalClassFE202A8B56D3402AB70F674E3F16801A"><p>​A team of researchers at the University of Wisconsin-Stevens Point has landed a two-year $200,000 U.S. Department of Commerce, Sea Grant, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration grant to develop a Geographic Information Systems (GIS)-based analysis of sustainable domestic aquaculture development in Wisconsin. </p> <p><br />Christopher Hartleb, professor of biology and co-director of the Northern Aquaculture Demonstration Facility, Keith Rice and Doug Miskowiak of the GIS Center, and Sarah Kaatz of UW-Extension will develop GIS-based predictive aquaculture farm models to establish a road map for the Wisconsin aquaculture industry. The results of this project will generate culture and system-specific models to help extension personnel, land-use managers, fish culturists, businesses, and agriculture and natural resource specialists to evaluate potential fish farm locations in Wisconsin.</p> <p><br />More here.</p></div> <br style='clear:both;' /></div></DIV>
  
12/1/2010Hawk Migration/biology/SiteAssets/images/news/HawkResearch-sm.jpg

​“Shift to Later Timing of Autumnal Migrating Sharp-shinned Hawks,” will be published in The Wilson Journal of Ornithology.  Robert Rosenfield, professor of biology and world-renowned Cooper’s hawk expert, biology major Jenna Cava, and Dan Lamers of Waupaca, collaborated on the work.

Cava’s work took place last semester when she was a freshman honors student intern with her adviser Rosenfield.   “For a true freshman to have co-authored such a piece speaks highly of Jenna and her abilities and talents,” said Rosenfield. “In over 20 years of publishing peer-reviewed manuscripts with undergraduates as co-authors, this is the very first time that a freshman was involved with such an endeavor.”

More here.

<DIV><div id='articleHeadline'>Rosenfield, student to publish hawk migration research. <a href='/biology/Pages/news.aspx#Hawk Migration'>MORE</a></div></DIV><DIV><div class='article'><a id='Hawk Migration'></a><h1 class='ms-rteElement-H1'>​Rosenfield, student to publish hawk migration research.</h1> <img src=/biology/SiteAssets/images/news/HawkResearch-sm.jpg style='float:right;'><div class="ExternalClass28D7F7351B6846618E5EEE16E1A27ADE"><p>​“Shift to Later Timing of Autumnal Migrating Sharp-shinned Hawks,” will be published in The Wilson Journal of Ornithology.  Robert Rosenfield, professor of biology and world-renowned Cooper’s hawk expert, biology major Jenna Cava, and Dan Lamers of Waupaca, collaborated on the work. <br /><br />Cava’s work took place last semester when she was a freshman honors student intern with her adviser Rosenfield.   “For a true freshman to have co-authored such a piece speaks highly of Jenna and her abilities and talents,” said Rosenfield. “In over 20 years of publishing peer-reviewed manuscripts with undergraduates as co-authors, this is the very first time that a freshman was involved with such an endeavor.”<br /><br />More here.</p></div> <br style='clear:both;' /></div></DIV>
  
11/1/2010Caporale Lectur/biology/SiteAssets/images/faculty/dcaporal.jpg

​Diane Caporale, professor of biology at the UWSP, will look at the growing threat of Lyme disease and other tick-borne diseases at the third lecture of the 2010-2011 College of Letters & Science Community Lecture Series.

Caporale’s presentation, “What is Your Risk of Contracting Lyme Disease and Other Tick-borne Diseases in Central Wisconsin?” is free and open to the public on Thursday, Nov. 11, at 7 p.m. in the Stevens Point Area Senior High School Auditorium.

She will examine the growing threats of tick-borne diseases and what can be done to minimize exposure to ourselves and families.

More here.

<DIV><div id='articleHeadline'>Caporale to present public lecture on Lyme disease. <a href='/biology/Pages/news.aspx#Caporale Lectur'>MORE</a></div></DIV><DIV><div class='article'><a id='Caporale Lectur'></a><h1 class='ms-rteElement-H1'>​Caporale to present public lecture on Lyme disease.</h1> <img src=/biology/SiteAssets/images/faculty/dcaporal.jpg style='float:right;'><div class="ExternalClassB969DB63632C45268F89266F67CF92D5"><p>​Diane Caporale, professor of biology at the UWSP, will look at the growing threat of Lyme disease and other tick-borne diseases at the third lecture of the 2010-2011 College of Letters &amp; Science Community Lecture Series.<br /><br />Caporale’s presentation, “What is Your Risk of Contracting Lyme Disease and Other Tick-borne Diseases in Central Wisconsin?” is free and open to the public on Thursday, Nov. 11, at 7 p.m. in the Stevens Point Area Senior High School Auditorium.<br /><br />She will examine the growing threats of tick-borne diseases and what can be done to minimize exposure to ourselves and families. <br /><br />More here.</p></div> <br style='clear:both;' /></div></DIV>
  
10/1/2010soy research/biology/SiteAssets/images/news/RyanFraschCourtneyWeigand.jpg

​Recent UWSP Department of Biology graduates Ryan Frasch and Courtney Weigand have published “Molecular Mapping of 2 Environmentally Sensitive Male-Sterile Mutants in Soybean” in the Journal of Heredity.  Their research was conducted at UWSP under the guidance of professor Devinder Sandhu, and with collaborators at Iowa State University.

“It is a great satisfaction to see our students succeed,” said Sandhu.

 The article can be viewed here.

<DIV><div id='articleHeadline'>Students publish soybean research <a href='/biology/Pages/news.aspx#soy research'>MORE</a></div></DIV><DIV><div class='article'><a id='soy research'></a><h1 class='ms-rteElement-H1'>​Students publish soybean research</h1> <img src=/biology/SiteAssets/images/news/RyanFraschCourtneyWeigand.jpg style='float:right;'><div class="ExternalClass5E291BFDE4FD49278E8736DB62CCA8A9"><p>​Recent UWSP Department of Biology graduates Ryan Frasch and Courtney Weigand have published “Molecular Mapping of 2 Environmentally Sensitive Male-Sterile Mutants in Soybean” in the Journal of Heredity.  Their research was conducted at UWSP under the guidance of professor Devinder Sandhu, and with collaborators at Iowa State University.<br /><br />“It is a great satisfaction to see our students succeed,” said Sandhu.<br /><br /> The article can be viewed here.</p></div> <br style='clear:both;' /></div></DIV>
  
9/1/2010SandhuStudents/biology/SiteAssets/images/news/sandhu-students.jpg

​Devinder Sandhu, Associate Professor of Biology at University of Wisconsin Stevens Point, was awarded a $1.5 million grant by the National Science Foundation for his part in the global research effort to study and develop dwarf varieties of wheat that are drought resistant. Sandhu is working with scientists in developed and developing nations like India and Pakistan to identify and test the genes in wheat that would ultimately lead to increased yields.  In simple terms, the goal of the research is to help feed people around the world.

Professor Sandhu works very closely with several students including Jon-Paul W. Ciszewski, Joshua Rogers, Eric Wermedal, Jordan Baumbach, Jaydeep Raval, and Alina Ott (winner of the Barry M. Goldwater National Science Scholarship).

 “The students do everything,” Sandhu says, “But I’m here all the time if they ever need help.”  Sandhu notes that his name is at the very end of the list of authors in a recently published scientific paper. He explains that his students receive all the credit because they deserve it.

More here and here.

<DIV><div id='articleHeadline'>Sandhu Works with Students on $1.5 million Research Grant <a href='/biology/Pages/news.aspx#SandhuStudents'>MORE</a></div></DIV><DIV><div class='article'><a id='SandhuStudents'></a><h1 class='ms-rteElement-H1'>​Sandhu Works with Students on $1.5 million Research Grant</h1> <img src=/biology/SiteAssets/images/news/sandhu-students.jpg style='float:right;'><div class="ExternalClassAACC3B5A2A404F6D9228C668FCF89AB4"><p>​Devinder Sandhu, Associate Professor of Biology at University of Wisconsin Stevens Point, was awarded a $1.5 million grant by the National Science Foundation for his part in the global research effort to study and develop dwarf varieties of wheat that are drought resistant. Sandhu is working with scientists in developed and developing nations like India and Pakistan to identify and test the genes in wheat that would ultimately lead to increased yields.  In simple terms, the goal of the research is to help feed people around the world.<br /><br />Professor Sandhu works very closely with several students including Jon-Paul W. Ciszewski, Joshua Rogers, Eric Wermedal, Jordan Baumbach, Jaydeep Raval, and Alina Ott (winner of the Barry M. Goldwater National Science Scholarship).<br /><br /> “The students do everything,” Sandhu says, “But I’m here all the time if they ever need help.”  Sandhu notes that his name is at the very end of the list of authors in a recently published scientific paper. He explains that his students receive all the credit because they deserve it.<br /><br />More <a href="/COLS/Newsletters/files/To%20the%20Point%20-%20Nov%202010.pdf">here</a> and here.<br /></p></div> <br style='clear:both;' /></div></DIV>
  
7/27/2010Bamboo/biology/SiteAssets/Images/news/news-bambooresearch.jpg

​​​Two recent graduates of the UWSP Department of Biology made the most of their undergraduate research opportunities to help discover two new plant species, and now their recent results will be published in a national journal.

Eddie Shea of Omro and Tanya Wayda of Stevens Point, both of whom graduated in May, join Emmet Judziewicz, associate professor of biology and forestry, as co-authors of “Two new Bolivian species of Aulonemia (Poaceae: Bambusoideae: Bambuseae),” to be published this fall in “The Journal of the Botanical Research Institute of Texas.”

“I am so impressed by both of these young researchers and am honored to have them share in this finding with the scientific community,” said Judziewicz. "Both Tanya and Eddie have gained immeasurable experience in the scientific method and can put this research on their resumes for the rest of their lives.”

More here​.​​

<DIV><div id='articleHeadline'>Students identify two new plant species. <a href='/biology/Pages/news.aspx#Bamboo'>MORE</a></div></DIV><DIV><div class='article'><a id='Bamboo'></a><h1 class='ms-rteElement-H1'>​Students identify two new plant species.</h1> <img src=/biology/SiteAssets/Images/news/news-bambooresearch.jpg style='float:right;'><div class="ExternalClass6A77F4A465A041378FA23431C731D205"><p>​​​Two recent graduates of the UWSP Department of Biology made the most of their undergraduate research opportunities to help discover two new plant species, and now their recent results will be published in a national journal.</p> <p style="margin:0px 0px 10px">Eddie Shea of Omro and Tanya Wayda of Stevens Point, both of whom graduated in May, join Emmet Judziewicz, associate professor of biology and forestry, as co-authors of “Two new Bolivian species of Aulonemia (Poaceae: Bambusoideae: Bambuseae),” to be published this fall in “The Journal of the Botanical Research Institute of Texas.”</p> <p style="margin:0px 0px 10px">“I am so impressed by both of these young researchers and am honored to have them share in this finding with the scientific community,” said Judziewicz. &quot;Both Tanya and Eddie have gained immeasurable experience in the scientific method and can put this research on their resumes for the rest of their lives.”</p> <p style="margin:0px 0px 10px">More <a href="/news/article_viewer.aspx?id=386" style="text-decoration:none">here​</a>.​​</p></div> <br style='clear:both;' /></div></DIV>
  
5/11/2010Hawk/biology/SiteAssets/Images/news/bobcoop-sm.jpg

​​​UWSP biology professor Robert Rosenfield and seven collaborators have published "Comparative Morphology of Northern Populations of Breeding Cooper's Hawks" in the journal The Condor.

This article presents the results of 8 years of research into the morphological variation in large samples of live Cooper’s Hawks (A. cooperii) nesting in four study areas spanning 2660 km across the northern part of the species’ breeding range.  This study represents the first analysis of morphology based on live breeding Cooper’s Hawks from different regions of the species’ broad continental distribution.

The article can be viewed here.​​

<DIV><div id='articleHeadline'>Rosenfield publishes Cooper's Hawk research. <a href='/biology/Pages/news.aspx#Hawk'>MORE</a></div></DIV><DIV><div class='article'><a id='Hawk'></a><h1 class='ms-rteElement-H1'>​Rosenfield publishes Cooper's Hawk research.</h1> <img src=/biology/SiteAssets/Images/news/bobcoop-sm.jpg style='float:right;'><div class="ExternalClass0E3B0EF7E4ED412085E1F43F2663D586"><p>​​​UWSP biology professor Robert Rosenfield and seven collaborators have published &quot;Comparative Morphology of Northern Populations of Breeding Cooper's Hawks&quot; in the journal <span style="text-decoration:underline">The Condor</span>.</p> <p style="margin:0px 0px 10px">This article presents the results of 8 years of research into the morphological variation in large samples of live Cooper’s Hawks (A. <em>cooperii</em>) nesting in four study areas spanning 2660 km across the northern part of the species’ breeding range.  This study represents the first analysis of morphology based on live breeding Cooper’s Hawks from different regions of the species’ broad continental distribution.</p> <p style="margin:0px 0px 10px">The article can be viewed <a href="http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.1525/cond.2010.090148" style="text-decoration:none">here</a>.​​</p></div> <br style='clear:both;' /></div></DIV>
  
5/10/2010Gyrfalcons/biology/SiteAssets/Images/news/news-TravisBooms-sm.jpg

​​​Ten students will join UWSP biology professor Robert Rosenfield to study gyrfalcons with a UWSP alumnus this summer in the Yukon Delta National Wildlife Refuge in Western Alaska.

Rosenfield and his students will study with alumnus Travis Booms, a regional wildlife biologist with the Alaska Department of Fish and Game Wildlife Diversity Program.

More here​.​

<DIV><div id='articleHeadline'>Students to research Alaska’s gyrfalcons with UWSP alumnus. <a href='/biology/Pages/news.aspx#Gyrfalcons'>MORE</a></div></DIV><DIV><div class='article'><a id='Gyrfalcons'></a><h1 class='ms-rteElement-H1'>​Students to research Alaska’s gyrfalcons with UWSP alumnus.</h1> <img src=/biology/SiteAssets/Images/news/news-TravisBooms-sm.jpg style='float:right;'><div class="ExternalClass63B5C1CF389E4DCA95D6700B0C770351"><p>​​​Ten students will join UWSP biology professor Robert Rosenfield to study gyrfalcons with a UWSP alumnus this summer in the Yukon Delta National Wildlife Refuge in Western Alaska.</p> <p style="margin:0px 0px 10px">Rosenfield and his students will study with alumnus Travis Booms, a regional wildlife biologist with the Alaska Department of Fish and Game Wildlife Diversity Program.</p> <p style="margin:0px 0px 10px">More <a href="/news/article_viewer.aspx?id=334" style="text-decoration:none">here​</a>.​</p></div> <br style='clear:both;' /></div></DIV>
  
4/27/2010Rotunda/biology/SiteAssets/Images/news/news-Rotunda2010-JamieKlemish-Lassa-sm.jpg

​​​The work of 13 University of Wisconsin-Stevens Point student researchers will be showcased at the state capitol May 5 during the annual “Posters in the Rotunda.”

Wisconsin’s elected state officials and the UW System Board of Regents will be among the audience in Madison as the UWSP delegation joins student colleagues from across the UW institutions, filling the capitol rotunda with displays of their research.

“UWSP is on the leading edge of applied research in Wisconsin, and our focus is on student opportunity,” said Interim Chancellor Mark Nook. “We receive among the most external funding for research at the state’s regional universities, which supplements our state support and tuition dollars to help create hands-on research experiences for our students. Our success is further evidenced by the fact that we lead Wisconsin’s regional universities in the number of our alumni who have gone on to earn doctorate degrees over the past decade,” Nook observed.

UWSP Biology students taking part in the 2010 Posters at the Rotunda event are:

• Alina Ott of Mount Horeb. Her research objectives were to identify and characterize genes that control the quality trait of seed color in soybeans. Ott was recently named as a prestigious Goldwater National Science Scholar.

• Jaimie Klemish of New Auburn and Brooke Johnson of Stillwater, Minn., both biology majors, teamed up to determine current distribution of the amphibian disease causing fungus Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis throughout Wisconsin.

More here​.​​

<DIV><div id='articleHeadline'>Top Pointer scholars’ research to be showcased at the state capitol. <a href='/biology/Pages/news.aspx#Rotunda'>MORE</a></div></DIV><DIV><div class='article'><a id='Rotunda'></a><h1 class='ms-rteElement-H1'>​Top Pointer scholars’ research to be showcased at the state capitol.</h1> <img src=/biology/SiteAssets/Images/news/news-Rotunda2010-JamieKlemish-Lassa-sm.jpg style='float:right;'><div class="ExternalClass0940DC7950404B018D28882A69387195"><p>​​​The work of 13 University of Wisconsin-Stevens Point student researchers will be showcased at the state capitol May 5 during the annual “Posters in the Rotunda.”</p> <p style="margin:0px 0px 10px">Wisconsin’s elected state officials and the UW System Board of Regents will be among the audience in Madison as the UWSP delegation joins student colleagues from across the UW institutions, filling the capitol rotunda with displays of their research.</p> <p style="margin:0px 0px 10px">“UWSP is on the leading edge of applied research in Wisconsin, and our focus is on student opportunity,” said Interim Chancellor Mark Nook. “We receive among the most external funding for research at the state’s regional universities, which supplements our state support and tuition dollars to help create hands-on research experiences for our students. Our success is further evidenced by the fact that we lead Wisconsin’s regional universities in the number of our alumni who have gone on to earn doctorate degrees over the past decade,” Nook observed.</p> <p style="margin:0px 0px 10px">UWSP Biology students taking part in the 2010 Posters at the Rotunda event are:</p> <p style="margin:0px 0px 10px">• Alina Ott of Mount Horeb. Her research objectives were to identify and characterize genes that control the quality trait of seed color in soybeans. Ott was recently named as a prestigious Goldwater National Science Scholar.</p> <p style="margin:0px 0px 10px">• Jaimie Klemish of New Auburn and Brooke Johnson of Stillwater, Minn., both biology majors, teamed up to determine current distribution of the amphibian disease causing fungus Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis throughout Wisconsin.</p> <p style="margin:0px 0px 10px">More <a href="/news/article_viewer.aspx?id=308" style="text-decoration:none">here​</a>.​​</p></div> <br style='clear:both;' /></div></DIV>
  
4/14/2010Goldwater/biology/SiteAssets/images/news/news-Rotunda2010-AlinaOtt-cr-sm.jpg

​​​Two University of Wisconsin-Stevens Point students are among the nation’s top science scholars as recipients of the prestigious Barry M. Goldwater National Science Scholarship.

Alina Ott, a biology and biochemistry major from Mt. Horeb, and Michelle Stephens, a physics major from Saukville, both juniors, were selected from 1,111 mathematics, science and engineering students nominees nationwide. Six other UWSP students have been named Goldwater scholars since 2004.

Ott is doing research on using soybean seed-color genes for breeding new varieties. She studies with Devinder Sandhu, assistant professor of biology, who is an expert in plant genetics and was part of a large international group of scientists who recently published the entire DNA sequence of the soybean plant.

More here​.​​

<DIV><div id='articleHeadline'>Biology student wins Goldwater National Science Scholarship. <a href='/biology/Pages/news.aspx#Goldwater'>MORE</a></div></DIV><DIV><div class='article'><a id='Goldwater'></a><h1 class='ms-rteElement-H1'>​Biology student wins Goldwater National Science Scholarship.</h1> <img src=/biology/SiteAssets/images/news/news-Rotunda2010-AlinaOtt-cr-sm.jpg style='float:right;'><div class="ExternalClassA4CB2804705543E9A93F0D74F24CB8F6"><p>​​​Two University of Wisconsin-Stevens Point students are among the nation’s top science scholars as recipients of the prestigious Barry M. Goldwater National Science Scholarship.</p> <p style="margin:0px 0px 10px">Alina Ott, a biology and biochemistry major from Mt. Horeb, and Michelle Stephens, a physics major from Saukville, both juniors, were selected from 1,111 mathematics, science and engineering students nominees nationwide. Six other UWSP students have been named Goldwater scholars since 2004.</p> <p style="margin:0px 0px 10px">Ott is doing research on using soybean seed-color genes for breeding new varieties. She studies with Devinder Sandhu, assistant professor of biology, who is an expert in plant genetics and was part of a large international group of scientists who recently published the entire DNA sequence of the soybean plant.</p> <p style="margin:0px 0px 10px">More <a href="/news/article_viewer.aspx?id=287" style="text-decoration:none">here​</a>.​​</p></div> <br style='clear:both;' /></div></DIV>